My mini compressor let me down today. Not sure if I damaged my inner tube. - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #1 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 01:34 AM Thread Starter
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My mini compressor let me down today. Not sure if I damaged my inner tube.

So I took my KLR on an adventure today deep up onto the ridge. Took a break for a while to appreciate the total Silence of the wilderness and when I returned to my bike I noticed the front tire was a little soft. Knowing that I had a treacherous Gravel Road descent back to civilization I decided to top off the tire with my little pump. I put the pump on the tire pumped for about 2 seconds and the pump snapped in half and released all the air from my tire before I could unscrew the little bastard from my valve stem. After about an hour of trying to use sticks and zip ties to get the pump to work unsuccessfully I decided to just slowly descend with about two pounds of air in the tire after about a mile of white-knuckle hell I came across a farmer by the road and asked him if he could pump up my tire. The nice gentleman did so and I went on my way home. 2 questions what's the best portable pump a man can purchase? And or the most Dependable tire inflation method such as CO2 or whatever. And the next question is my tire seems fine still holding air should I be worried about the tube failing after such punishment?

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post #2 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 03:51 AM
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. . . what's the best portable pump a man can purchase?
Well . . . first, perhaps we should DEFINE OUR TERMS!

As in, what does, "BEST," mean? Most reliable? Most durable? Greatest cfm (cubic feet per minute)? Highest psi (pounds per square inch)? Most compact? Lightest weight? Etc.?

Looking at, "reliable, durable," maybe . . . a MANUALLY-ACTUATED pump, such as one you might find at a trendy BICYCLE STORE. Or, outdoor store, like . . . REI, etc. Walk right in, sit right down, and ask the dedicated sales staff for what you want, and . . . chances are, the very product you need is available in stock.

Now, if you want an ELECTRIC COMPRESSOR . . . the big boys on the playground say, the "CADILLAC" of this category is a http://www.bestrestproducts.com CYCLE PUMP (e.g., the "EXPEDITION"); lifetime warranty, made in the USA.

Leaning further toward KLRista frugalism, a SLIME pump, preferably a notch or two up from their small, very economical, "TOP-OFF" compressor, might do the job. Got one; stellar performance; bit of a weight and size penalty compared to alternatives, but compensating in performance, durability/reliability, all that stuff.

As to the $ 5 Harbor Freight-type overseas-manufacture mini-compressors (not unlike the one that grenaded on you); these often qualify as . . . JUNK, in terms of their material and workmanship, as illustrated in your example. One doesn't ALWAYS, "get what you pay for," but . . . sometimes, the axiom is fulfilled.

CO2? Hey; those systems really WORK WELL, but . . . how many CO2 cartridges must you CARRY? Example; you have a flat; you patch the tire; you inflate it with CO2, but . . . DUMMY, you pinched the tube on installation! Or, the patch doesn't hold! You think you fix it, expend your spare/reserve CO2 cartridges, and . . . it goes flat AGAIN! Where, in the middle of the forsaken Limberlost Swamp or the Dismal Swamp or the Gobi Desert are you going to find additional CO2 cartridges?

So, . . . you pays yer money and you takes yer cherce . . . good luck!

One question: Is airing UP a tire for gravel recommended? Just askin'!

=======================

As to, what to do about the run-flat tube you harbor . . . the prudent motorcyclist would demount the tire and inspect the tube. Most, however, would run it as is, keeping an eye on its pressure over forthcoming mileage. For SAFETY, I think the "book solution" would be to inspect the tube. Truth be told, I'm not sure what I would do in your position; might depend upon the service life spectrum I intend (i.e., just tooling around the 'hood, or launching a round-the-world excursion; a flawed consideration, perhaps, since a blowout even in one's neighborhood could have disastrous consequences. Inspect, replace tube as necessary, or . . . just plain replace anyway appears to be the safe path (tubes, after all, are relatively inexpensive; especially compared to human life and safety).

Last edited by Damocles; 06-27-2017 at 04:03 AM.
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post #3 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 05:00 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks I think I will go manual pump for reliability. Airing up was a bonehead move in that situation but it was a bit low for some of the bigger sidewall pincher rocks i saw on the way up.

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Last edited by Ghost Rider; 06-27-2017 at 05:06 AM.
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post #4 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 05:03 AM Thread Starter
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I think I will just keep an eye on the tube the front tire doesn't have much tread anyway it will be getting replaced soon

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post #5 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 10:24 AM
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You're right; low tire + rocks = pinch flats!

My club safety-checks 15 psi minimum in all bikes participating in the Shenandoah 500 AMA-sanctioned dual-sport ride, for the express purpose of preventing pinch flats.

The practice appears effective; many fewer flat tires during the event since the rule was made and enforced.
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post #6 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 01:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Damocles View Post
Well . . .

One question: Is airing UP a tire for gravel recommended? Just askin'!

=======================

As to, what to do about the run-flat tube you harbor . . . the prudent motorcyclist would demount the tire and inspect the tube. Most, however, would run it as is, keeping an eye on its pressure over forthcoming mileage. For SAFETY, I think the "book solution" would be to inspect the tube.
Well, that all depends on how far down is was, up that mountain.

There is more weight and more traction being applied to the front tire when on the front brake and traveling down hill, than when on the throttle and traveling up hill.
We wouldn't want to slip the beads and tear to valve out of the inner tube.

I'm totally surprised that did not happen on your decent Ghost Rider. It could be slipped and just shy of tearing out. I would suggest to at least inspect the tube.

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post #7 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 02:46 PM
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I always carry my manual bicycle pump with me when I'm out & about. It's not too cool looking strapped to the back of my seat, but it's never yet failed and it can set up a bead and pump up a tire pretty effectively. I think that I don't trust the electronic pumps as much as I trust my muscles...(that they are).
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post #8 of 22 Old 06-27-2017, 07:07 PM
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I always carry my manual bicycle pump with me ...........
I ride long distances across the continent on remote dirt roads where I may not see another vehicle for a day or two, so for dead solid dependability I like, Kool-Aid, carry a manual bicycle pump. Because I may change pressures often depending on the trail conditions I also carry a Dynaplug® Mini Pro Inflator for ease of use: Dynaplug® Online Store | Dynaplug® Mini Pro Inflator GT

It has a builtin light, an accurate and easy to read pressure gauge and a "no-leak hose attachment", so I don't loose half the air detaching the hose. I stay away from pumps advertising high pressures like 100 psi, 125 psi or 150 psi. I have no need for those high pressures and they pump slowly.
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post #9 of 22 Old 06-28-2017, 12:58 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
Well, that all depends on how far down is was, up that mountain.

There is more weight and more traction being applied to the front tire when on the front brake and traveling down hill, than when on the throttle and traveling up hill.
We wouldn't want to slip the beads and tear to valve out of the inner tube.

I'm totally surprised that did not happen on your decent Ghost Rider. It could be slipped and just shy of tearing out. I would suggest to at least inspect the tube.
I pretty much avoided at the use of the front brake as much as possible it was in the back of my mind the whole time

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post #10 of 22 Old 06-28-2017, 01:00 AM Thread Starter
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Was also wondering if lifting the front tire off the ground totally airing down the tube via removing the valve from the stem and then inflating again might put the tube back into a less precarious position. It's only going to be on there as long as it takes me to order a new tire and get to the shop the front tire should have been replaced last season

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