Smoke on startup - Page 3 - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

 9Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #21 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
1st Gear
 
Schoen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 42
Found the rest of that valve cover bolt. Before I find out whether I'll need the Helicoil, looks like I'm going to need a Grabit.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Broken bolt in stud.jpg (51.9 KB, 10 views)
Schoen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #22 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 07:08 PM
OverDrive
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lander, Wyoming
Posts: 5,537
A sharp AWL and some patience or even a pencil ERASER and some patience many unscrew the broken stub.

I'll suggest to NOT USE any RH rotation drill bit on it! Purchase a set of LH drill bits if the above tips are un-successful.

The threads should be 'perfectly fine'. JUST Don't bugger up the exposed aluminum above the broken stub!!!!!

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting

Last edited by pdwestman; 09-28-2019 at 07:11 PM. Reason: added sentence
pdwestman is offline  
post #23 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 07:21 PM
2nd Gear
 
Norton 850's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 133
Sorry to see that dutchman, but it was certainly no surprise.

The good news is that your dutchman is not preloaded, so it should be fairly easy to remove. However, take no short cuts when preparing for its removal. If it were me I would first take a Dremel tool with a small globe-shaped stone and make a dimple about 1/16" deep in the center of the broken face of the dutchman. Then using a hammer and a sharp prick punch make a sharp dimple in the center of the previously made dimple. Next using an appropriately sized drill bit for the "Easyout" you selected, drill a hole using the prick punch dimple as a centering guide. Insert the Easyout into the hole you just drilled and give it a light tap with a hammer. Lastly, using a wrench, start rotating the Easyout to the left and the dutchman should come right out.

I would then drill, tap and install a Hellicoil sized to match the thread on the valve cover bolt. Obviously you'll need to buy an new bolt from Kawasaki. Lastly, I would buy new sealing washers for the valve cover bolts, and perhaps a new valve cover gasket.

Of course before grinding, drilling and tapping, you need to take whatever means necessary to keep debris out of the head. Probably stuff some rags around the area you will be working on.

Jason

Last edited by Norton 850; 09-28-2019 at 07:24 PM.
Norton 850 is offline  
 
post #24 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 07:31 PM
2nd Gear
 
Norton 850's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 133
Well, I guess Paul was responding while I was typing my response.

I'm not sure why a right-hand drill bit would be a bad thing.

And I would take no chances with the threads, as I feel confident they have been compromised. A Helicoil repair is not too expensive or difficult and produces quality results, so why not do it?

Jason
Norton 850 is offline  
post #25 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 07:52 PM
OverDrive
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lander, Wyoming
Posts: 5,537
A right hand drill bit may snag and screw the stub IN farther & Harder. A Left hand drill bit may snag & simply un-screw the stub.

I'm confident that the original threads are NOT compromised, otherwise the stub wouldn't have broken, the threads would have stripped.

The sealing washers & valve cover gasket need to be torqued to a Mere 60-70 INCH pounds, or just snug. The elasticity & grip of the rubber parts keeps the bolts from backing out.

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting
pdwestman is offline  
post #26 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 07:57 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norton 850 View Post
Sorry to see that dutchman, but it was certainly no surprise.

The good news is that your dutchman is not preloaded, so it should be fairly easy to remove. However, take no short cuts when preparing for its removal. If it were me I would first take a Dremel tool with a small globe-shaped stone and make a dimple about 1/16" deep in the center of the broken face of the dutchman. Then using a hammer and a sharp prick punch make a sharp dimple in the center of the previously made dimple. Next using an appropriately sized drill bit for the "Easyout" you selected, drill a hole using the prick punch dimple as a centering guide. Insert the Easyout into the hole you just drilled and give it a light tap with a hammer. Lastly, using a wrench, start rotating the Easyout to the left and the dutchman should come right out.

I would then drill, tap and install a Hellicoil sized to match the thread on the valve cover bolt. Obviously you'll need to buy an new bolt from Kawasaki. Lastly, I would buy new sealing washers for the valve cover bolts, and perhaps a new valve cover gasket.

Of course before grinding, drilling and tapping, you need to take whatever means necessary to keep debris out of the head. Probably stuff some rags around the area you will be working on.

Jason
There is a good chance that now that the bolt is not under load it will turn out with very little torque. Using your center dimpling suggestion and the left handed drill bit that pdwestman suggested the bolt will likely come out with the torque from the left handed bit biting in as it cuts down. It might even come out by tapping counter clockwise with a sharp punch.
GoMotor is offline  
post #27 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 08:04 PM
2nd Gear
 
Norton 850's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
A right hand drill bit may snag and screw the stub IN farther & Harder. A Left hand drill bit may snag & simply un-screw the stub.

I'm confident that the original threads are NOT compromised, otherwise the stub wouldn't have broken, the threads would have stripped.
The torque via a right-hand drill bit is negligible. The most important aspect of drilling ANY hole in the dutchman is to make damn sure it's in the center, hence my two-step process.

Regarding the condition of the threads, I typically see the threads at this particular location stripped rather than the bolt twisted apart. Seeing the broken bolt highly suggests that the female threads have been subjected to stresses beyond the yield strength of the relatively soft aluminum material. So why take a chance on trying to re-use them when it's easy to make a quality repair?

Jason
Norton 850 is offline  
post #28 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 08:12 PM
2nd Gear
 
Norton 850's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoMotor View Post
There is a good chance that now that the bolt is not under load it will turn out with very little torque. Using your center dimpling suggestion and the left handed drill bit that pdwestman suggested the bolt will likely come out with the torque from the left handed bit biting in as it cuts down. It might even come out by tapping counter clockwise with a sharp punch.
Maybe a left-hand drill bit will work, but a person should be able to come up with an easyout and right-hand drill bit quicker than a left-hand drill bit. So why not?

I can see I'm swatting at an empty pinata here, so I'm through with this discussion.

Jason
Norton 850 is offline  
post #29 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 09:20 PM
4th Gear
 
GoMotor's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,248
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norton 850 View Post
Maybe a left-hand drill bit will work, but a person should be able to come up with an easyout and right-hand drill bit quicker than a left-hand drill bit. So why not?

I can see I'm swatting at an empty pinata here, so I'm through with this discussion.

Jason
I see your point. The bolt is likely bottomed out already and either bit would get the job done and easy-outs are easier to find than left handed bits. So it is an owner's choice.
GoMotor is offline  
post #30 of 45 Old 09-28-2019, 09:39 PM
OverDrive
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lander, Wyoming
Posts: 5,537
The broken stub really should NOT be bottomed out. And we do NOT want to 'jam' it in by using a RH drill bit.

I should have suggested the pencil eraser FIRST! Then the sharp awl. Then the LH drill bit. Then the easy out, which is never 'easy'!

And I'm trying to prevent having to use rags & vacuum cleaner & drills and untold time to fix what may be a Very SIMPLE problem, if approached with care & forethought.

pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 85,000+ miles & counting
pdwestman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome