Front wheel grease nipple? - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods For maintaining, repair or modifications of Generation 1 KLR's. 2007 and earlier.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 Old 08-10-2014, 06:23 PM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,481
Front wheel grease nipple?

Ever wonder what was the original intention for the raised boss on the front wheel hub? It looks about the size and shape of a grease nipple boss.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/nb9voz4hli...ple%20boss.jpg

Arrow: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ie60w6r1q6...le%20boss2.jpg

Last edited by Normk; 08-10-2014 at 06:54 PM.
Normk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 08-10-2014, 07:36 PM
5th Gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,706
Some day, I'm sure you'll learn to post images directly, Normk!

Damocles is online now  
post #3 of 9 Old 08-10-2014, 07:47 PM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,481
Unlikely apparently. I've tried various techniques and followed the instructions offered by several people but not working. It turned into such a PITA that I decided it was either link or stop posting. Most groups to which I belong allow photos to simply be linked and posted but not this one for some reason.

Thanks for posting the photo.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Damocles View Post
Some day, I'm sure you'll learn to post images directly, Normk!

Normk is offline  
 
post #4 of 9 Old 08-12-2014, 04:40 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Normk View Post
Ever wonder what was the original intention for the raised boss on the front wheel hub? It looks about the size and shape of a grease nipple boss.
I am sure you didn't just drop this on the table with nothing in mind. So, what are you thinking? Install a zerk and fill the cavity with grease which would flow directly to the ball cages? I did that for my swingarm bearings and they have been working over 100k miles. But, for the wheel bearings, you have a chance to get to them every time you take a tire off.
GoMotor is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 08-12-2014, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,481
It's actually coming at the question from the opposite end because I think a grease nipple in the hub would be a bad idea in a high speed wheel. Filling the hub with grease (assuming one side sealed bearings as in stock) would likely, almost certainly, push the seals out of one or both bearings. The grease escaping would spray out and slide up the rotor.

If one has installed double sealed bearings as most of us do, the grease would apply hydraulic pressure to the bearings which would side load them and might push the inner seals into the bearing separator.

I'm interested as to what might have been the intention. Adding oil by way of a plug, as do some heavy truck hubs, would not seem likely as it would tend to wick out between axle and inner race.

Odd location for either grease nipple or plug so it bothers me as the provision for something seems indicated.

We did some tech days to install a bunch of rear suspension grease nipples but don't think I'm ambitious enough to do this bike. ;-)

I'm wondering if you'd do the nipple install again? Huge amount of work to do the whole suspension.
Normk is offline  
post #6 of 9 Old 08-12-2014, 06:32 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by Normk View Post
.....................................We did some tech days to install a bunch of rear suspension grease nipples but don't think I'm ambitious enough to do this bike. ;-)

I'm wondering if you'd do the nipple install again? Huge amount of work to do the whole suspension.
Yes, I would and will install grease nipples in the swingarm and suspension on my backup KLR because it is also a pain to dis assemble for lubrication, inspection and replacement of the bearings.
GoMotor is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 08-13-2014, 11:12 AM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,481
Once the grease nipple install is done, it's very convenient but I think I can do mine more than 5 times for the time and effort so am procrastinating. IME, the big difference is being able to pump some grease in a few minutes rather than leaving it until some future time to do a complete disassemble.

Maybe we'll see this winter. It will be interesting to learn how you resolve the various positioning puzzles in order to place grease into the cavities without exposing the nipples to riding damage but still be able to access without disassembling. I posted photos of the locations we used on previous bikes but don't recall to which sites.

I'll have a look to see if have the photos somewhere as they may be helpful to someone and your comments would be of interest.
Normk is offline  
post #8 of 9 Old 08-13-2014, 11:51 AM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
I took no photos of the zerk locations on my first KLR. I do recall buying a selection of fittings with several angles for convenient access and locating the center fitting on the uni-trac arm on top so it would not get scraped off.

It all worked because I can grease my suspension and haven't lost any zerks even though my skid plate looks like it has been used for target practice with hammers.
GoMotor is offline  
post #9 of 9 Old 08-13-2014, 12:06 PM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Chilliwack, BC, Canada
Posts: 1,481
For someone contemplating installing grease nipples: the problems are:

1) where to place the grease nipples so that a grease coupler can access them without disassembly.

2) Locating the grease passages to allow the grease to enter the bearing. The bearings are "Bremin type", which is to say that they are a needle bearing caged in a thin outer shell and without ian inner race. This was a common configuration for alternator rear bearings at one time so that may illustrate for someone. The bearing needles run on a heavy inner sleeve through which the attachment bolt passes.

It is the bolt to sleeve which usually seizes so this area requires packing with grease to avoid that nasty seizure. Of course the grease won't pass through the sleeve so must be directed into the end of the bearing.

Not as easy a task as it might seem.

Talking about this has convinced me that I need to do mine, just out of pride but would be interested in anyone's experience. Sometimes there's an obvious solution which escapes one.
Normk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Balancing The Front Wheel powderaddict 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 43 08-06-2012 10:09 PM
front wheel removal klarkekent 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 10 08-25-2010 10:21 AM
How much for an 18" front wheel Kermit 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 8 04-15-2007 03:09 PM
why the 18" front wheel Tazman KLR & Other Motorcycle Related Discussion 11 10-12-2006 12:47 AM
why the 18" front Wheel Tazman KLR & Other Motorcycle Related Discussion 2 10-01-2006 02:59 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome