First time buying bike tires - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods For maintaining, repair or modifications of Generation 1 KLR's. 2007 and earlier.

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post #1 of 9 Old 10-22-2018, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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First time buying bike tires

Hello All,

This is my first time buying bike tires, I took the bike out on some really soft sand / dirt over the weekend and within 10 min laid the bike down because the back tire slid out from under me. Now normally I would have been fine but unfortunately not being used to such a big heavy bike when I put my foot down to try and stop it from falling it caught my boot under it and pulled me down with it. This caused me to twist my ankle and my knee an pretty much brought my entire day to a very quick end. I would like to avoid this problem in the future and it was advised to me to buy nobbie tires. I have picked out a set that I believe will fit my bike however I am unsure about the tubes. Please see the links below to the parts I picked out:

Front Tire:
https://www.denniskirk.com/kenda/k76...f?skuId=642074
80/100-21

Rear Tire:
https://www.denniskirk.com/kenda/k76...f?skuId=642414
130/90-17

Tube Strip front:
https://www.denniskirk.com/kenda/20-...prd/535199.sku

Tube Strip Rear:
https://www.denniskirk.com/kenda/16-...prd/535197.sku

Tube Front:
https://www.denniskirk.com/kenda/hea...prd/531729.sku

Tube Rear:
This is my biggest concern, I was not able to find a 130/90-17 tube for a decent price.
This is what I wanted to go with. https://www.denniskirk.com/irc/17-in....prd/54137.sku


I was only ordering from Dinnis kirk because it was the cheapest place for that specific model of tire at the time.

Thanks and have a great day,
Justin
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 07:13 AM
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Tread looks like pretty much an all-out knobby, to me, but I see it is DOT approved (rated in the 80 + MPH range).

Typically, knobbies wear down pretty quick on pavement, might be squirrely when pushed on slab twisties, maybe not the best in the world on rain-slick paved roads.

That said, they're about the best performers in mud and dirt; assume in sand also (no sand experience here).

Kenda TrakMaster IIs have proven versatile and relatively long-lived (for a knobby) in my experience; YMMV.

Wouldn't sweat the rear tube too much; I think a 17-inch approaching your tire width would work o.k.

DISCLAIMER: My opinions/perceptions only above; correction/clarification/opposing views welcomed.

Let us know how your tires perform!
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post #3 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 07:20 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply! I'm aware these are probably not so great on the pavement but I haven't register my bike so I won't be taking it on the road, it's stricktly a trail bike for now. If I can get one more person to agree that the rear tube should be fine then I will gladly pull the trigger and buy all this. On another note, if I wanted to buy new wheels how would I go about doing that? I'm interested in trying out other sizes that may have more tire options in the future.

Thanks,
Justin
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post #4 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 09:16 AM
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For alternate-sized wheels, just send some stock hubs and a thousand or so dollars to Woody's, or another wheel shop.

If you've got the money, they've got the time . . . assuming alternate size wheels/tires are that important to you.

Or, if within your capabilities, lace up some hubs to rims of your choosing.

As to another opinion on the necessary precision regarding inner tube size, this ain't a poll. Only you can make the decision; someone may give you bum dope, just funnin' you! I'd bet your friendly local CycleGear franchise stocks suitable inner tubes in appropriate sizes for the tires you want to order, but . . . that's just ME!
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post #5 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 09:34 AM
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A 130mm is a 5.10" tire. The aspect ratio doesn't mean anything in a tube. That tube is good to go.

Find wheels on e-bay. Budget $250 ea for decent wheels and new bearings, cush drive, and rotors. Any wheel from '87 to the present will work, the only difference between Gen 1 and Gen 2 is the rotors, which you should replace anyway. Bearings may not need to be replaced, but consider it and budget for it. Buy proper bearing tools (should fit in the $500 budget. MotionPro makes good stuff for home use at a reasonable price.).

https://www.souperdoo.com/stuff%20th...ng-replacement
https://www.souperdoo.com/stuff%20th...oupling-damper

Tom [email protected]

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Last edited by Tom Schmitz; 10-23-2018 at 09:36 AM.
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 09:38 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the input! You all are an incredible resource!
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post

Find wheels on e-bay. Budget $250 ea for decent wheels and new bearings, cush drive, and rotors.
Sound advice for the thread-starter's, darkipod's, first question:

"On another note, if I wanted to buy new wheels how would I go about doing that?"

The figure, $ 250 per wheel, seems reasonable for used OEM wheels (I even have a couple I'd let go for that!).

Further, darkipod discloses:

"I'm interested in trying out other sizes that may have more tire options in the future."

If "other sizes," means rim diameters other than stock, I think the alternate wheels, will cost much more (or require considerable rim-lacing sweat equity), based upon the cost of the custom wheels (from, 21"/18" to 19"/17") a previous owner installed on my KTM690.

Yet, I may just be unaware of affordable and available alternative wheel sizes, such as "Supermoto" wheels, for KLR650s.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 12:50 PM
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I've always looked askance at the whole idea of changing wheel sizes as it seems to be an answer in search of a problem.

But then, I am the king of finding answers for which there is no real problem, no? Pot, meet kettle.

I do keep an extra set of wheels around with knobbies on them just so I don't have to spoon so much.

If the OP really wants to try different rim sizes I think the best approach there is to learn to build wheels. It's not all that hard. I used to build bicycle wheels for a living and think that those are harder than motorcycle wheels. Bicycle rims are like wet noodles compared to motorcycle rims. By learning to build wheels he could try a size, sell the bits and pieces and try another size.
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Tom [email protected]

I lit a cigarette and dragged a smoking stand beside the chair. The minutes went by on tiptoe, with their fingers to their lips. -Philip Marlowe

'Why' and 'How' are words so important they cannot be too often used. -Napoleon Bonaparte


Sting like a butterfly.
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-23-2018, 06:01 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
I've always looked askance at the whole idea of changing wheel sizes as it seems to be an answer in search of a problem.

But then, I am the king of finding answers for which there is no real problem, no? Pot, meet kettle.

I do keep an extra set of wheels around with knobbies on them just so I don't have to spoon so much.

If the OP really wants to try different rim sizes I think the best approach there is to learn to build wheels. It's not all that hard. I used to build bicycle wheels for a living and think that those are harder than motorcycle wheels. Bicycle rims are like wet noodles compared to motorcycle rims. By learning to build wheels he could try a size, sell the bits and pieces and try another size.
Building my own wheels does sound interesting, I was wondering if I might try supermoto wheels in the future or more standard drirt bike tires.
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