First time DIY tire change, need advice - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods For maintaining, repair or modifications of Generation 1 KLR's. 2007 and earlier.

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post #1 of 20 Old 08-13-2014, 02:16 AM Thread Starter
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First time DIY tire change, need advice

Youtubber RebelYell91 made a good video on doing a rear
youtube dot com slash watch?v=YphcSlXip5Y
youtube dot com slash watch?v=wcG241dlTCk

and front tire change
youtube.com/watch?v=dA6w6M-LW7M
youtube dot com slash watch?v=W7OKAYwV0Cs

But that bike is a 2009. Mine is a 2007. Can I still use those videos for a how to?

By the way, the rear tire is the one I'm about to change. The front has at least a couple thousand to go
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post #2 of 20 Old 08-13-2014, 05:38 AM
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A Modest Proposal

A modest proposal; you might view this thread on this webste (legacy from LoneRider):

http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=12603

Only one of many good video clips on tire changing.

That said, during and after your adventure in tire changing, you will lust for a Baja No Pinch Tire Tool ( http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=35649 ), IMHO!

Suggestion: Have one or more extra inner tubes on hand, and a patch kit. Dish soap or Windex remains your friend. At least three tire irons/spoons may come in handy. Nothing wrong with a Bead Buddy.

I salute your courage in attempting to DIY; you will develop skills and techniques that may return you safely from the savage wilds, some day!

Last edited by Damocles; 08-13-2014 at 05:40 AM.
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post #3 of 20 Old 08-13-2014, 06:05 AM
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Breaking the bead on your old tire is probably not going to be quite as easy as it was in that video. Chances are, it will be more of a profanity-inducing affair. You might want to try to find some specific "bead-breaking" tutorials to watch.

When putting the new tire on, it will save you a lot of grief if you come up with a way to keep the "unworked" portion of the tire bead down into the drop center of the rim so you have more play when working the tire over the rim.

I don't use the Bead Buddy, but this video explains the process better than I can with words alone. If you dont' do this, you'll be fighting/forcing the tire over the rim most of the way around the wheel. Not only does that make the job ten times as hard, but you run the risk of damaging the tire bead using excessive and unnecessary force to get the job done if you can get it on at all.

While concentrating on getting the tire over the wheel, be cognizant of the vulnerable inner tube that is within nipping range of your tire tools.

When you're done and air up the tire, make sure you do a close visual inspection to insure the bead is fully seated and concentric all the way around on both sides with no "gaps."


Alas! I was unaware of Damocles' response whilst preparing mine. You should learn a lot of tips/tricks from his referenced thread, uncluding all of what was noted above.....




Last edited by planalp; 08-13-2014 at 06:10 AM.
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post #4 of 20 Old 08-13-2014, 06:10 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the advice! I have heard of how soap helps and I do have three tire spoons
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post #5 of 20 Old 08-13-2014, 07:23 AM
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Be mindful of the tube!

The first time I did a tire change, I did it with just the tools I carry on the bike to simulate field conditions.... I pinched two tubes before getting it right.
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post #6 of 20 Old 08-14-2014, 05:03 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyxon View Post
Be mindful of the tube!

The first time I did a tire change, I did it with just the tools I carry on the bike to simulate field conditions.... I pinched two tubes before getting it right.
Thank you!
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post #7 of 20 Old 08-14-2014, 11:54 AM
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Breaking the bead can be a real challenge depending on the tire, wheel and corrosives. Sometimes one has to work back and forth over a section while using lube until the lube penetrates over enough area to release the bead. Once one section of bead drops out of the usual mounting area, the remainder will usually come free quite easily.

It is well to use a wire brush &/or scotch brite pad to clean the seating/sealing area to promote easier seating and sealing. As for lubes, most soaps aren't that great a choice because they don't lubricate very well and since many/most are caustic which attacks aluminum. In a pinch, try WD40 as it will penetrate and makes things quite slippery. I'm of mixed feelings but have used it quite a bit with the conclusion that it dries up and causes no apparent issues at all.

My favorite is rim grease as used by tire shops to promote tough mounting and help to seal a leaky bead area.

IME, the most common mistakes are not getting the tire bead into the wheel's drop center area to provide enough "slack" to allow the other side to pass over the wheel. As others have referenced, dealing with tubes is an art.

If you happen to be near Chilliwack, feel free to drop by and can give you a hand.
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post #8 of 20 Old 08-15-2014, 03:10 AM Thread Starter
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Can't get valve stem back into hole

Did my first DIY tire change (rear) Thursday morning. Everything went fine until I went to put the valve stem back through the hole on the rim. When I tried to pull the tire away from the rim enough to get my fingers in there, the other side of the tire gets in the way. I tried using a tire spoon to stop that from happening but then I can't pull the tire away from the rim enough to get my fingers in there to put the valve stem back through the hole. I ended up having to take it to my mechanic to get it done.

What can I do about this? Perhaps use some kind of spreader tool to push the tire away enough to get my fingers in there? If that's a good idea, what spreader tool should I use?

EDIT
Would this work?
Ebay item number 321489580862

Last edited by Cloudchaser; 08-15-2014 at 03:16 AM.
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post #9 of 20 Old 08-15-2014, 03:30 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your reply! I used Windex, will try WD40 next time. Went fine until I got to the point of putting the valve stem back through the hole in the rim. Have started another thread about that. I appreciate your offer of help, but I'm in east Tennessee
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post #10 of 20 Old 08-15-2014, 03:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudchaser View Post
Did my first DIY tire change (rear) Thursday morning. Everything went fine until I went to put the valve stem back through the hole on the rim. When I tried to pull the tire away from the rim enough to get my fingers in there, the other side of the tire gets in the way. I tried using a tire spoon to stop that from happening but then I can't pull the tire away from the rim enough to get my fingers in there to put the valve stem back through the hole. I ended up having to take it to my mechanic to get it done.

What can I do about this? Perhaps use some kind of spreader tool to push the tire away enough to get my fingers in there? If that's a good idea, what spreader tool should I use?

EDIT
Would this work?
Ebay item number 321489580862
I don't expect you to follow the following advice, Cloudchaser, because apparently you haven't watched or researched the previous links provided you.

I'm NOT going to suggest you buy any special tools; even the No Pinch one; INSTEAD, WATCH THE FIRST MINUTE OF THIS TIRE INSTALLATION VIDEO:

http://www.dirtrider.com/features/ba...nch-tire-tool/

NEVER MIND THE TOOL; WATCH HOW HE SPEARS THE RIM WITH THE VALVE STEM.

Notice how the demonstrator puts the partly-inflated inner tube in the tire carcass, and FIRST THING, spears the rim hole with the valve stem and anchors it loosely with a valve stem nut.

Next, I shall AGAIN refer you to the videos previously presented you from a thread on THIS VERY WEBSITE:

http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=12603

If you should watch the Bridgestone videos, you'll observe another technique for inserting the valve stem in the rim; but only IF YOU BOTHER TO WATCH THE VIDEOS.

Finally, I'm going to tell you about a little magic tooL (maybe I WILL encourage a tool purchase!). It's a hand-width stick, with a short cable fastened to it in the middle. On the end of the cable is a threaded fitting; threads matching the interior threads of your valve stem. To use this jewel, you remove your valve stem core, snake the cable through the hole in the rim, and thread the fitting into the valve stem. Pull on the stick, and the cable pulls the valve stem into the rim. About $ 5 from Rocky Mountain ATV/MC, or at your friendly local Cycle Gear store.

I've got one, but will not trouble myself with a photograph for you, since you have ignored previous suggestions and guidance.

Thing is, Cloudchaser, forum members (including myself) are willing to help you, answer your questions, share experience and information and offer advice in your best interest. However, SOME EFFORT IS EXPECTED from you, as in exploiting the information you have been given.

If you find it easier to run to a mechanic than to click on a link and read it, or to allow a video clip to penetrate your consciousness, that's your choice. But, if you're going to ignore the help offered, why ask your questions here?

Note to moderators: Do what you will about this post. I do not believe I have violated any forum rules in expressing my opinion; I certainly did not intend to. I would simply like a poster to at least read, view, and consider best-effort information and advice, instead of ignoring it and regurgitating a previous question.

For Cloudchaser, best wishes and good luck with your motorcycle repair and maintenance; I mean that sincerely.
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