Total rebuild, not qualified, trying lots of things - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #1 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 12:05 PM Thread Starter
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Total rebuild, not qualified, trying lots of things

My '08 is in pieces in my home. It all started with a broken passenger peg bolt in the subframe, and became a dig to discover and address every issue. Then it became an opportunity to remake and make new and novel, with practicality being a focus.
  • Engine: 685 + whatever to fix oil issue. Inspect lower case and go from there: New clutch plates, doohickey, fix broken lower motor mount, whatever else I find.
  • Frame: New (to me) subframe came in black, so i might make the frame black too. Figure out a good rad guard system for nakedness. I'm not putting any fairing plastics back on, done with that. I'm inclined to stick with the stock tank (concerned about ims issues) so maybe a jns type rad plate with some crash guards (don't have those yet).
  • Wiring: The real scary part for me. Planning a techtrail display, 7" round led light with front mount for that and turn signals, led rear lights thingy. I guess I'll be creating my own harness at some point. Maybe I should get a better multimeter. And then take a class in multimetering.

I want to be able to haul a bit, so I'm not going scrambler/cafe really, although I like the headlight look on them. I will have a handlebar (?) mounted occasional windshield. I have a Tusk pannier frame and bag set, I think I will use that. Usually the bags stay home, but groceries! Fenders will be modified, haven't thought that far yet. Little tweaks are planned or done already: Eagle Mike subframe bolt fix-done, rebuild brakes with braided lines and any cheapish upgrades I can do there, rebuild carb/airbox with same intention, replace all hoses and tubes, check/replace/upgrade bolts, consider tbob, send off cogent moab shock to be rebuilt, do front shock service.

Any ideas for what you'd do in my situ? Everything is off the frame. I haven't written on every issue, but I thought I might start a thread where I can consolidate my process. And any ideas that might send me even deeper down the rabbit hole are welcome! Except a kickstart. That's a step or three beyond me.
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post #2 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 04:20 PM
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There are plenty of issues with the IMS 10, but none with the IMS 6.6. Well, except that it doesn't fit all that well on a Gen 2...

However, since you are in as far as you are, are contemplating building your own harness, have a good attitude toward it all, and are fearless, you really should consider the IMS 6.6. There are so many upsides that it is worthy. At the same time, though, I think the JNS radiator guard is an excellent idea.

I'd like to follow along and watch this build.

Here are a couple of links to articles on the Gen 2/IMS 6.6.
https://www.souperdoo.com/stuff%20th...emi-round-hole
http://www.souperdoo.com/stuff%20tha...s-to-newcastle
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post #3 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 05:57 PM
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Regarding the wiring, be sure to use different colors and the proper gauge. Also, use quality end connections/terminations and use the appropriate crimping tool. I tend to crimp AND solder those garden-variety spade connectors after removing the plastic barrel and sliding it up the wire. I then slide the barrel down over my crimped and soldered connection. And do NOT use acid core solder, only rosin core for electrical components.

Jason
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post #4 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 06:37 PM Thread Starter
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Hi Tom,

I'm happy for your attention, I've seen your youtube/website offerings and they've been instrumental in inspiring me to tackle this.
It will be slow going, but I have no deadline and much motivation to do things slow and right.

I was considering the ims 6.6, but these statements from the ims website give me pause:

"Drain your Tank
After every ride, Drain the Fuel from your tank. This will help limit discoloration of the tank by the fuel. Generally you can expect a natural colored tank to adjust its color to whatever color your fuel is. Draining the fuel after you are done riding will slow this process as well as limiting any breakdown damage occurring from the naturally volatile additives and other compounds found in today's fuel.
Ethanol is not your friend
Trace amounts of ethanol can be found in many of today's fuels and ethanol is naturally destructive to plastics and rubbers. Find a fuel source that you feel confident is free of ethanol to prevent early wear on your tank, seals and gaskets."

This breakdown of materials, and somewhat impractical prevention and maintenance issues lead me to questions.
Is this practical for a bike that, when finished, will only find occasional shelter under a tarp? It will ride to lands with varying quality of fuel available and will not be drained unless it has service issues requiring it. So, with solar and fuel exposure high and constant, how long before "breakdown damage" sets in, beyond cosmetic? The stock tank could serve, and I could/will spend the $300-350 quickly on other issues.

The carrying weight lower, radiator protection, easy compensator for crappy plastics benefits aren't lost on me, but I'm still leaning toward stock tank, crash bars, and rad plate for a bit more bulletproof-ness, less maintenance concerns, and more stable mounting points for lights/front panniers/pistol holsters and the like.
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post #5 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Hi Jason,

Thank you for the soldering advice. Rosin core it is. Another skill I get to learn. I get to ignore wiring for a while but I am looking to acquire the tools and materials I will need to deal. I have a cheap Harbor Freight multi-meter currently (heh), and I wonder if I should invest in a Klein with more/different functionality. I have the crimp tool, soldering gun, and boxes of connectors and shrink tubes and such. And a big tube of dielectric grease. I will buy bulk wire and heed your advice on colors and correct gauges.

I wonder about changing fuse types (not resistance but shape), practical junction points, and integrating trailtech wiring with/instead of stock.
I will wonder more later.
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post #6 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 08:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottStearns View Post
I have a cheap Harbor Freight multi-meter currently (heh), and I wonder if I should invest in a Klein with more/different functionality.
A cheap multi-meter is plenty good enough for building a wiring harness. Typically you'll be checking continuity and resistance and every multi-meter I've seen is more than capable of handling those two simple tasks. If you're just itching to buy a better meter I recommend Fluke, but you certainly don't need it for constructing a wiring harness.

Jason
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post #7 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 08:21 PM
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Paging @DPelletier for comment on the discoloration and breakdown of a translucent IMS. That's a new one for me, but then I have always had black IMS.

I'm not a fan of soldering wire harnesses. I think that it adds a stress riser to the wire/terminal junction. There are no harnesses in planes, cars, motorcycles, satellites, etc. that, these days, are soldered. Pretty much a thing of the past. That said, harnesses should be built with quality open-barrel terminals in high-quality connectors such as the Sumitomo connectors. If you tool yourself to work with .090" open barrel terminals you can re-use the OEM connectors, for that is what they are, by and large. You simply need to identify the connector and order the terminals. These connectors and terminals have good connectivity and built-in strain relief.

The fuses that are in your '08 are very good. If you want an accessory fuse box there are several on the market (e.g. Eastern Beaver PC-8) or you can roll your own with a Bandit box or somesuch.

If/when you want to know more about harness building, tools, where to buy stuff, just ask. I can drone on and on for hours about it.

Tom [email protected]

The kid poured him another straight rye and I think he doctored it with water down behind the bar because when he came up with it he looked as guilty as if he'd kicked his grandmother. -Philip Marlowe

'Why' and 'How' are words so important they cannot be too often used. -Napoleon Bonaparte

Sting like a butterfly.
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post #8 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 08:26 PM
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I will recommend Keeping The OEM color coding of your home-made wiring harness. This will make any future electrical issue much easier to deal with.

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting

Last edited by pdwestman; 07-13-2019 at 08:29 PM.
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post #9 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 09:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
I'm not a fan of soldering wire harnesses. I think that it adds a stress riser to the wire/terminal junction. There are no harnesses in planes, cars, motorcycles, satellites, etc. that, these days, are soldered.
No, there are no soldered connections in car or motorcycle harnesses; it's way too expensive. Perhaps I've lived a sheltered life, but I've never seen a soldered end connection on any car or motorcycle harness, regardless of how old it was.

In my previous post I suggested using quality connectors and the appropriate crimping tool. However, for those instances where you may be forced to use those garden-variety spade connectors and do not have a proper crimping tool, then adding solder provides a more secure connection. Also I suggested pushing the plastic barrel insulator back down over the soldered connection. The stress in the wire when subjected to a bending moment will be the same as a crimped joint. The highest stress will be at the point where the wire contacts the insulator, which is the same for both connections.

Jason
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post #10 of 17 Old 07-13-2019, 09:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
I will recommend Keeping The OEM color coding of your home-made wiring harness. This will make any future electrical issue much easier to deal with.
Yes, that's a great idea.

Jason
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