Tube Sizes: Interchangeability? - Page 4 - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #31 of 49 Old 05-03-2019, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Guys do it....but I'm not a fan. Consider that all real dirt bikes run tubes and most street only bikes run tube-less. My opinion is that you are more likely to be able to fix, replace or repair a tube type tire in the middle of nowhere whereas a tube-less might be easier to repair as long as the damage isn't signficant AND the tire remains seated properly on the rim......but if the damage is more significant or the tire becomes unseated then the tube-less may be difficult to impossible to repair....which isn't a good thing when you're a 6 hour hike back to civilization and it's getting dark.

Much of the angst against tubes comes from newbies with little experience changing them....it takes a bit of time but isn't a huge deal IMO.....but then I've done more than a few.

So, for me and my use, I think the tubes are something best retained.....that is until I build my new 18" rear wheels and go with the TuBliss system which offers the best of both worlds.

Dave
I tend to agree. And should you need to tighten your spokes to true your wheel later, I expect that will be a challenge.

Also, almost every flat I have had on a street bike was a puncture from a nail, screw, etc. These plug fairly well. Most off-road flats I have had were cuts in the tire from rocks or such (I don’t live in the desert so cactus needles aren’t an issue) and cuts in tubeless tires don’t plug. So, I really question just how valuable it is have to tubeless tires on an off-road machine.

Then again, you can put a tube in a tubeless tire so I would still carry a tube and patch kit so that when you put a 3/4” cut in your tubeless tire and can’t plug it, you can still patch it internally and insert a tube for good measure.

Last edited by Voyager; 05-07-2019 at 01:52 PM.
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post #32 of 49 Old 05-04-2019, 06:20 AM
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I'll throw out a puzzling question for analysis: Do tubeless tires run COOLER or HOTTER than tube-type tires? By what DELTA (plus or minus degrees; Fahrenheit, please)?

The mechanism/operational principles for the operational temperature difference, and the maintenance/operational consequences of this difference, please!

(Test data/instrumentation/procedure always appreciated.)
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post #33 of 49 Old 05-07-2019, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
I tend to agree. And should you need to tighten your spokes to true your wheel later, I expect that will be a challenge.

.
Yes; I keep forgetting to mention that sealing the spokes either prevents them from being tightened or would require you to reseal afterwards - checking and tightening the spokes is a pre-race/ride ritual for me and most other offroad riders. This alone would prevent me from trying the "tube-less" conversion.


Dave
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post #34 of 49 Old 05-08-2019, 07:04 PM
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My question was reguarding tubeless tires, All of you that answered sure threw out good reasons for not going tubeless, I would like to thank all that responded, it was appreached, you saved me from a costly mistake.
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post #35 of 49 Old 05-08-2019, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by stoner View Post
My question was reguarding tubeless tires, All of you that answered sure threw out good reasons for not going tubeless, I would like to thank all that responded, it was appreached, you saved me from a costly mistake.
Now wait a minute, stoner.

A tubeless capable tire mounted on a tube-type rim with a tube may loose air slower than a tube-type only tire, mounted on the same rim.

So Don't Avoid tubeless capable tires.

pdwestman
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post #36 of 49 Old 05-08-2019, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
And check our tire pressures at least weekly.

I highly recommend +2 psi in the front vs rear, regardless of what tires we choose to use or roads we choose to ride.

32 Front & 30 Rear is a good starting point for 160 pound rider.
This caught my attention. I've always ran those type of pressures on my previous two KLRs and on my DR650 too but after not having one for a few years and upon getting my Gen 2, I checked the service manual and it recommended pressures of 21 lbs in both the front and rear for up to 215 lbs and increasing the rear to 28 lbs for 215+ - 401 lbs. That seemed low to me but it's what I've been using. Is there a reason to use the higher pressure, particularly up front?

Thanks
Kev

(Copied From the Periodic Maintenance Table)
Air Pressure (When Cold)
Front: 150 kPa (1 .5 kgf/cm 2, 21 psi)
Rear: Up to 97.5 kg (215 Ib)
150 kPa (1 .5 kgf/cm 2, 21 psi)
97.5 - 182.0 kg (215 - 401 Ib)
200 kPa (2 .0 kgf/cm 2, 28 psi)

Last edited by VTWoodchuck; 05-09-2019 at 09:54 AM.
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post #37 of 49 Old 05-09-2019, 09:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
Now wait a minute, stoner.

A tubeless capable tire mounted on a tube-type rim with a tube may loose air slower than a tube-type only tire, mounted on the same rim.

So Don't Avoid tubeless capable tires.
I don't think so; unless you seal the spoke nipples the tire doesn't hold any air in that scenario. That said, there is no reason to avoid tubeless tires (with a tube) on your KLR except maybe for reports that they may be a bit tighter to mount which wouldn't make me hesitate.

Dave
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post #38 of 49 Old 05-09-2019, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VTWoodchuck View Post
This caught my attention. I've always ran those type of pressures on my previous two KLRs and on my DR650 too but after not having one for a few years and upon getting my Gen 2, I checked the service manual and it recommended pressures of 21 lbs in both the front and rear for up to 215 lbs and increasing the rear to 28 lbs for 215+ - 401 lbs. That seemed low to me but it's what I've been using what I've been using. Is there a reason to use the higher pressure, particularly up front?

Thanks
Kev

(Copied From the Periodic Maintenance Table)
Air Pressure (When Cold)
Front: 150 kPa (1 .5 kgf/cm 2, 21 psi)
Rear: Up to 97.5 kg (215 Ib)
150 kPa (1 .5 kgf/cm 2, 21 psi)
97.5 - 182.0 kg (215 - 401 Ib)
200 kPa (2 .0 kgf/cm 2, 28 psi)

Not to speak for Paul but the manual is a generic guide that gives you pressures that will work anywhere but aren't the best in every scenario. I'd also note that the recommendation for more air in the rear is geared towards a heavy load or 2 up - I'm with Paul and run 2 psi higher on the front as the front tire has a smaller air volume and takes bigger impacts than the rear (I don't ride heavily loaded). Having more pressure in the front helps avoid pinch flats. 20-22 rear and 22-24 front (+/- 2psi) is what I use most of the time in mine.....my riding is a mix of around town and offroad. since I'm lazy, I don't air up and down depending on conditions though If I was going on a long highway ride, I'd bump it to 30 psi +/-



Dave
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post #39 of 49 Old 05-09-2019, 12:53 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Not to speak for Paul but the manual is a generic guide that gives you pressures that will work anywhere but aren't the best in every scenario. I'd also note that the recommendation for more air in the rear is geared towards a heavy load or 2 up - I'm with Paul and run 2 psi higher on the front as the front tire has a smaller air volume and takes bigger impacts than the rear (I don't ride heavily loaded). Having more pressure in the front helps avoid pinch flats. 20-22 rear and 22-24 front (+/- 2psi) is what I use most of the time in mine.....my riding is a mix of around town and offroad. since I'm lazy, I don't air up and down depending on conditions though If I was going on a long highway ride, I'd bump it to 30 psi +/-



Dave
I have to say, after trying Pauls' recommendations the feels were definitely better. But I ride pavement and the dirt is different.

2017 KLR in black
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post #40 of 49 Old 05-09-2019, 01:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Not to speak for Paul but the manual is a generic guide that gives you pressures that will work anywhere but aren't the best in every scenario. I'd also note that the recommendation for more air in the rear is geared towards a heavy load or 2 up - I'm with Paul and run 2 psi higher on the front as the front tire has a smaller air volume and takes bigger impacts than the rear (I don't ride heavily loaded). Having more pressure in the front helps avoid pinch flats. 20-22 rear and 22-24 front (+/- 2psi) is what I use most of the time in mine.....my riding is a mix of around town and offroad. since I'm lazy, I don't air up and down depending on conditions though If I was going on a long highway ride, I'd bump it to 30 psi +/-


Dave
Thanks Dave. That's pretty much what I do. I was mostly curious about the 32 lb for the front because it is about 30% higher than the spec. Prior to reading the spec I had always ran the higher pressure because intuitively it seems like it would be better for tire wear on the asphalt.

Kev
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