Need troubleshooting help? Fan not working - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods For maintaining, repair or modifications of Generation 1 KLR's. 2007 and earlier.

 
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post #1 of 10 Old 12-12-2013, 05:19 PM Thread Starter
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Question Need troubleshooting help? Fan not working

2007KLR. 3700 miles

Went for a ride, outside temp was cool enough to keep bike happy on flats, no issues on rd & hwy. Once the KLR was placed under slower pace (less air flow) and workload (climbing). I got a whiff of the radiator fluid and caught the temp gauge at "H"! Stopped immediately! Removed tank, tried grounding-out the “fan switch’ to a solid ground (lower left radiator side), while the power was on, resulted in “NO” fan turning on. Checked the fuse on the right side of KLR (radiator coolant side), 10A fuse bulb not broken. Chased down wires and found no issues (visually). Put her back together, fired her up and let her idle until near a safe hot temp where the fan should have turned ON…again fan did “NOT” turn on. With limited options & knowledge out on the trail and frustration, I returned straight back to the black top, picked up the pace and the cold air kept her cool all the way home.
I know I need to check/troubleshoot and/or replace the following.
1. Thermostat (right side of cylinder head housing)
2. Fan switch (bottom left of radiator)
3. Fan relay (Don’t know exact location, only wire colors)
4. Fan motor
New to the KLR world, great at turning wrenches, not all that great at the electrical. Any links, stickys, videos will help out greatly.

Thanks..young KLR student..
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post #2 of 10 Old 12-12-2013, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santana View Post
2007KLR. 3700 miles

Went for a ride, outside temp was cool enough to keep bike happy on flats, no issues on rd & hwy. Once the KLR was placed under slower pace (less air flow) and workload (climbing). I got a whiff of the radiator fluid and caught the temp gauge at "H"! Stopped immediately! Removed tank, tried grounding-out the “fan switch’ to a solid ground (lower left radiator side), while the power was on, resulted in “NO” fan turning on. Checked the fuse on the right side of KLR (radiator coolant side), 10A fuse bulb not broken. Chased down wires and found no issues (visually). Put her back together, fired her up and let her idle until near a safe hot temp where the fan should have turned ON…again fan did “NOT” turn on. With limited options & knowledge out on the trail and frustration, I returned straight back to the black top, picked up the pace and the cold air kept her cool all the way home.
I know I need to check/troubleshoot and/or replace the following.
1. Thermostat (right side of cylinder head housing)
2. Fan switch (bottom left of radiator)
3. Fan relay (Don’t know exact location, only wire colors)
4. Fan motor
New to the KLR world, great at turning wrenches, not all that great at the electrical. Any links, stickys, videos will help out greatly.

Thanks..young KLR student..
# 3, or # 4, I shouldn't wonder!

Click on this little square below, and you should view a wiring diagram of the fan circuitry:



[Don't know why, but . . . I got a little SQUARE instead of an image.]

Be sure your fan fuse is good, ELECTRICALLY. Appearances can be deceiving.

I rule out # 1; the thermostat's not involved.

# 2? Since the fan does not activate when the lead to the thermal fan switch is grounded effectively, no evidence points to culpability of the fan switch.

# 3? You can jump this relay to test the circuit; also--you have a ride-along backup for substitution; your starter circuit relay is IDENTICAL, if you want to swap 'em for testing.

# 4? Apply + 12 VDC to the appropriate terminal (from the wiring diagram above) to see if this thing then goes 'round.

[If you jump WHITE to BLUE, you'll bypass the fan relay and apply current directly to the fan motor.]

Good luck!

CAVEAT: Generation 1 only analysis and discussion; Generation 2 don't even have no stinkin' fan relay!

Last edited by Damocles; 12-12-2013 at 06:24 PM.
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post #3 of 10 Old 12-12-2013, 06:19 PM Thread Starter
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Thx Damocles, for us thicker skulled humans, (#4 Fan motor) if you can elaborate on the how to “Jumping” a relay is done. Do I cut the “white & blue” wires and splice them together as one? Then turn on power to see if fan turns?
# 3 Fan relay, (again not electrical savvy) when swapping the starter circuit relay for testing of the “fan relay”. I am assuming that I plug in the “fan line” into the “starter circuit relay”, correct?
After doing plugging into the starter relay, what is next? Turing ignition key on? Starting the engine and idling back to fan running temp? Just don’t know what is the next step into confirming or checking “fan relay”…Sorry
Thanks again…I figure if I can learn this now from you guys, it will save my ass in the real world and I can pass the knowledge on to others…
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post #4 of 10 Old 12-13-2013, 06:25 AM
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As I posted, Santana:
Quote:
[If you jump WHITE to BLUE, you'll bypass the fan relay and apply current directly to the fan motor.]
The word, "jump," means to connect, electrically, temporarily; as with a conducting wire.

Kinda hard to explain in words. The fan works when the THERMAL FAN SWITCH in the bottom of the radiator closes its contacts (happens at about 201-degree F. coolant temperature). This closure connects one side (RED/WHITE wire) of an electromagnetic coil in the fan relay to ground (the other side is permanently connected to + 12 VDC; WHITE wire), activating the relay to close its contacts. When the fan relay contacts close, 12 volts DC is applied to the fan motor, activating the fan.

So . . . if you connect, temporarily, WHITE and BLUE wires in the diagram, the fan motor should activate. If not, the fan motor or its connections may be defective.

If the fan motor does operate when you jump WHITE and BLUE, but NOT when you ground the RED/WHITE lead to the thermal fan switch, the fan relay may be inoperative.

As mentioned, you can SUBSTITUTE the starter circuit relay for the fan relay to test for a faulty component; if your bike starts, you know the starter circuit relay works.

What are you studying? You might ask an electrical/electronic engineering student for some help, or an experienced motorcyclist. A volt/ohm meter might come in handy, as well as a Service Manual (the Clymer version is comprehensive and stands alone; Kawasaki KLR600 and KLR650 Supplement (two manuals) are required if you want to use the manufacturer's literature).

Good luck!

Last edited by Damocles; 12-13-2013 at 06:28 AM.
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post #5 of 10 Old 12-13-2013, 07:02 AM
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Summarizing, Santana; if you ground the lead to your thermal fan switch, and the fan does NOT activate, then you have a problem with one or more of the following:

Power circuitry (i.e., fan fuse and/or connections).

Fan motor.

Fan relay.

Jumping WHITE and BLUE will tell whether the problem resides in the fan motor; an operational fan will activate when so connected.

If the fan turns when WHITE and BLUE are connected, but NOT when the thermal fan switch lead is grounded, the . . . the problem resides in the FAN RELAY.

You can remove-and-replace fan relay and starter circuit relay, exchanging these identical components to identify a defective one or to confirm an operational one.

FORGET ABOUT the ignition switch; the fan circuitry is independent of the ignition circuitry.

As mentioned, I left the thermal fan switch out of the discussion, because you have no evidence it's defective. If you DO suspect the thermal fan switch, put it in a pot of boiling water on the stove and see if its contacts close.

If the discussion remains confusing and makes no sense, you could print out a copy of the wiring diagram and take it with your bike to 'most any service station, garage, or bike shop, the technicians present should be able to diagnose, if not repair, your fan circuit problem.
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post #6 of 10 Old 12-21-2013, 09:08 PM Thread Starter
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As always you guys are such a great helping hand. My issue is fixed. This was my issue and may help "newbies" as myself figure out the problem.

When I did find out that the fan stopped working, seat and tank off, the first thing we did was ground the fan switch and then moved to the actual 10A bulb fuse. When two of us looked at the bulb fuse visually, we didnt see a break in the stock fuse ( stock fuse was not a straight line fuse, this one has a "Z" shape to it. It looked normal to us, but when I did take it out in the garage, i took it out and physically held it up to a bright light behind it. Low and behold a very fine break was found in the middle of it, as fine as a thin thin thin baby hair. Replaced the original burnt bulb with the spare bulb fuse, now knowing that it was bad, and the fan is back to normal operation.

Moral of my story, take the bulb out, hold to the sun or a light to actually find the small break or just replace with a spare. Also, buy the straight lined 10A bulb fuses as replacements, which will easier to verify if burnt or not....

I feel stupid, but it's a lesson well learned and will never happen again... Ride safe my brothers........
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post #7 of 10 Old 12-21-2013, 09:44 PM
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Glad you got it fixed, Santana!

As previously mentioned,
Quote:
Be sure your fan fuse is good, ELECTRICALLY. Appearances can be deceiving.
This axiom goes for ALL fuses.

The more industrious convert to BLADE fuses; "one of these days," so will I!

Best wishes.
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post #8 of 10 Old 12-21-2013, 11:55 PM
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Always, always use a load to confirm that the fuse is good. Even an ohmmeter can fool one if the fuse is partially damaged/loose inside. I think every old tech has had this problem with these Buss type (glass tube) fuses.



Quote:
Originally Posted by santana View Post
As always you guys are such a great helping hand. My issue is fixed. This was my issue and may help "newbies" as myself figure out the problem.

When I did find out that the fan stopped working, seat and tank off, the first thing we did was ground the fan switch and then moved to the actual 10A bulb fuse. When two of us looked at the bulb fuse visually, we didnt see a break in the stock fuse ( stock fuse was not a straight line fuse, this one has a "Z" shape to it. It looked normal to us, but when I did take it out in the garage, i took it out and physically held it up to a bright light behind it. Low and behold a very fine break was found in the middle of it, as fine as a thin thin thin baby hair. Replaced the original burnt bulb with the spare bulb fuse, now knowing that it was bad, and the fan is back to normal operation.

Moral of my story, take the bulb out, hold to the sun or a light to actually find the small break or just replace with a spare. Also, buy the straight lined 10A bulb fuses as replacements, which will easier to verify if burnt or not....

I feel stupid, but it's a lesson well learned and will never happen again... Ride safe my brothers........
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post #9 of 10 Old 12-22-2013, 12:46 AM
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Mine has blown a fuse in the past.

I also had a problem with the connection at the fuse switch. Dirty/corrosion.

Glad you got it fixed and it was easy.

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post #10 of 10 Old 12-24-2013, 02:18 AM
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I know your issue is fixed, Thought I'd post this link for other if they have a similar issue. There are other news articles on this web page as well. http://www.klr650.marknet.us/tech-coolingfan.html
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