which carb bits? - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

 2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 24 Old 02-01-2016, 06:04 PM Thread Starter
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 61
which carb bits?

Can anyone help me decide what carb parts to take with me on my Cape Town to Cairo trip this summer?

I am going to be riding at sea level to 3,000 metres. Having read a number of threads I have decided just to leave things stock (partly because that seems to have worked out ok for others doing this and partly because I don't have the wrenching skills!).

However I want to take a carb kit with me just in case. I am probably going to have to use fuel out of a bucket at the side of the road at times so may need to clean out the carb. Also I'd like to have a plan b if the altitude does become a problem (so I can find a local mechanic to help me if needed).

I am therefore thinking I will take a carb service kit (I am also adding an in-line filter) and a smaller main jet. My question is what jet size should I take? The standard one on my bike is a 145 I believe.

Appreciate any guidance you can give (you guys have been great in getting me up to speed on the KLR- thanks).

Cheers
Andy
Temporaryescapee is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 24 Old 02-01-2016, 07:18 PM
5th Gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,333
Unless your world-wide itinerary includes Mt. Everest, I'd suggest you forget about altitude-tuning. An excursion of 3000 feet will be accommodated adequately by the KLR650's CV (constant velocity/constant vacuum) design. At higher altitudes, the less-dense air produces less vacuum at velocity, drawing the slide and needle less upwards, thus "fuel-leaning" the air/fuel mixture.

No way loss of power can be avoided at altitude; the CV carb helps provide a more-or-less optimum air/fuel ratio.

Emergency carb repair/rebuild kit? Most carb problems can be solved by cleaning/adjustment; the parts aren't particularly sensitive to wear. Maybe a float valve needle, some gaskets; slide-and-diaphragm if you really want to safe-side things.

Otherwise . . . I'd suggest you swap out the external carburetor cross-head machine screws for Allen-head (hex socket) machine screws; bring the correct-sized Allen key in your tool kit and you'll be able to take the carb apart when it needs attention. Galvanic corrosion tends to stick the stock steel screws in the alloy carb body, making screw removal with conventional screwdrivers (even JIS bits) a challenge.
Damocles is offline  
post #3 of 24 Old 02-01-2016, 09:30 PM
5th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Lac La Biche Alberta Canada
Posts: 3,205
Temporaryescapee,
3000m (or roughly 9842.5 feet Damoclese!) will still be ok to travel through with the KLR stock jetting. The KLR is jetted pretty lean to meet emissions and the CKV carb has a somewhat altitude compensating function due to the vacuum operation of the slide and needle assembly. I would rejet if I lived in those altitudes but not just to travel through. I have ridden my 2011 at that and higher altitudes in the Canadian Rockies. Sure there was some power loss but not enough to make it worthwhile to rejet for the short time while traveling.
I think Damoclese's parts recommendation is spot on with emphasis on the slide and diaphragm. It is the most likely to fail but even that is unlikely. People ride these bikes for years without needing one. They most often fail when someone takes the carb apart and installs the diaphragm incorrectly on assembly. Leave it alone and it will last for thousands of miles.
Regards....General JustJeff

It's not a Tractor....It's a LOCOMOTIVE!! Chugga Chugga
Woooo WOOOOO!!!!!
justjeff is offline  
 
post #4 of 24 Old 02-02-2016, 12:20 AM Thread Starter
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 61
which carb bits?

Thank you!

I'll swap out those screws as suggested. Is this what i need?

http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...d=360324259782

Last edited by Temporaryescapee; 02-02-2016 at 12:43 AM.
Temporaryescapee is offline  
post #5 of 24 Old 02-02-2016, 08:41 AM
5th Gear
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 4,333
That's a good start, Temporaryescape! A few more external machine screws are employed on the carb, but those four are the most critical.

O.K., justjeff, METERS! Since the OP is from the UK, I suppose I must have thought he'd use the BRITISH system of measurement.
Damocles is offline  
post #6 of 24 Old 02-02-2016, 01:26 PM
5th Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Lac La Biche Alberta Canada
Posts: 3,205
[QUOTE=Damocles;
O.K., justjeff, METERS! Since the OP is from the UK, I suppose I must have thought he'd use the BRITISH system of measurement.[/QUOTE]

I know! Those darn Frenchmen and their daft metric system! Why can't we all use stones and rods and hogsheads and cubits and leagues and pecks and pennyweights and....
Regards....General JustJeff

It's not a Tractor....It's a LOCOMOTIVE!! Chugga Chugga
Woooo WOOOOO!!!!!
justjeff is offline  
post #7 of 24 Old 02-02-2016, 01:59 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,250
The carburetor on a KLR is one of the last things you will need to worry about. No jet changing should be required. I live at sea level and ride up to 13,000 feet (4,000 meters) with no changes. As mentioned the carburetor on the KLR self adjusts for altitude.

I take 10 to 20 thousand mile (16,000 to 32,00km) trips and never take carburetor parts. I have 100,000 miles (160,000km) on one KLR and only had to open the carburetor one time to clean the jets because I let it sit three months with gas in the carburetor. All that was needed was a Phillips and a flat screwdriver. The rubber gasket can be reused.

For suggestions on other items to take, let us know the round trip distance and the year model and mileage on you KLR.

Last edited by GoMotor; 02-02-2016 at 02:03 PM.
GoMotor is offline  
post #8 of 24 Old 02-03-2016, 12:37 AM Thread Starter
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 61
which carb bits?

Thanks.

my bike is a 2014 with 500kms or so on it. My best guess on distance is another 17,000kms. details of the route and bike are here: https://temporaryescapee.wordpress.com/

Sorry about the French spelling - I have tried to use my best american here but slipped on that one ;-) It gets really confusing when we get into gallons beause our pints have 568mls in them.....

Cheers
Andy

Last edited by Temporaryescapee; 02-03-2016 at 10:43 AM.
Temporaryescapee is offline  
post #9 of 24 Old 02-03-2016, 08:11 AM
2nd Gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 387
Take a pre-oiled air filter in a baggie. That way you can change filters as needed and clean the spare at your convenience.
twinjet is offline  
post #10 of 24 Old 02-03-2016, 12:36 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,250
Andy, your spelling seems better than mine. I see no need to take anything for your carburetor. Nothing in the carburetor wears out or breaks in less then 80,000km or more. Any dirt that gets past your four filters can be cleaned out and the rubber gasket is reusable many ties.

If you install and extra fuel filter, there will be four filters because there two on the petcock in the tank, one for "RUN" and one for "RESERVE". Also there is one in the inlet to the carburetor where the fuel tube connects to the carburetor. Part number 49019 here 2014 Kawasaki KLR650 (KL650EEF) Carburetor(1/3)(US,CN) | CyclePartsNation Kawasaki Parts Nation.
If you decide to use the extra filter, use a sintered metal one rather than a paper one. Also make sure you have a piece of tube to replace it with in case the extra filter causes problems for you. Some times they do.

Some riders carry an extra foam air filter and special cleaner and special oil for the filter. I don't want to give up the space for those things. I just clean the filter with gasoline, squeeze it out, oil it with engine oil and ride on in 30 minutes.

You should plan for a new set of tires along the way. Know where you can get tires that fit or ship them ahead. Carrying tires reduces the pleasure of the trip. Your chain should be good for at lease 20,000 km. I take spare clutch and front brake levers.

You could change oil every 4,500 km or so and take one spare oil filter to change at the second oil change.

Last edited by GoMotor; 02-03-2016 at 01:00 PM.
GoMotor is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Metal Cutting Router Bits planalp The Off Topic Lounge 13 01-28-2017 09:52 PM
2008 with bits desertraider Show Off Your Bike 0 01-22-2012 12:51 PM
Two Bits Rally NoBull Western Riders 0 05-02-2010 09:29 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome