2008 klr 650 basic electrical accessories mod - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 05:21 PM Thread Starter
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2008 klr 650 basic electrical accessories mod

2008 KLR 650 – BASIC ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES MOD

PROVIDING MULTIPLE 12 VOLT ELECTRICAL ACCESSORY POWER SOURCE NEEDS INCLUDING HEATED GEAR, GPS AND PHONE CHARGING, LED RUNNING LIGHTS AND BATTERY MONITORING

Applies to 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 model year KLR-650 s

The objective of these wiring system mods was to create power sources for the following items:

1) Heated jacket liner and gloves
2) A battery charger access point
3) A GPS
4) A phone charger
5) Two 10 watt LED running lights
6) A battery voltage meter /monitor


In order to extend my riding season up here in the frozen north, I wanted to be able to run heated gear. I also wanted to run a GPS, phone charger, and some highly visible to cars – LED running lights. All of this takes power, and the KLR does not have a lot of extra power. So, before doing this mod to setup power for all of these things, I first did a total LED conversion mod on my bike. I spent time and money on parts to replace all of the standard incandescent bulbs (except the headlights) on my 2009 model KLR-650 - with low power LEDS. This saves me from 20 to 40 watts on average when riding in traffic. There's a link to this mod here:
http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.p...4996#post74996

The battery monitor by Argus is called the Battery Bug – it's used for monitoring battery voltage and health when running heavy loads like heated gear (jacket 75 watts max, gloves 28 watts max) , and the extra 20 watts of running light LEDs
http://www.argusanalyzers.com/index.php?id=44

Each of these above power needs were looked at from where the power needed to be provided physically on the bike, what could serve dual or triple connection point needs (like the battery tender slash tank bag connector), what needed to be fused separately and what would be the easiest way to accomplish this all with what I already had on hand. Three individual circuits were decided on.











More images: this mod's annotated sequence of the install of these circuits is provided here:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/6054519...7626358626944/


Circuit 1Dual purpose single connection – for the battery charger and tank bag power
NOTE watch polarity.

This circuit has its own inline fuse coming off the battery and provides power into the battery from the battery charger, when parked at home sitting. Then provides 12 volt power out of the battery to the tank bag, when riding.

The 12 volt connection point from the tank bag, that hooks to the same connection as the battery tender, is wired to a double "side by side" automotive style 12 volt receptacle unit, inside the tank bag (aka cigarette lighter or car dash board 12v sockets). These 2 12v tank bag sockets provide the utility of being able to plug whatever you want to into them that you could plug into a car. For example, my TomTom GPS has a 12volt car charger plug that works in one of these sockets. My cell phone does too. You can also access a USB 5 volt charging power from the 12v sockets, by inserting a USB 12v car socket style adapter, into one of the sockets too. It seems like a good generic use setup for power needs inside the tank bag.


Circuit 2 Heated gear power circuit
This circuit hardware came from Gerbing as is, and all I did was hooked it up to each terminal on the battery. It simply provides fused power to the Gerbing heat controller, which then plugs into the Gerbing Heated Jacket – and the jacket itself provided power to the Gerbing gloves via sleeve end connectors. The heat controller lets you turn up or turn down the 12 volt current delivery duration time to the gear, so it works kind like a rheostat or dimmer. So if you see the battery monitor voltage going below a sustainable level, you can turn the Gerbing controller down for your gloves, or your jacket liner to reduce the wattage draw of the heated gear. When you turn it down it just slows down the duration of the 12 volt "power on" pulses that are being applied to the gear, thereby saving power by cutting your "gear power on time" down.

http://gerbing.com/Products/tempControls.html
http://gerbing.com/Products/Liners/h...cketLiner.html
http://gerbing.com/Products/Gloves/G3.html

I've had a chance to do some riding with the heated gear on over the last few weeks, and wow – is it ever a great way to get out there when it's cold! It makes a huge difference. I'm very happy I got the gear.


Circuit 3Auxiliary LED running lights, and battery monitor circuit
This circuit simply takes a 10 foot wire off each terminal on the battery(one for positive and one for negative) and runs the 12v power providing wires into a plastic split flex tubing protector - out along the bottom of the tank, up to and behind, the dash area of the bike, and then back down the other side to the two auxiliary lights. So there's 3 soldered in "take off points" that give 12volt power, using quick connect / disconnect connectors to allow for 12 volt power at 3 points that need it along the path. The 3 power provisions provide power to the battery bug, and the 2 auxiliary LED running lights.

Lights are from this link:
http://stores.intuitwebsites.com/hst...StoreFront.bok
Battery Bug by Argus here:
http://www.argusanalyzers.com/index.php?id=44



-------------------------------------------
Final installation results:
-------------------------------------------









-------------------------------------------
Additional Notes:
-------------------------------------------

I did not use a power on relay system here, instead I just made sure all circuits had a fuse, and then gave the things I wanted to turn off at will, an on off switch on the dash. I will install a "power on relay" this summer when time allows, but I will still be happy to have the power cutoff switch too for the new running lights.

I did not run a wire from the battery under the tank and onto the handlebars for the GPS. I decided to wait until this summer to do that one. In the mean time I believe a coiled spring style wire connector cable from the tank bag to the GPS will be safe enough for me, as long as it has plenty of give and spring back.

One thing I need to learn about and could use help with too, is when to know (at what voltages) when the charging system is not keeping up with the needs of the battery ongoing battery charge state, to insure that the battery will be topped off and not drained, when I stop riding. With this much potential load on the electrical system, the battery monitoring is mighty important I believe.

I know there's a lot of ways to improve things, and any feedback I can get from this great group on ways to improve this setup would be very welcome indeed!

AM
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Last edited by Adventure-Moto; 03-26-2011 at 07:11 PM.
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post #2 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 06:31 PM
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A-M -

Another nice write-up! Good work there.

I theen I gonna put eet on da "Common Mods and Issues"...

T

Tom [email protected]

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post #3 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 06:40 PM Thread Starter
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Excellante Amigo! Thanks Tom!! Wish it woulda already been there before I got started. That woulda saved me a lot of time. HaHa!

"No good deed goes unpunished"

Last edited by Adventure-Moto; 03-26-2011 at 07:43 PM.
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post #4 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Road tested the heated gear and LED lights today

I did about an hour out on the highway today in the rain and cold, to test the heated gear and new LED lights out. Everything functioned well. I was able to adjust my heat on my gloves and jacket liner easily with the "dual heat controller" from Gerbing, on my lower left jacket pocket. The voltage meter kept showing anywhere form 12.9 volts to 14.3 volts on my system depending on how high I cranked the heat up on my gloves and jacket liner. That was traveling at speeds of around 60 to 75, and with both 10 watt LED lights lit, and the heated jacket liner on about half way (about 50 watts) and the gloves on about halfway (about 15 watts). So running on the highway with 20 watts in LEDs and 65 watts in heated gear, the bike did fine with no low voltage readings from the battery bug. All in all - so far so good. It looks like the setup will run fine for longer distance cold weather rides.

"No good deed goes unpunished"

Last edited by Adventure-Moto; 03-26-2011 at 10:41 PM.
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post #5 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 11:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adventure-Moto View Post
I did about an hour out on the highway today in the rain and cold, to test the heated gear and new LED lights out. Everything functioned well. I was able to adjust my heat on my gloves and jacket liner easily with the "dual heat controller" from Gerbing, on my lower left jacket pocket. The voltage meter kept showing anywhere form 12.9 volts to 14.3 volts on my system depending on how high I cranked the heat up on my gloves and jacket liner. That was traveling at speeds of around 60 to 75, and with both 10 watt LED lights lit, and the heated jacket liner on about half way (about 50 watts) and the gloves on about halfway (about 15 watts). So running on the highway with 20 watts in LEDs and 65 watts in heated gear, the bike did fine with no low voltage readings from the battery bug. All in all - so far so good. It looks like the setup will run fine for longer distance cold weather rides.

uh... wait till you turn on the high beam

No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has conceived what God has prepared for those who love him. 1 Cor 2:9
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post #6 of 17 Old 03-26-2011, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks, good point Spec. That's one of the reasons I wanted the cutout switch for the 20 watts worth of LEDs. It will help - and I can turn down the heated gear as needed, to off if need be.

