My Ongoing Project - Page 6 - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #51 of 61 Old 09-21-2019, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
"Per Second Per Second" is as about as meaningful and as accurate as "I ain't got no", in my book.

ps, Ah jeese, you edited for explanation!
Actually, I only edited for, "Neatness, originality, and aptness of thought!"

If you unleash Google on, "per second per second," you'll see more hits than anyone might read in a lifetime.

Basically, let's say gravitational acceleration is 32 feet per second per second. This statement means, an object falling (in a vacuum) will reach a speed of 32 feet per second at the end of the first second, and . . . a speed of 64 feet per second at the end of the second second, and . . . a speed of 96 feet per second at the end of the third second . . . and so on.

For every second the object falls, its speed will increase by 32 feet per second.

One (of many!) definitions on the Internet:

----------------------------------
American: per second per second Example sentences
per second per second in American
a unit used for acceleration when the change in velocity per second is divided by the change in time, which is also in seconds: e.g., if the velocity increased from 5 meters per second to 20 meters per second in a time interval of one second, the acceleration would be 15 meters per second per second (15 m/sec./sec. or 15/m/sec.2)
Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright © 2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
-----------------------------------

Not the best, nor most understandable definition on the 'Net, IMHO. One of the better ones said, "Think of 'per second per second' as, 'per second (per second).'"

Truth be told: I struggle to grasp the concept, myself!

“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre
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post #52 of 61 Old 09-22-2019, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
"I'm no sage", Tom said spicily.
Please stop.
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post #53 of 61 Old 09-23-2019, 12:46 AM Thread Starter
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How do I make sure the timing is right when I put the chain back on the cam shaft sprockets? I didn't mark them or anything, although it seems like a good idea now. It seems like it would be difficult to get it right by eyeballing it.
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post #54 of 61 Old 09-23-2019, 06:08 AM
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How do I make sure the timing is right when I put the chain back on the cam shaft sprockets? I didn't mark them or anything, although it seems like a good idea now. It seems like it would be difficult to get it right by eyeballing it.
The cam chain has no compass (or perhaps, no conscience). At piston TDC (from turning engine (turn engine counterclockwise 'til "T" mark on rotor aligns with index mark on timing hole) , set cams at TDC by use of witness and index marks. Cam chain tensioner disassembled (and reset). Set cams with both sprocket arrows pointing forward, arrow end marks parallel to the top edge of the cylinder head.

45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing.

All this (and lots more minutiae omitted) is in Service Manuals; hope you have a copy.

OH YES. STUFF RAGS AROUND THE CAM CHAIN TUNNEL AS YOU WORK; DON'T WANT TO DROP ANYTHING DOWN INTO THE ENGINE INNARDS.

“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre
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post #55 of 61 Old 09-23-2019, 09:59 AM
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Damocles forgot to say, 'Start cam shaft installation by pulling chain slack up on the forward side of engine, then engage with the Exhaust cam arrow pointing near level or just above gasket surface.'

Well actually, he sorta' did,
"45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing. "

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting
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post #56 of 61 Old 09-23-2019, 10:50 AM
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In case you don't have a workshop manual, attached are pics that will help with timing the camshafts.

And if in fact you don't have a workshop manual, you really should get one, especially if you plan to keep your KLR for any length of time.

Jason
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Lazy T.JPG (49.3 KB, 7 views)
File Type: jpg CamTiming.JPG (98.3 KB, 7 views)

Last edited by Norton 850; 09-23-2019 at 12:48 PM. Reason: correcting grammar
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post #57 of 61 Old 09-23-2019, 12:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
Damocles forgot to say, 'Start cam shaft installation by pulling chain slack up on the forward side of engine, then engage with the Exhaust cam arrow pointing near level or just above gasket surface.'

Well actually, he sorta' did,
"45 chain links exist between exhaust cam chain sprocket arrow head (point), and intake cam shaft arrow end (dull end). Apply tension to forward segment of cam chain when installing. "
I apologize for my, "Failure to communicate!"

