MPC springs? - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #1 of 12 Old 12-15-2014, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
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MPC springs?

I've just bought a new 2014 KLR650 in Cape Town. I am planning to ride the bike from there back to the UK on a mix of paved and dirt roads. I am about 95kgs and will have luggage in addition (quite a bit since camping and spending 3 months on the road.

The dealer has proposed fitting MPC progressive springs to the forks and a stiffer MPC spring to the rear shock. I can't find this brand on the net. I'm being quoted:

MPC Progressive Fork Springs - R1350.00 ($115)
MPC Progressive Rear Shock Spring - R1550.00 ($132)

Anyone heard of MPC?
Is this a sensible approach?
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post #2 of 12 Old 12-16-2014, 10:46 AM
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Temporaryescapee,
You might go to the 'Africa' section of this forum, 'click' on "Dualthing"s name.
And send him a personal message, asking if he or his KLR mechanic are familiar with that brand of suspension springs in South Africa.

Being as most of us are in N. America, I/we are not familiar with that brand.

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting
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post #3 of 12 Old 12-20-2014, 03:47 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the pointer - I will do that.

Cheers
Andy
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post #4 of 12 Old 12-29-2014, 12:57 AM
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I can tell you my personal experience. I have a 2008 KLR 650. I weigh about 111 Kg and carry about 43 Kg in saddle bags and a large tail box. I like to ride multiple transcontinental dirt road routes in the US and Canada.

With the stock suspension I rode about 160,000 Km before finally having to replace the rear shock in 2013. I have been very happy with the ride and durability of the stock KLR. The deep washboards on some of the forest roads on the Trans-Canada Adventure Trail did manage to loosen a few bolts, so I carry some blue Loctite.

Enjoy your KLR and your ride.
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post #5 of 12 Old 02-06-2016, 12:34 AM Thread Starter
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MPC springs?

Old thread now and i know most folks are US based but in case anyone else is ever looking at these there is more info here:

http://www.mpcustomvalve.co.za/products.asp?cat=62
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post #6 of 12 Old 02-06-2016, 05:40 AM
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I referred you to, "Wotnext," a South African KLR650 rider who's ridden both in Africa and in the Americas (45,000 miles in the latter venue), who modified his bike extensively for the camping equipment load.

He might respond to your Adventure Rider "conversation," or, if not . . . perhaps I can develop his e-mail address for you; PM me if you want to exploit that possibility.

The stronger springs you suggest (Progressive front and whatever alphabet soup rear suggested) sound like an improvement for your own weight and extra gear you propose carrying; however . . . the finesse of, for example, a Cogent Suspensions Moab rear shock, stiffer front springs and cartridge dampers remains wanting with such modifications only. The DAMPING/REBOUND of the stronger springs you propose does not keep pace with their greater spring rate.

Big deal? Maybe not. A lot depends upon your riding style and environment.

That said, I think your South African dealer offers sound (and economical) suspension upgrade for your mission; perhaps adequate in front-and-rear spring rate, but damping/rebound? Not so much.

Best wishes, whatever you decide, and . . . if your new KLR650 is a 2014-1/2 (or later) New Edition (with stronger suspension than previous models factory stock, and wider saddle), you can probably complete your journey with the bike as-built, stock, "out-of-the-box." I think Peter ("Wotnext," Riding Through the Americas, http://advrider.com/index.php?thread...ericas.970477/ ) could have completed his odyssey with a stock bike, also.

Last edited by Damocles; 02-06-2016 at 05:53 AM.
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post #7 of 12 Old 02-06-2016, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Damocles - I actually had these springs fitted before the bike was delivered. but never got to the bottom of who MPC were. I came across them recently on a South African forum so thought I'd share on the off chance that someone else is asking the same question in future.



Having not ridden the KLR I won't have anything to directly compare to, but I will report back on how they fare. I am planning a pretty steady ride so if it just tweaks things a bit to broadly allow for my weight and luggage that'll do me. (Not sure if they have the NE in South Africa - they definitely didn't when I was ordering).
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post #8 of 12 Old 02-07-2016, 09:04 AM
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Just some general comments on your odyssey:

Be confident you know how to check the oil level (bike upright, leave time for oil to drain into sump before measuring), how to change the oil and filter (do NOT throw away the oil tube with the old filter), how to clean and oil the engine air filter.

Understand what correct chain slack is, and how to adjust it. Likewise, know how to adjust balancer chain tension (approaching the dreaded and feared doohickey).

Keep an eye on coolant levels in the radiator and reservoir.

A stock battery's serviceable enough, but may require some maintenance. A sealed replacement battery requires no maintenance (no checking/filling electrolyte chambers), and won't spill acid about when the bike falls down.

Develop some knowledge and competence in de-mounting, repairing, and re-mounting tires. Videos are available, and the chaps at the shop might offer tutorials if you need 'em.

I'd recommend carrying a WIRING DIAGRAM (available on-line) and a small digital multimeter; spare headlight and taillight bulbs; plenty of spare fuses, electrical tape, baling wire and zip ties; a pocketful of typical nuts and bolts.

You might look at a video or two showing how to pick up, properly, a downed motorcycle (just in case!).

Then again, you may not listen to or follow any of this advice and do just fine; I hope so!
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post #9 of 12 Old 02-07-2016, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damocles View Post
..................
You might look at a video or two showing how to pick up, properly, a downed motorcycle (just in case!)................
A caution on those videos about picking up a motorcycle on its side. Many of those videos show a small woman easily picking a motorcycle. It seems to me that all of those videos use a bike with cylinders out the side (BMW) and crash bars over the cylinders. Bikes like that don't really fall down. They just lean over on the cylinder/crash bar and only go over about half way.

IT IS THE FIRST HALF THAT IS HARD not the second half.
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post #10 of 12 Old 02-07-2016, 09:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoMotor View Post
A caution on those videos about picking up a motorcycle on its side. Many of those videos show a small woman easily picking a motorcycle. It seems to me that all of those videos use a bike with cylinders out the side (BMW) and crash bars over the cylinders. Bikes like that don't really fall down. They just lean over on the cylinder/crash bar and only go over about half way.

IT IS THE FIRST HALF THAT IS HARD not the second half.
Us guys with bad backs say amen to that.

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