Oil plug repair - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-12-2012, 02:43 PM Thread Starter
Neutral
 
tantheman4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: NEBRASKA
Posts: 14
Oil plug repair

Just three weeks ago, i bought my klr. I'm 19 years old and this is my first street bike ever. The other night I was attempting my first oil change and read in the manual that you can only put 17 pounds of torque on that oil plug... and seeing as i didnt have a torque wrench that went that low, i tried it anyway with a regular ratchet. And needless to say there are no more threads in that oil plug......

So is a helicoil an effective fix for an oil plug? My dad says its not really a long term fix especially for something you have to pull out as often as an oil plug.. but everybody else seems to think helicoil is the only solution.... any help would be great guys
tantheman4 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 07-12-2012, 02:52 PM
Threadjacker
 
Lockjaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Benicia, CA
Posts: 6,750
I stripped mine the first time I changed the oil. Tapped it out and it was all good. I wouldn't use a helicoil personally. Tapping it out was pretty easy. Go slow, lots of grease to catch the shavings. Pour a qt or two of warm oil through to get any loose metal. Good to go.




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

PPMC #1.
Soon, we ride.

AKA JD Mader or you can call me "Dan" just not early for dinner.

Click my handle for a link to my homepage/blog...which has nothing to do with MCs. Free literature and music! Viva La Revolucion!
-------------------
2008 KLR 650
RIP DM - Soon, we ride.
Lockjaw is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 02:54 PM
Threadjacker
 
Lockjaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Benicia, CA
Posts: 6,750
And remember, it is not a load bearing bolt. I snug mine by hand and wrap it in teflon plumbers tape. I don't ever use a torque wrench. Snug works. My .02. 17K miles and never a drip.




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

PPMC #1.
Soon, we ride.

AKA JD Mader or you can call me "Dan" just not early for dinner.

Click my handle for a link to my homepage/blog...which has nothing to do with MCs. Free literature and music! Viva La Revolucion!
-------------------
2008 KLR 650
RIP DM - Soon, we ride.
Lockjaw is offline  
 
Old 07-12-2012, 03:13 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 763
An OVERSIZE OIL DRAIN PLUG, a taptered, self-tapping plug of the same pitch, but slightly larger diameter than the original plug, offers the possibility for a permanent and inexpensive solution to your problem.

Ideally, M12 X 1.5 oversize, but another pitch may work (as some have reported).

Costs less than $ 5; if it DOESN'T work, you're no worse off than when you started (less a dollars for the plug).

The slight additional diameter provides purchase for the threads, with enough fastening force to seal the hole with the typical washer.

http://www.cgenterprises.com/drain_p...ize_repair.htm

Now, I await contrary posts, from forum members who run, screaming, from the room, at the mere thought of an oversize oil drain plug!

As mentioned above, the oil drain plug is NOT a fastener of high mechanical stress; its only function is sealing the crankcase at atmospheric pressure. My motto: "If it seals, it heals!" I've had miracle cures with oversize oil drain plugs; you might enjoy the same--inexpensive, permanent, durable fixes.

For those who claim oversize oil drain plugs do not work, please explain why oversize oil drain plug factories are working multiple shifts, producing these products!

Last edited by LoneRider; 07-12-2012 at 03:19 PM.
LoneRider is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 03:47 PM
2nd Gear
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 224
HI

Good question with two answers as far as I see it myself. At 19 years old I would have no doubt put an overiszed plug in it and moved on. If it leaked again I would have put a double oversize in it and sold the bike to the next guy. With age comes wisdom however. Now myself as a mechanic I think using an oversize drain plug is kind of like kissing your sister. It might be alright for some but its bound to get messy at some point. I have a repair going on my cracked case right now. I pulled the motor and as we speak it is at machinist being repaired. When done I expect it will be better than new. If your case is not broken I think taking it to someone that can tap some new threads and then go back with a bigger plug is the best option. DONT FORGET......as others have said its just a plug that seals, big torque is not needed. Good luck and make some memories on that ride......
moriver is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 04:21 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 763
Quote:
Originally Posted by moriver View Post
If your case is not broken I think taking it to someone that can tap some new threads and then go back with a bigger plug is the best option.
AFAIK, the case ain't cracked; he just stripped the threads of the oil drain hole. You describe the exact procedure of initially installing an oversize oil drain plug, moriver; i.e., tapping new threads, and installing a bigger (larger diameter) plug.

Worth a try in my book, and--if it doesn't work, so what? He's no worse off, and can try something else (e.g., drilling-and-tapping to a larger size (like 1/2"), installing an insert, welding/drilling/tapping, etc.).

An oversize oil drain plug is low-cost, low-effort, short time and low-risk. I'd chance it!
LoneRider is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 05:11 PM
3rd Gear
 
steferf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Rolla, Mo
Posts: 576
Check this out....

http://www.klr650.marknet.us/timesert.html

Uses a neat trick of using grease to keep the metal chips out of the oil supply. This might be what your lookin for.

I donno how well it works fwiw.

2006 Red KLR 650

Modifications:
1)Doohickey Planned and purchased 2)Aftermarket Grips 3)Grip Heaters 4)Happy Trails Hard Luggage Rack 5)20 mm ammo cases planned soon 6)Aftermarket Exhaust 7)Thermobob 8)Happy Trails Fork Brace 9)Stainless Steel Oil Filter 10)Magnetic Drain Plug

See profile visitors post for details and planned mods.
steferf is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 07:48 PM
2nd Gear
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Prescott, AZ
Posts: 290
I've been machining for 35+ years and I agree with LoneRider.
CraigES is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 08:01 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 763
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigES View Post
I've been machining for 35+ years and I agree with LoneRider.
Thanks, CraigES; at least, the opposition is not 100 % unanimous!

Imagining a production line in Thailand (or wherever these engine are manufactured), I think of a hole bored in the crankcase for the oil drain plug.

Then, the hole is tapped for the oil drain plug threads.

I personally cannot detect any fundamental operational difference between this initial manufacturing process, and threading an oversize oil drain plug into a stripped hole.

If the re-worked hole and replacement plug hold and seal the sump, where's the sting, I ask?

Yet, to each his own. Some insist benefiting from an oversize oil drain plug, repairing a stripped hole, is living in sin. I'm sure they have their reasons.
LoneRider is offline  
Old 07-12-2012, 08:14 PM
2nd Gear
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 224
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoneRider View Post
AFAIK, the case ain't cracked; he just stripped the threads of the oil drain hole. You describe the exact procedure of initially installing an oversize oil drain plug, moriver; i.e., tapping new threads, and installing a bigger (larger diameter) plug.

Worth a try in my book, and--if it doesn't work, so what? He's no worse off, and can try something else (e.g., drilling-and-tapping to a larger size (like 1/2"), installing an insert, welding/drilling/tapping, etc.).

An oversize oil drain plug is low-cost, low-effort, short time and low-risk. I'd chance it!
You are correct Lonerider, that is the exact procedure I discribed. And as long as the initial diagnosis is correct I would go with an oversized myself, that is correct, oversized.....
moriver is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
 

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Thread Tools



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Doohickey repair 449wireman 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 15 06-19-2013 06:04 AM
Scuff & scratch repair. MongoNv 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 3 08-21-2010 02:30 PM
boy do i need tire repair practice ! wayne_l 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 2 07-22-2010 05:39 PM
Strippped thread repair BIGIRON 1987 to 2007 Wrenching & Mods 0 04-05-2008 09:24 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome