Cylinder Filled With Fuel - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 01-19-2019, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
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Cylinder Filled With Fuel

Hello, I have a KLR 650 2009. While riding the bike it sputtered and came to a stop. Fuel was draining from an overflow tube. The petcock valve was replaced with an Eagle Mike awhile back. While the carb was dissembled there was no apparent reason for this to happen. While it was apart a KLX needle was installed and jetting was changed. The snorkel had already been removed and Uni filter is being used. I’m worried about taking a long trip and this happening again… Any ideas on why this happened and how to avoid it? Maybe an easy on trail fix I can do? Thanks, Eric
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post #2 of 6 Old 01-19-2019, 08:45 PM
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Eric,

From your description, it sounds like the inlet valve to the carburetor is stuck in the open position. This is the needle valve that is controlled by the floats in the carburetor's float chamber.

If this is the problem, then what is happening is that fuel is coming into the carburetor as fast as possible, much faster than the engine can use fuel. The float chamber is filling completely and fuel is coming out of the carburetor vent tub. If it is stock with no T-Mod, then the fuel would be coming out of a pinkish hose under the seat. If the T-Mod has been done it would be coming out of wherever the T-Mod tube drains to.

It could also be that the fuel is dumping through the venturi into the clean side of the airbox and draining out of the clean-side drain tube. That would indicate another problem; that tube should be capped at the bottom and the cap is missing. I'm not even sure it is possible for that much gas to go back through the carb, the intake boot, and into the airbox.

It would be nice to know exactly where the fuel was draining from.

At any rate, you might want to drop the bowl off of the carburetor and look at the float. If the float has somehow gotten gas into it the float would sink into the gas and hold the valve open. If the needle valve is somehow hung up such that the float cannot rai and close it that would also cause the issue.

The bike sputtered to a stop because it was grossly flooded.
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post #3 of 6 Old 01-19-2019, 09:45 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the response! No T mod done yet. The float is free from holes and water tight. I replaced the needle valve just in case there was an issue with it. Fuel was draining from one of rhe bottom hoses but not to the ground but the skid plate. I had to turn the fue off to stop the drainage. I had a shop fix it (blasphemous I know) they had to drain the cylinder and did an oil change. If this happens again I need to learn how to do this myself... I’ve looked and am having a hard time finding anyone who has had this same scenario. The shop said the needle valve probably just got stuck open. I guess I can live with that assumption but it still stresses me out not knowing how to fix it myself...
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post #4 of 6 Old 01-19-2019, 10:59 PM
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The usual trail-side trick with carburetors that are flooding is to whap them firmly with a stout stick (or screwdriver handle) in an attempt to jar whatever might be stuck.

As long as you religiously remember to close the petcock when the engine is not running I'd say the worst consequence would be an engine that dies due to flooding.
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post #5 of 6 Old 01-21-2019, 11:57 AM
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The EM Yamaha Raptor manual fuel valve probably has fuel screens Inside of the fuel tank. How clean is the fuel tank & are both of the fuel screens still attached to the fuel valve?

The fuel valve probably has a 3 holed selector disc & an o-ring as repair parts. If the fuel valve handle is not used on a fairly regular basis, the handle can adhere to the rubber selector disc. Then when the handle is turned it rips a little tid bit of rubber from the lips of the selector disc. This tid bit crumb of rubber can flow down the fuel hose and jam the float valve needle open. Then the fuel valve may not be able to completely turn the fuel OFF, even when the handle is turned to Off!

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post #6 of 6 Old 01-24-2019, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
The EM Yamaha Raptor manual fuel valve probably has fuel screens Inside of the fuel tank. How clean is the fuel tank & are both of the fuel screens still attached to the fuel valve?

The fuel valve probably has a 3 holed selector disc & an o-ring as repair parts. If the fuel valve handle is not used on a fairly regular basis, the handle can adhere to the rubber selector disc. Then when the handle is turned it rips a little tid bit of rubber from the lips of the selector disc. This tid bit crumb of rubber can flow down the fuel hose and jam the float valve needle open. Then the fuel valve may not be able to completely turn the fuel OFF, even when the handle is turned to Off!
This is why I still have the stock vacuum operated petcocks and the fuel screen at the carburetor inlet introduced in 2010.
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