Common Mods and Issues - updated 4/4/15 for outdoort's elbow fix - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods For maintaining, repair or modifications of Generation 1 KLR's. 2007 and earlier.

 
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post #1 of 3 Old 03-31-2012, 10:02 AM Thread Starter
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Arrow Common Mods and Issues - updated 4/4/15 for outdoort's elbow fix

This is Page One of Common Mods and Issues, dealing with Engine. Covers from the air box all the way to the muffler.

Common Mods and Issues, Page Two (Chassis and Suspension)
Common Mods and Issues, Page Three (Electrical)

This post is for common mods and issues that are well known and documented for the KLR650.

We've tried to link to posts threads that have good discussions about the mods, that show how-tos, and provide insight and experiences.

Here are scales for Difficulty, Satisfaction, Importance, and Cost, with examples. Interpolate for values between the examples.

Difficulty scale - 1-10
3, easy, no special tools, quick,
5, requires some special tools, not particularly hard, may take a couple of hours
7, requires special tools and knowledge or experience, lengthy
10, requires special tools and knowledge, lengthy, potential for screwing things up

Satisfaction scale - 1-10
3, does no harm, may not produce noticeable improvements
5, noticeable improvement in safety, reliability, performance
7, YeeeeHawww!
10, Wheelies, stoppies, burnouts, makes R1 owners cry (this rating is pretty rare on the KLR)

Importance scale, 1-10
3, take it or leave it
5, really should do
7, must do, prevents disaster
10, stop riding and do it

Cost Scale, 1-10
3, <$25
5, >$25 <$75
7, >$75 <$150
10, Have you considered a BMW or KTM?


Engine


22-cent Mod:

This is a simple mod that improves throttle response and fixes the lean condition that KLRs have coming from the factory. Its name comes from the cost of the two washers you need to do the mod. Also known as the 'Smile Maker'. All that is required is 2 #4 stainless washers, which go under the head of the main jet needle. The slide also gets drilled to 7/64". Remove the top, pull the needle, place the washers, drill the slide and re-assemble. Go to the bottom of the carb, pop the plug that covers the idle jet, and set it about 2 1/2 turns out. Voila! No more pop on decel, improved throttle response, and the lean condition is gone. And you get three pennies back from your quarter from the nice lady down at Ace.

Discussion, with a link to that other place.. gotta give props regardless...
Discussion of 22 cent, KLX, and L-Mod
Thread with Tim's step-by-step on how to do it without taking the carb off
vatrader's pictures on how to roll the carb over
Part and parcel with the 22 cent mod, adjusting the idle mix - most excellent pictures by vatrader
vatrader's carb pictures #1
Adventure-Moto's excellent step by step pictures
LoneRider's post on info that Ram1204fl found
Video on doing the 22 cent mod in the bike

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 7
Importance 3
Cost 1

Petcock Upgrade:

The KLR petcock operates off of engine vacuum. No vacuum, no flow. Vacuum bits gone south, no worky, KLR no run. Don't buy a new KLR petcock, try to repair the malfunctioning vacuum bits, or gin up some way to block the bits off. For not much money you can have a real petcock that always works! Just don't forget to turn it off....

Petcock upgrade

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 4
Importance 5
Cost 3

Doohickey:

The Doohickey is formally known as the 'balancer chain adjustment lever', which, on Gen 1 bikes is a chronic bad part. Gen 2 bikes have a better balancer lever, but crappy spring. Involves replacing the balancer and its tensioning spring.

Doohickey discussion (with pictures of broken bits!), some of it a bit testy...

Torsion Spring Installation
Torsion spring tool
Should I install a doo on my Gen2?






Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 4
Importance 7
Cost 5 without tools, 7 with tools

L-Mod:

This mod cuts out the top of the air box and removes the snorkel to provide better breathing. Done in concert with mods to the jetting and exhaust.

Discussion of 22 cent, KLX, and L-Mod
KLR-zin's write-up of the L-Mod, jetting, and needle installation

Difficulty 1
Satisfaction 3
Importance 2
Cost 1

KLX Needle:

This mod replaces the stock needle with the needle from a KLX, providing a richer mixture across the board. Often done in concert with mods to intake and exhaust.


Discussion of 22 cent, KLX, and L-Mod

KLR-zin's write-up (good pics) of the L-Mod, jetting, and needle installation, Part 1
KLR-zin's write-up (good pics) of the L-Mod, jetting, and needle installation, Part 2

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 7
Importance 3
Cost 4

Mercedes Valve:

The Mercedes Valve mod, also known as the PCV mod, installs a Mercedes turbo charger valve or a PCV in the crankcase vent line. What does it do? Ah, there's a controversy. Measurably, nothing. Arguably, it reduces pumping losses. Some people swear they can feel a difference. Wanna try it? Do ya feel lucky, punk? Well, do ya?

Discussion of the Mercedes Valve mod

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 2
Importance 2
Cost 2

Thermo-Bob:

Unlike even the lowly Yugo, the KLR's cooling system has no bypass circuit. What that effectively means is that there really isn't any regulation of the temperature other than it can't get too hot. The Thermo-Bob adds a bypass circuit and regulates the coolant temperature between two pretty narrow limits.

General discussion, some experiences and opinions
And more...


Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 4
Importance 4
Cost 7

T-Mod:

The carburetor on the KLR has a bowl vent tube that runs down to the bottom of the frame on the Gen 1 bikes. The Gen 2 bike's vent runs up under the seat. The purpose of the vent is to insure that gas can flow freely into the bowl through the needle valve. If the vent gets blocked, then the gas is trying to flow into a pressurized chanmber and it pretty much can't. The bike will run like crap. The most common failure of the vent occurs when you ride a Gen 1 bike through a puddle. Water gets up into the vent line and is held in place by a slight vacuum ('cuz the vent line inside diameter is much larger than the orifice that the gas flows through - eventually it would clear itself, but...). That's why the vent line was raised on the Gen 2 bikes. Only thing is, it can still get blocked. That failure mode is when the thing topples over and gas flows from the bowl into the vent line. Once the bike is upright the gas can sit in the vent line, very effectively blocking it.

The T-mod is done by installing a "T" fitting in the vent line and adding a bit of tubing to either extend down or to extend under the seat, depending upon your model.

We don't have pictures of the actual mod, but here's a good discussion (with pictures of KLRs in mid-stream).

Difficulty 1
Satisfaction 3
Importance 4
Cost 1

You've broken your choke while you were messing with your carb:

It happens. The plastic barrel is fragile. The options are to replace it with another stock barrel, with a metal barrel, or install a KLX250 choke or some such clever alternative.

Here's a good thread on the topic, with links and stuff
south's really neat solution

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 3
Importance 5
Cost 3

The low buck exhaust mod:

Stand behind the KLR and notice that tiny hole in that big can. Fire it up and admire that warbling exhaust note. After market exhaust systems can fix all that, but so can this inexpensive mod to the stock exhaust while retaining the spark arrestor feature and keeping your wallet nice and fat. The result will be a moderately freer flowing exhaust, a bit throatier note, but not obnoxiously loud.

There are write-ups and comments aplenty, but Snakeshack's post sums it up nicely.
UK trailer guy's impressive job

Difficulty 5
Satisfaction 5
Importance 3
Cost 5

Slightly higher low buck exhaust mod:

This mod puts a muffler from a GSXR 1000 on the KLR. Lighter in weight by far, legally quiet, and quite a bit freer flowing than the stock exhaust.To add icing to the cake, there's just something mildy naughty about putting Suzuki crotch rocket stuff on the KLR...

This thread is long, but it takes you through the R&D, culiminating in the totally bitchin' final version.

Difficulty 7
Satisfaction 5
Importance 3
Cost 7

The 685 Kit:

Whether you've got a Gen 2 that uses oil (most likely a 2008, you poor bastard) or you want to have a bit more power, the 685 kit can be the ticket. The kit is a piston, rings, and some gaskets. You provide the bored cylinder and the labor.

This thread is a walk-through, with discussion and videos.
A thread with some discussions

Difficulty
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 10


The PUMPER Carb!:

KLRs are weak and puny and lack throttle response. OK,OK, so they're not puny. The CVK40 carb, though, has a slide that is operated by vacuum. That means there is a bit of a lag in the throttle response. Some of us like to pretend it's like turbo lag and the power is just building. We also put cards in our spokes as kids, but I digress. There have been a number of high-dollar and high-effort remedies to this issue that involve expensive carburetors (usually flat slide/direct pull type carburetors) where the fitment is an issue. Not so with this one - it's a CVK40 pumper carb, and it's a drop-in replacement. Read on for enlightenment; it's a real gas...

MacG's pumper card mod, with discussion

Difficulty 5
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 7


Replacing Fuel and Vent Elbows:

outdoort brought this issue up. It's a well known fact that Kawasaki never changes anything on the KLR650, much to everyone's chagrin. Except when they do and don't tell us about it. It turns out that the fuel and vent elbows on the 2012 and up carbs are pressed in place. If ya bust one it's a 'WTF do I do now?' moment. outdoort figured it out and told us about it in this thread:

outdoort's fix for a broken fuel elbow

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Tom [email protected]

“She went out slowly. The way she did it hadn’t been learned at business college.” -Philip Marlowe

“'Why' and 'How' are words so important they cannot be too often used.” -Napoleon Bonaparte


Sting like a butterfly.

Last edited by Tom Schmitz; 04-04-2015 at 11:27 PM.
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post #2 of 3 Old 03-31-2012, 10:20 AM Thread Starter
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This is Page Two of Common Mods and Issues, dealing with Chassis and Suspension. Covers things that are hooked to the frame or that go boingy-boingy..

Common Mods and Issues, Page One (Engine)
Common Mods and Issues, Page Three (Electrical)

Chassis

Cheap Seat:

The stock seat is pretty uncomfortable for most people; many find that severe butt-ache sets in after about 45 minutes. There are lots of seats out there that improve the comfort level. This is a basic seat mod to widen the seat with some stiffer foam. Yes, it's a rip-off of the Corbin flat, but we call it simultaneous invention...

Cheap seat

Difficulty 6
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 5

Front Fender:

The front fender, especially on the Gen2s, is big. While it affords good protection from spray, it also allows the bike to get blown all over the place. A common solution is to install a supermoto fender from Acerbis or Cycra or use a KTM fender. With a fork brace installed it is even possible to install the fender down low just like those odd German bikes that cost so much. If you don't want to be a Freddie, Fender of the supermoto variety is the way to go.

Installing the Acerbis, with a good photo comparison to stock
Modifying the stock Gen2 fender
Installation of a lowered fender, from a member's blog

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Nerf/Crash Bars and Skid Plates:

Ok, it's like this, see. If you're going to ride that Gen2 in the dirt, you can spend a coupla benjies to get some crash bars, or you can spend a coupla benjies to replace the plastics, THEN buy the crash bars. Your choice. On all KLRs a dump in the dirt, a biff off the berm, can cause radiator damage. That can leave you standing beside the bike in a puddle of ...coolant. You can prevent that with some crash bars. Your choice; it can be a long walk home. The stock KLR skid plate is a, um, joke. Get a real one. A squished frame tube or a holed case is really bad ju-ju.

General discussion, some experiences and opinions
Happy Trails on a Gen1

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 8

Foot Pegs:
by Lockjaw

For some reason, Kawasaki decided to put Extra Slick ™ foot pegs on the KLR. They are slippery even in the rain; they are especially scary off road. There are many options for replacing the stock pegs. It can cost anywhere from $20 - $100. Good, cheap pegs can be had on eBay or from vendors (even Amazon) for about $20. They are made in China and come without springs. You can add springs, but it isn't really necessary. Metal serrated pegs are less comfortable on long rides or when standing for long periods of time (think bruises in the arches of your feet), but well worth the minor pain.

It is a good idea to put some decent bolts in when you change the pegs...cheap and if you're going to be standing on them, you want a strong base.

Discussion of E-Bay pegs
And another, with pictures


Difficulty 1 (takes literally five minutes)
Satisfaction 8
Importance 4 (8 if you want to do any off-roading)
Cost 2-5 (depending on your approach)

Lowering the foot pegs:

The KLR is a tall bike, but the on-bike ergos were sorta designed for a mid-size person. Some of us are a bit lanky, and most of us are old. Some of us tall, old farts ride in an NSAIDS induced euphoria. Put the two together and ya wind up wishing for a bit more leg room. Over the years there have been some infamous foot-peg lowering projects, but the latest is clean, simple, and reasonable. It should be noted that lowered pegs have the potential for getting knocked about off-road, so take care if serious off-roading is in your future. Carry some extra bolts just in case.

A good discussion of the need (pay particular attention to post 7 and on)

Difficulty 1
Satisfaction 7
Importance 6, if your NSAIDS bill is over $20/mo
Cost 4

Side case installation:

The KLR is an adventure motorcycle, among other things. What's an adventure without a way to take all yer junk along for the ride? If you need some ideas about how and what to install for side cases, here are a couple of threads by some really good fabricators!

Mr. Miyagi's mad MIG manufacturing skills
Colorado Tom does Pelican cases
SD Charlie's top box - a foray into fantastic fabrication!
And everything you ever wanted to know about the different options and who can carry the most beer

Difficulty 7
Satisfaction 7
Importance 6
Cost 6-8, depending on what you use

Sub frame bolt upgrade:

The KLR's sub frame is held in place by four bolts. A common issue is the shearing of these bolts under heavy loads as well as the loosening of said bolts due to vibration. Loc-Tite is a friend indeed here! If you're planning on carrying heavy loads, then you may want to consider an upgrade to the bolts. Kaswasaki thought it was a good idea, and upgraded the bolts on the Gen2 bikes (who says Ma Kawi doesn't listen?). There are a couple of routes to go, one being a visit to the local hardware store for higher grade bolts and a simple swap-out, complete with Loc-Tite. Fast, easy, and cheap. Another somewhat more complicated option is to install the "Drill-through" bolt upgrade at the frame backbone with upgraded bolts in the other two spots. Here Josbek shows how to do the drill-through.

Josbek's post on the bolt upgrade

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Left side mirror and choke relocation:

They say that Weebles wobble, but they don't fall down. The KLR is another matter. It does fall down when you having fun in the muck and the mire, and stuff can break. Here's a mod to help prevent some damage before it occurs, thanks to LoneRider. By relocating the mirror mount and the choke you can make the switch housing far less vulnerable in a get-off. It puts the choke lever in a bit handier position, too.

LoneRider's mirror and choke relocation

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 3

Cruise Control:

Adventure touring. Long days in the saddle. Miles of riding to get to miles of fun. Right hand cramps are common; here are some ideas for wracked right wrist rectification.

moriver's clever and inexpensive cruise control
aaronrkelly found this bit of kit; it gets kudos from forum members
Some general discussion of cruise control options
More discussion (gad, this is a popular topic)
It's unknown who was the first to do this, but we give props to theotherbigjoe for the bungie cord

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 2

The Wheat Whacker Mod:

An odd sounding name for a cool mod that increases the storage area under the fairing and gets the windscreen a little more vertical, all in one swell foop. The idea is to cut a slit in the fairing, then rotate the windscreen forward. This makes the windscreen more vertical and deflects air a bit higher, plus you get an additional storage area above the instrument cluster.

Here's a link to our thread on the mod
And here's a good post on the how-to from Curtis in Texas

Curtis also shows how to exploit the extra storage area.

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Rear Left Side Storage:

Storage on the KLR is at a premium. We build tool tubes and look for handlebar bags, side cases, tank bags, the Wheat Whacker, et al. Once you've removed the evaporative control canister from the rear left side, there's a big space left! Here's a clever idea on how to build some storage back there.

gaucho10's featured fine fiberglass fabrication

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 3
Cost 2

Fixing The Sticky Trip Meter:

The trip meter is pretty important on the KLR, 'cuz it got no gas gauge. You need to know when you are about to go on reserve so you can flip it over and get on down to the gas station and fill her up. And we know how important it is to frequently change the gas in these things; that's where all the fun comes. The trip meter in the Gen 2s is a bit balky from time to time and sometimes it's just plain stuck. Push real hard when it's stuck and you might wind up with a busticated unit. Bad ju-ju. Captain campfire (as of this writing) created a clever correction to this confounded condundrum!

campfire's fix for the sticky trip meter

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 4
Importance 4
Cost 0



Suspension

Rear Spring Swap:

On both the Gen1 and Gen2 bikes there is often a need for a stronger spring, and there are a couple of manufacturers that can provide springs in different rates. Upgrading the spring can be just the ticket to improving the KLR's off-road and load carrying performance. The suspension is very slightly different, but not enough to make a difference in the spring swap process. Some special tools are required, but it's not real difficult especially when you have a good set of documentation to go by. Aron31 set out to upgrade the spring on his Gen2 and did a great job of documenting the process.

Aron31's write up on how to install a beefier spring

Difficulty 5
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 7

Suspension Package Mod:

If you and your stuff weigh more than about 220 pounds, you are probably going to find the KLR's suspension lacking. Not to worry; there are solutions. There are several good rear shocks available on the aftermarket and better springs for the front.

Suspension package installation
Emulators or Intiminators?

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 9

Stock vs. progressive springs:

An effective front suspension mod is the installation of progressively wound springs. Buildit has done some excellent work comparing the characteristics and performance of the two different springs.

Buildit's thread comparing the springs

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 7

Tom [email protected]

“She went out slowly. The way she did it hadn’t been learned at business college.” -Philip Marlowe

“'Why' and 'How' are words so important they cannot be too often used.” -Napoleon Bonaparte


Sting like a butterfly.

Last edited by Tom Schmitz; 07-09-2014 at 07:41 PM.
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post #3 of 3 Old 03-31-2012, 10:34 AM Thread Starter
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This is Page Three of Common Mods and Issues, dealing with Electrical. Covers things that run on the magic smoke.

Common Mods and Issues, Page One (Engine)
Common Mods and Issues, Page Two (Chassis and Suspension)

Electrical

LED Conversion Mod:
By Adventure-Moto

The KLR does not come with a big alternator; there's not a lot of head room left to run accessories like heated clothing, auxiliary lights, Marguerita blenders, and such like that. You can get a fair amount of power reserve by getting rid of the incandescent lights in favor of LED units. Adventure-Moto tells you how to go about this mod.


Adventure-Moto's LED conversion


Difficulty 1
Satisfaction 4
Importance 4
Cost 5

Electrical System Access:

We live in the electronic age, and electronic stuff needs sparky juice to work. Sometimes we have to recharge our goodies, too. And what about the luxury of a heated vest for those cold winter rides? In every car you'll find cigarette lighters and/or power ports, but on our trusty steed there is nary a bare wire to be had. Well, the Gen1 bikes had the city light circuit, but...

Anyway, here's a pretty comprehensive write-up on getting access to your KLR's electrical system for your accessories.

Adventure-Moto's Electrical System Mod

Difficulty 5
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 5

Electrical Console:

Taking the power access to the next level, here's gaucho10's electrical console. It's designed to not only provide power and charging points, but to provide some protection from the elements. Witness gaucho10's impressive glassing skills and creative fabrication, all culiminating in a professional end result!

gaucho10 Electrical Console

Difficulty 5
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 5


Adding an oil pressure warning light:

Let's face it. Some KLRs are known to use oil. Here's a slick mod that will add an oil pressure warning light, thanks to T748 (Tom).

Here's Tom's write up on installing the oil pressure switch.

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Tail light mod:

Because they get in the way of a bag, because they got busted off, because the rubber rotted and they fell off, or just because, you may want to tuck your tail lights out of the way. Here's one way to do it.

DXKLR's tail light mod

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 4
Cost 3

Stebel horn installation:

The ACME kite and rocket company. Whoooosh! Meep-meep! Meep-meep! The stock KLR horn may be good for teasing Wile E. Coyote, but it's the pits for warning that driver that you're already where they want to be. It's also been compared to a wet duck fart... That can be fixed with the installation of a Stebel horn, as it produces about 140dB of WONNNK-WONNNK! Scroll down five posts in the link below to see Snakeboy66's installation on a Gen 1 where he separates the compressor and the horn, and sardog1's neat installation on a Gen 2.

Snakeboy66 and sardog1's Stebel creations
larry31's Clean WOLO installation

Difficulty 3
Satisfaction 5
Importance 5
Cost 5

Safety Switch Bypass:

Yuuup! Those pesky safety switches, designed to keep you from an untimely demise while engaged in the hazardous activity of starting your bike up. The only problem is that they can fail and leave you with a very quiet bike. At least you can hear the birds and the bees out in the solitude of the backcountry while you try and figure out what your next move is. You'll also note that whenever someone comes on the forum with a 'it won't start' or 'it cuts out' issue, they'll get asked if they have done this mod. Here's how to disable them. WARNING! WARNING! This is very dangerous! Understand the danger!

This is for the Gen 2 bikes, complete with a warning of the dire consequences
A bit of discussion
Daddyjoe's solution for bypassing, yet retaining the function with a switch
Talk of how to do it on the Gen 1, but no pictures
Marknet's Gen 1 instructions

Difficulty 1
Satisfaction 3
Importance 5
Cost 1

Improving Stock Lighting

It was a dark and stormy night. A maiden screamed. A ship appeared on the horizon. But the KLR rider couldn't see either one because the headlight is so crappy and he wound up running over the maiden and crashing into the ship. Here's Damocles' take on a significant improvement to the Gen 1 stock lighting.

Damocles' post regarding the IPF Superbulb and harness from TPI

Difficulty 2
Satisfaction 5
Importance 7
Cost 6

Auxiliary Lighting:

The forward lighting on the Gen 1 bikes leaves a lot to be desired. From the factory, the headlight is about as minimally satisfactory as is legal. The Gen 2 bikes got a much-improved headlight, but some feel there is still room for improvement. Add to this the fact that even the Gen 2's higher output electrical system is hard pressed to keep up with auxiliary lighting and what we've got is room for some creative modding. Read on to become truly enlightened; there are some bright ideas in the following!

flash started a thread on the Gen 2
A bit of discussion on the merits of HID, along with SLO-KLR's installation
Sankeboy66's thread on LED auxiliary lights, with much good input
Paper's thread on installing ADVMonster LEDs
Adventure-Moto has some low mounted LEDs
planalp adds a conspicuity light

Difficulty 4
Satisfaction 5
Importance 7
Cost 2-8

Tom [email protected]

“She went out slowly. The way she did it hadn’t been learned at business college.” -Philip Marlowe

“'Why' and 'How' are words so important they cannot be too often used.” -Napoleon Bonaparte


Sting like a butterfly.

Last edited by Tom Schmitz; 11-07-2014 at 09:35 PM.
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