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“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre
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post #58 of 61 Old 09-26-2019, 08:50 AM
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Sorry about the late post, I've been stalking this conversation and needed to offer explanation for the audacity of the French.
France: With a population of approximately 65.13 million people, a land area of 213,010.630385 sq miles, not counting off continent territories, and a gross GDP of 2777.54 billion US dollars in 2018. Which entitles them today, as it did when Lagrange et al. were proclaiming standards, to rule the known world in their own minds. Which reminds me of California, Population 39.75 million, GDP of $3.018 trillion gross state product as of 2018, substantially more than that of France, but I digress.
When I lived in France to learn the language before moving to Africa, a French friend politely explained to me why the French have such a self perception. He stated, "The national symbol of France is the Cock (male rooster), and as you will find anywhere in the world the Rooster is the king of his domain, be it a small pile of rubbish or a large barn yard." This in spite of the fact that any of the other animals in said place can easily squash him with an accidental misstep. (As proven by various wars and conflicts.)
There you have it, a totally complete explanation of why the metre is now the standard measure in most of the known world and not the barley corn.
Back to productive KLR parlance (Which by the way is derived from the French verb parler; to speak).
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post #59 of 61 Old 09-27-2019, 03:17 PM Thread Starter
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Okay. The French national character aside. Let's come up to speed with the project at hand. Perhaps it will be as amusing to others as it is frustrating to me.

I had my valve cover off and the camshafts removed waiting for my four new valve shims to arrive. During that time I pulled my carburetor off and I think I discovered that the Starter Jet was plugged. It seemed plugged. I think I cleared it. I reassembled the carb and put it back on, giddy with the prospect of soon having a running bike.

The shims arrived yesterday. Of course one of them was totally the wrong one. I opted to leave the exhaust valves the way they were, just on the edge of being (but not being) too tight. When the replacement shim for the replacement shim comes in I will do it all again. No big deal.

I carefully reassembled the camshafts, valve cover, etc. One thing slightly concerned me. After I got the camshafts and caps back on the Clymer manual (but not the shop manual) said to turn the crankshaft backwards several times and then line up everything again. So I did, but when I did the arrows on the camshaft sprockets weren't quite parallel with the top of the engine. But the difference was so slight I thought jumping the chain one link (which would be a real pain) would throw it way off. Whatever. It's close enough.

So, I put everything back together and turned on the petcock. I have a manual petcock which I recently put on because the original vacuum operated petcock was spraying gas on my leg when I rode the bike. So I opened this petcock and soon noticed gas all over the floor of the carport. It was coming from the pink hose that runs under the seat. I drained the float bowl and I got way more gas out of it than the float bowl could possibly hold.

I don't really have a question. I just shut the petcock off and walked away to get a beer. I checked the oil level and it looked okay, so I guess it didn't dump too much gas into the crankcase. I assume the float valve malfunctioned, but I'm not really into taking the carb off again today. I'll look at it tomorrow. *sigh*
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post #60 of 61 Old 09-27-2019, 05:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skook View Post
Okay. The French national character aside. Let's come up to speed with the project at hand. Perhaps it will be as amusing to others as it is frustrating to me.

I had my valve cover off and the camshafts removed waiting for my four new valve shims to arrive. During that time I pulled my carburetor off and I think I discovered that the Starter Jet was plugged. It seemed plugged. I think I cleared it. I reassembled the carb and put it back on, giddy with the prospect of soon having a running bike.

The shims arrived yesterday. Of course one of them was totally the wrong one. I opted to leave the exhaust valves the way they were, just on the edge of being (but not being) too tight. When the replacement shim for the replacement shim comes in I will do it all again. No big deal.

I carefully reassembled the camshafts, valve cover, etc. One thing slightly concerned me. After I got the camshafts and caps back on the Clymer manual (but not the shop manual) said to turn the crankshaft backwards several times and then line up everything again. So I did, but when I did the arrows on the camshaft sprockets weren't quite parallel with the top of the engine. But the difference was so slight I thought jumping the chain one link (which would be a real pain) would throw it way off. Whatever. It's close enough.

So, I put everything back together and turned on the petcock. I have a manual petcock which I recently put on because the original vacuum operated petcock was spraying gas on my leg when I rode the bike. So I opened this petcock and soon noticed gas all over the floor of the carport. It was coming from the pink hose that runs under the seat. I drained the float bowl and I got way more gas out of it than the float bowl could possibly hold.

I don't really have a question. I just shut the petcock off and walked away to get a beer. I checked the oil level and it looked okay, so I guess it didn't dump too much gas into the crankcase. I assume the float valve malfunctioned, but I'm not really into taking the carb off again today. I'll look at it tomorrow. *sigh*
Here's an idea for you after you finish your beer/s. Tap on the carburetor float bowl with a screw driver handle or piece of wood. Turn the petcock on and watch for any gas overflow. If you see signs of flooding tap the float bowl again without turning off the gas. If after six or so taps the fuel continues to overflow, turn the petcock off drink another beer and wait until tomorrow to remove the carburetor.

After removing the carburetor, remove the float bowl and examine the tip of the float needle for any signs of damage. Even if it looks OK you may want to replace the needle with a new OEM one, since the carburetor is already apart. However, the source of your leak may just be a float needle that wasn't clipped to the float assembly, which is an easy fix!

Jason
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