Dealer won't work on bikes over 10 years old - Page 2 - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #11 of 24 Unread 11-04-2019, 05:25 PM
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But even 1-5 year old bikes can be mis-maintained & abused / crashed to the point of not being cost effective to re-condition.

Dealerships & independant repair facilities always have to use discretion when discussing repairs & maintenance.

I'll give an estimate, but I will not give a Bid for repairs. One never knows what you'll run into, until the job is totally done. Like GoMotors own recent engine swap/rebuild.

pdwestman
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post #12 of 24 Unread 11-05-2019, 07:27 AM
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Just a few years ago, I had to take my '97 Concours in to the dealer for a shifter return spring repair. They said nothing then about older age bikes being repaired.
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post #13 of 24 Unread 11-05-2019, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norton 850 View Post
I think part of the reason many dealers refuse to work on bikes older than 10 years has to do with the price of repairs versus the value of the bike. For instance, a mid 80's Yamaha Virago may need some $1,300 worth of repairs at the dealer and the bike may be worth only $1,200. Plus, even the dealer may have difficulty obtaining parts for a bike that old. So, in this instance, most bike owners would not opt to spend $1,300 on a bike that's worth $1,200.

Jason
1) Many bikes (DR650, XR650L, etc. etc.) have long production runs well in excess of the 10 years bandied about here.

2) The cost of parts/repair vs. the cost of the bike should be the OWNER"S choice, should it not? Usually how it works is that you take the bike in for a diagnosis/estimate and that work is billable regardless of whether or not the Owner decides to proceed. IME Many dealers will throw out a rough budget for bikes like your Virago exaple.


Dave
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post #14 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 06:51 PM
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What work you cant do yourself find a good independent who you can trust. gen 2 KLR parts should be good thru 2028. Last year + 10
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post #15 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 07:00 PM
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I have a 35 year-old Honda XR350. Guess I'm on my own, eh?

The idea that a dealer won't do the work because the bike isn't worth it, is silly. A $500 repair is $500 in revenue, even if the bike isn't worth scrap. But yeah, the dealer could have any number of reasons, and it's their decision: they don't have to take your money.

If it's a "worthless" bike, but the owner loves it and wants to keep it running, there will be someone who will do the work. With my 1984 XR350, I may need to rebuild the engine. Seems like a good time to learn how to rebuild an engine...
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Last edited by KBS; 11-06-2019 at 07:25 PM.
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post #16 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
1) Many bikes (DR650, XR650L, etc. etc.) have long production runs well in excess of the 10 years bandied about here.

2) The cost of parts/repair vs. the cost of the bike should be the OWNER"S choice, should it not? Usually how it works is that you take the bike in for a diagnosis/estimate and that work is billable regardless of whether or not the Owner decides to proceed. IME Many dealers will throw out a rough budget for bikes like your Virago exaple.


Dave
I agree that it should be the bike owner's decision regarding repair costs.

But what happens is that dealers will get several OLDER bikes that that the owners are on the fence about repair costs, owing to the imbalance between repair cost and bike worth. So the older bikes start to pile up at the dealer and there becomes a time when bike storage is a problem. The bikes are typically rolled outside during the day and then rolled inside the building at closing time. And depending on the quantity of clunkers, real estate becomes scarce. So the dealer ends up storing a clunker for lord knows how long, which is not profitable. And then there's the parts problem. Dealers are obligated to repair with new components, so if they get part way through the repair of an older bike and cannot get a part from the mother ship, they're sort of stuck, as they cannot charge the customer for an incomplete repair.

Essentially, it's just not worth the dealership's time or storage space to attempt repairs on ten (10) plus year old bikes.

Jason
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post #17 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 08:00 PM
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I may be wrong and it may depend on jurisdiction, but it's my understanding that if you turn your vehicle over to a shop and then don't pay the repair bill, the shop owner can legally keep your vehicle until you do pay it.

Could this have anything to do with this policy? I can't imagine the legal wrangling involved if a shop owner had to take such a thing to court in order to sell the vehicle to recoup unpaid bills. Maybe it happens all the time: I don't know. It might make a shop owner think twice about doing 2K worth of work on a motorcycle that Blue Books for 1K. And, just because it's worth 1K doesn't guarantee you can sell it for that much, if you can sell it at all. They might be stuck with it for awhile.

I bought my current ride at a larger, multi-brand dealer, but even if they were still a Suzuki dealer (they're not) I wouldn't take it back there to be worked on. I'd rather deal with a smaller, family-owned shop that's been in the same place for 50 years that's right down the street from me. They don't sell Suzukis, but I bought a battery from them and am going to order some tires from them next Spring and have them put them on for me.

In the few times I've been in there I let them know I respect the fact that they've been in business for half a century and will be relying on their expertise and obvious business savvy in the future, and I mean it: I'm not just kissing their ass to stand out. I remember going into that place when I was 6 years old and my older brother had motorcycles. You don't stay in business in a small market for 50 years if you don't treat people right. Hopefully this will establish a relationship I can count on if I need something more serious taken care of down the road.

Yeah, I most likely could get the tires cheaper if I bought them online and took them in with me to just be mounted, but I'd rather just do the whole deal with them if they're willing to get the tires I want and sell them to me. I do things like that and, down the line, I might need something done and they might very well say, "Well, even though we're not a Suzuki dealer we'll help you out because you've been good to do business with us for awhile. We don't care if your motorcycle is 10 years old and it's one we've never worked on before."

Plus, I've already decided my next motorcycle is going to be a Yamaha and, if they're still in business, I'll buy it from them even if I could get it a little cheaper in the city.

I'm Old School. It's called "Establishing A Rapport." It's very important in all aspects of life whether you're talking about somebody doing a couple thousand dollars worth of work on your motorcycle or it's the person bagging your groceries.

After a few decades wandering the Earth, you get a pretty good feel for who's legit with you and is going to treat you right and who's phony and unreliable. And, of course, sometimes you're still completely wrong. As long as you're more often right than wrong, it's all good..........

It seems like people have really either forgotten or dismissed the art of getting along with people for the mutual benefit of both parties involved. Of course, a "good rapport" doesn't guarantee a place will work on your 10-year-old motorcycle, but they at least might go to the trouble to explain to you why they won't.
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post #18 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 08:20 PM
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In an earlier life when I did this kind of work the problem surfaced when we were well into a “figure out / fix whatever it needs and discovered it needed a lot more. The customer at that point couldn’t understand how his $1,000 bike needed that much in repair. Then it was a battle to collect what was already invested. At that point everyone was unhappy.
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post #19 of 24 Unread 11-06-2019, 09:01 PM
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As a former dealer, now only an independent repair facility, I fully understand both sides of the issues of older bikes.

But too many owners loose sight of the fact that 3-4 months of payments on a 60 month new loan schedule would have repaired their older unit well enough for another 3-5 years of service (with reasonable maintenance).

I'll gladly work on a '87 KLR or a '73 Z1, as long as we agree on the value of services rendered.
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pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

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post #20 of 24 Unread Yesterday, 02:08 AM
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This must be a regional thing. I've never heard of that around here. There is enough competition locally that the dealers and the smaller shops all seem pretty happy to take in any work you want to bring in even if it isn't the brand they sell. The hourly rate is the same whether it is covered under warranty or by the owner.

Kev
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Last edited by VTWoodchuck; Yesterday at 02:17 AM.
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