Does anyone know what the voltage charging system range needs to be maintained at, to keep the battery happy and in the green, while riding and drawing a current from several loads? That's something I need to research some more.

AM

"No good deed goes unpunished"
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post #7 of 17 Old 03-27-2011, 09:22 AM Thread Starter
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Monitoring battery voltage to know if the battery is getting charged or discharged.

Motorcycle battery voltage monitoring is important to me, in order to know if the battery is getting charged or discharged while riding. I'm using an Argus Battery Bug to watch my battery charge state while riding. I did some reading online today to see what the voltage ranges mean to a few of the makers of the batteries, and a few of the devices that are designed to monitor motorcycle batteries.

I checked my VRLA battery makers specs first. Then looked at the devices that are sold to alert us when there's a problem. To me it looks generally like anything above 13.0 volts while riding is good and the battery will be getting charged, not discharged.

Any comments or help with this analysis are welcome.

-----------------------------------------------
My KLR-650 battery, is a ETX15L DEKA PowerSport Battery which I bought here.
http://www.tristatebattery.com/produ...roducts_id=977

Here are some manufacturer specs on the battery which can be found here:
http://www.federalbatteries.com.au/f...ATION_BOOK.pdf


Resting post charge values that show the state of the battery. So after riding, if I wait a day, and then look at my OCV before riding or starting the bike, I can use these guidelines below to know the state of my battery.

* OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGE * after charging - (NOT WHILE RIDING)
AS IT RELATES TO STATE OF CHARGE.
Quoted from site

"Open Circuit Voltage* State of Charge
12.70 or greater . . . . . . . 100%
12.60 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75%
12.30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50%
12.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25%
11.80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0%
* The actual stabilized OCV can only be determined after the
battery has been removed from the charger for 24 hours."

End quote
------------------------------------------------

Signal Dynamics Heads-Up LED Voltage Monitor

http://signaldynamics.com/index.php?...hk=1&Itemid=77

Quoted from site:

"flashing green: above 15.2v (over-voltage is bad)
steady green: 12.9 – 15.1v
steady amber: 12.7 – 12.8v
steady red: 12.1 – 12.6v
flashing red: below 12v"

End quotes
------------------------------------------------

Electrical Connection LED Motorcycle Battery Voltage Monitor

http://www.twistedthrottle.com/trade...view/2864/653/
Quoted from site

"GREEN - 12.0 volts and up
AMBER - 11.9 to 11.5 volts
RED - < 11.5 volts"

End quote
-----------------------------------------------

Kuryakyn's LED Battery Gauge

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com...ITEM/Kuryakyn-

Quoted from site

"LED-Battery-Gauge.aspx
Green LED - normal - 12.5 to 14.5V
Amber LED warns the bike is not charging
If reading drops below 10V or exceeds 15V, flashing red LED alerts the rider"

End quote

-----------------------------------------------

"Yuasa's own specs for a VRLA"

Quoted text found from this source from this link:
http://www.triumphrat.net/twins-tech...e-monitor.html

Start Quote:
"A quick guide to battery volts using Yuasa's own specs for a VRLA (Valve regulated lead acid) battery as fitted to the Bonnies:

State of charge------Voltage

100%----------------12.8-13.0
75-100%-------------12.5-12.8
50-75%--------------12.0-12.5
25-50%--------------11.5-12.0
0-25%---------------11.5 or less"

End Quote
-----------------------------------------------

AM

"No good deed goes unpunished"

Last edited by Adventure-Moto; 03-27-2011 at 10:21 AM.
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post #8 of 17 Old 03-28-2011, 04:57 PM
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Great write up. Well done!!
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post #9 of 17 Old 04-01-2011, 05:38 PM
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Great write-up A-M, thank you for the info!
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post #10 of 17 Old 04-02-2011, 09:41 PM
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I really like this setup. Thanks for the details.
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