Does not respond immediately to the accelerator at highway speed - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 22 Old 07-16-2019, 01:05 PM Thread Starter
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Does not respond immediately to the accelerator at highway speed

Does not respond immediately to the accelerator at highway speed.
When I travel at highway speed, 60 mph or 4,000 rpm and accelerate, sometimes the engine does not respond immediately, I feel a delay and then it accelerates. I have used additive in gasoline to clean the carburetor and it has not improved. The last time I cleaned and oiled the air filter was in March, at 19,004 miles. Now it has 21,000 miles. I'm going to look at it and clean it again, although my driving is usually on streets and highways and less than 10% off the road. What else could it be?

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post #2 of 22 Old 07-16-2019, 01:07 PM Thread Starter
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When I see the filter I will send some pictures

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post #3 of 22 Old 07-16-2019, 03:38 PM
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The KLR's carburetor is of the, CV, design. All CV carburetors have an inherent delay between the time the throttle opens and the slide rises.

Given that, "fact-of-life," if your delay still seems excessive, the videos in the, "Carb Overhaul" thread on this website can walk you through a thorough cleaning/adjustment.

Some KLRistas hog out the vacuum transfer port in their slide by drilling it out to a 7/64" diameter. an effort in hope of improving throttle response.

Recommended: "Care and Feeding of the CVK 40," cited on this website, but accessible from Googling.

“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre
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post #4 of 22 Old 07-16-2019, 07:19 PM
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Check for a hole in your carburetor diaphragm.

Jason
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post #5 of 22 Old 07-16-2019, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norton 850 View Post
Check for a hole in your carburetor diaphragm.

Jason
IME, any hole in the throttle slide diaphragm or pinch in the sealing ridge usually prevents speeds above 60 mph, rather than reducing response. But anything is possible.

pdwestman
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post #6 of 22 Old 07-17-2019, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
IME, any hole in the throttle slide diaphragm or pinch in the sealing ridge usually prevents speeds above 60 mph, rather than reducing response. But anything is possible.
Indeed reduced top speed along with poor gas mileage are common symptoms of a leaky diaphragm.

But it sounds as if the problem came-on suddenly and I was trying to think of a fuel-related component that could perish with age. The diaphragm certainly can develop a small crack or hole with age but perhaps it's not the best good candidate for creating hesitation. But if the carburetor is over ten years old it may be a good idea to check the diaphragm anyway. And in the process of doing so, the real problem may uncover itself.

Jason
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post #7 of 22 Old 07-17-2019, 12:10 PM
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@Dicky,

Your bike is only three years old and it doesn't sit around. You've ridden it quite a bit. At that age and with that mileage your carb shouldn't need service. However, I don't know what the general quality of gas is in Panama.

My takeaway from your opening post is that you have noticed a difference in the way the bike behaves and that it is a bit intermittent.

Using an additive in the fuel should clean things up but it may take time. It may also not treat an issue with the slide if that is the problem.

Given the age of your bike, I am going to assume that you've never had the carb off, so there shouldn't be any mis-assembly issues with it.

If it were my bike I would give the additive a tank or two to do its job, especially if there were no running issues other than throttle response. If it doesn't clear up then I'd rotate the carb so that I could remove the top cover and lift the spring out. Then I'd put my finger in the bore of the slide and gently test for its ability to slide up and down smoothly. I'd inspect the slide and its bore for crud, goo, varnish, evidence of sliding wear that has created burrs, and embedded grit. In short, anything that would inhibit it from sliding up and down freely. Have a look at the diaphragm as well.

Let us know what you find. I do have to note, based upon talking with scores of people who have worked on their own carburetors, that the biggest problem with them is that they do more harm putting it back together than they had when they took it apart. That's why I'm suggesting only a partial disassembly to the part most likely to create a cause and effect. Be very careful with the re-assembly of the slide and cover when you put it back together.

Tom [email protected]

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post #8 of 22 Old 07-17-2019, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
@Dicky,

Your bike is only three years old and it doesn't sit around.
Whoa, I'm impressed! How do you know the bike is only three years old--clairvoyant? Seriously, how do you know, secret connections?

The hesitation symptoms that have been described sound like a lean condition. Perhaps there is an air leak around the intake boot? It's easy to inspect the metal-band clamp that connects the intake boot to the carburetor for tightness. Also with the engine running at idle, spraying WD-40 on the boot and especially at the boot to head interface is easy an test to do as well. Any change in idle speed after spraying WD-40 suggests an air leak.

Jason
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post #9 of 22 Old 07-17-2019, 01:22 PM
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Another possibility, as Tom posts above: Sticky slide. Slide should move freely up and down when manipulated. Sticking on the way up could cause the "hesitation" experienced, IMHO.

Don't see how a leaky diaphragm causes, "poor gas mileage," as mentioned above. Leaky diaphragm = fuel-lean mixture, IMHO, because needle cannot rise adequately to uncover main jet sufficiently. Not a satisfactory condition by any means, just . . . don't see how the circumstance causes poor fuel mileage. Maybe it does, after all!

===========================

EDIT: Acknowledging Tom's previous nomination of the sticky slide; reckon I overlooked the comment or we posted neo-simultaneously!

“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre

Last edited by Damocles; 07-17-2019 at 05:41 PM.
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post #10 of 22 Old 07-17-2019, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
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Tom,

It seems appropriate to wait for two tanks of gasoline to see the result of the additive. The fuel in Panama is good, besides I only use 95 on the bike. This is how you comment, nobody has touched the carburetor and usually I am afraid of the mechanics, if I am not clear about the diagnosis. LOL. For now I will wait and clean the air filter. I remained pending to comment on the result and the action that I will take after the two tanks.

Thanks to everyone who contributed their opinion.

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