Short in ignition circuit - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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post #1 of 14 Old 05-09-2020, 05:35 PM Thread Starter
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Short in ignition circuit

Hey All,
I was out for a ride the other day on my 2008, everything is going fine, bike was running great. After a stop, I go to start it and nothing. D.E.D. Main 20 amp fuse pops as soon as I turn the key. Got it home and started chasing wires hoping to find something chaffed, but no luck. The ground fault is solid, and is definitely in the ignition circuit.
Where do I go from here?
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post #2 of 14 Old 05-09-2020, 05:43 PM
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IME, the most common place for a short circuit is the wire bundle that gets trapped because of a tip-over/crash on the RH side. Bends the coolant reservoir bracket backwards & causes the wire bundle to rub on the forward facing seam of the fuel tank.

The rub thru is possibly in the Brown Wire which is the Main HOT wire After the ignition switch.

pdwestman
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post #3 of 14 Old 05-09-2020, 07:58 PM Thread Starter
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Haven't dumped her in a long time, so no damage over there. Checked every inch of wiring on the bike, found only one rub-spot which is unrelated. I have noticed one thing though: Should the white wire on that ignition harness be hot? (showing current) Is does so, even with the key off.
Another thought; Could it be the actual ignition/key assembly causing my grief?
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post #4 of 14 Old 05-09-2020, 08:47 PM
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White is constant + 12 VDC, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Brown is switched + 12 VDC.

Does the fuse blow only when the ignition is switched on? If so, a clue may be evident there (as in, short-circuit is in the switched + 12 VDC circuit).

A Generation 1 wiring diagram appears on this website, as well as throughout the 'Net.

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post #5 of 14 Old 05-09-2020, 08:51 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Damocles View Post
White is constant + 12 VDC, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Brown is switched + 12 VDC.

Does the fuse blow only when the ignition is switched on? If so, a clue may be evident there (as in, short-circuit is in the switched + 12 VDC circuit).

A Generation 1 wiring diagram appears on this website, as well as throughout the 'Net.
Yes. Blows instantly then the key is turned. The cover over the fuse actually glows!
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post #6 of 14 Old 05-10-2020, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Eldubya View Post
Yes. Blows instantly then the key is turned. The cover over the fuse actually glows!
Then, indications suggest you have a short-circuit, brown wire to ground, in your switched voltage circuit.

A multi-meter and wiring diagram are now your friends.
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“You better put down that gun. You got two ways to go, put it down or use it. Even if you tie me, you’re gonna be dead.” "John Russell" (Paul Newman), Hombre
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post #7 of 14 Old 05-13-2020, 07:06 PM
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If you have the schematic and a decent multi-meter, you should be able to chase down the short-circuit.

1) Temporarily remove the battery so you can use the ohm meter to try to locate the short
2) With the battery out and key in OFF position, connect ohm meter between batt leads
-With key OFF, meter should read open circuit (infinite ohms)
3) With key ON, see if meter now reads as short (zero or very low ohms)

If so, the proceed with isolation of some peripherals
4) Disconnect left handlebar switch ass (Hi/Low/Left/Right/Horn)
-Check to see if meter still reads as short

5) Disconnect right handlebar switch ass (Run/Start)
-Check to see if meter still reads as short

6) Disconnect igniter unit
-Check to see if meter still reads as short

7) Disconnect meters unit
-Check to see if meter still reads as short

8) Rear brake switch unit
-Check to see if meter still reads as short


Schematics can be hard to read for those KLR riders in the AARP program (speaking for a friend). So I took my magic eraser and removed some of the extra stuff to focus on the white feed wire to the IGN switch, then the brown distro wire that delivers switched +12v to the rest of the bikes circuits.

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post #8 of 14 Old 05-13-2020, 08:23 PM Thread Starter
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Awesome help from all you Gurus. Thank you!
I've taken it to someone hopefully smarter and more patient than me as I just don't have a lot of spare time these days, so we'll see how he gets along.
Thank you again.
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post #9 of 14 Old 05-14-2020, 12:52 PM
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Sir Foo - I just love your scientific method for electrical testing! Having a systematic methodology to eliminate the variables, one by one, makes it it seem fun (almost) to just test the circuits. Bonus points for the very AARP-friendly schematic diagram!

I hope that we hear how this turns out -I love a good mystery story, and I bet that there's a sneaky handlebar short hiding somewhere.
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post #10 of 14 Old 05-14-2020, 02:57 PM
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Secret sauce: 6 years as a tech in the USN. Schooling was pretty good, and included 5 weeks of coverage for the "6 Step Troubleshooting Methodology." We were over-trained and it mostly became a subconcious thought process -your brain would just know the answer, even if you had take a few minutes to be able to articulate what the little gray cells were doing automatically. Just fortunate to have that experience.

1. Symptom recognition. This is the action of recognizing some disorder or malfunction in electronic equipment.

2. Symptom elaboration. Obtaining a more detailed description of the trouble symptom is the purpose of this step.

3. Listing probable faulty functions. This step is applicable to equipment that contains more than one functional area or unit. From the information you have gathered, where could the trouble logically be located?

4. Localizing the faulty function. In this step you determine which of the functional units of the multi-unit equipment is actually at fault.

5. Localizing trouble to the circuit. You will do extensive testing in this step to isolate the trouble to a specific circuit.

6. Failure analysis. This step is multipart. Here you determine which part is faulty, repair/replace the part, determine what caused the failure, return the equipment to its proper operating status, and record the necessary information in a record-keeping book for other maintenance personnel in the future. While not a part of this step, the technician should reorder any parts used in repair of the faulty equipment.
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