Adventure Gear? - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
Bike and Rider Gear For discussions on different gear for the ride & rider.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 39 Old 10-05-2006, 09:49 AM Thread Starter
4th Gear
 
tomatocity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 2,453
Adventure Gear?

Looking at asome of the recent posts and digging my tent out of the garage to loan to friend made me wonder what specific gear do you travel with and what adjustments or additions do you make to your KLR for road (rain, mud, gravel, snow, etc.) conditions.

I have decided my 15 year old tent is way too big and heavy to adventure ride with. Cooking gear is an interest since I have larger camping gear. Clothing is another consideration since some of us live in warmer climates and don't have more than the basics for colder weather. Bags, fenders, racks, fork braces, tire pressures, pegs, lighting, GPS, computers, tools, tires (arrggghhh!), tubes, etc., are some motorcycle interests.

What are your thoughts and opinions? They are your thoughts and opinions so they CAN'T BE WRONG, though thoughts and opinions may vary.

Tim

2005 KLR 685
2015 Yamaha Super Tenere ES, 5/23/2015
2012 Yamaha Super Tenere; Purchased 7/30/2011; Sold 5/23/2015
tomatocity is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 39 Old 10-05-2006, 10:06 AM
r_w
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 6
for a small bike like a KLR, the key is good backpacking gear. It doesn't have to be the latest greatest, the insanely lightweight stuff may not survive the paintshaker of a KLR ride anyway. Focus on tent and bag to spend the money to get light and more important SMALL PACKING! I usually look at hunting-oriented places (Cabela's, Bass Pro, Gander Mt) for my camping gear because they tend to carry larger sizes of sleeping bags. I am still a fairly skinny guy but I am too big for 90% of the bags REI and the like sell.
r_w is offline  
post #3 of 39 Old 10-05-2006, 03:46 PM
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Colorado
Posts: 93
I focused on weight first, then tried to get things compact.

I took some local ride/camp outings as experiments. Don't even need to get far from home, but it does force you to make it real. It's a dress rehearseal of sorts. I found out that since most of the gear was on the back of the bike, the front tire was too light on the ground. Weight distribution is important. I added tank panniers for the sole purpose of moving weight forward (tools and extra bike supplies).

My second epiphany was realizing (after the second trip) that I didn't use 90% of the cooking gear that I brought. I have a "kitchen" in a waterproof, soft sided insulated bag (about the size of a 12-pack) that was WAY too much stuff. If I lived off that bike, maybe half of the gear might come in handy every rare now and then. As it was, it was just silly. I ended up recently just packing the small backpacking stove and compact cookware, and that was all. Some pasta, a can of soup. If civilization is nearby, you can travel without carrying much food/water. Um, I always carry some water, though.

Even some of the camping gear, although nice to have sometimes, was unnecessary. I go with a 2-person tent, but it's a good one. Light and compact. It has room for me and all the gear I want to get out of the rain, etc. Room to move around in the tent is nice. OTOH, those who camp with only a bivvy tent (really just a cover for their sleeping bag) certainly are traveling light. If mild weather can be depended upon, less shelter can be managed.

The best experience is your own. Our needs and comfort levels are different. Those few local ride/camp trips taught me a lot.

Life is a mortal adventure. Don't avoid all the risks.

2005 KLR650, ready for the world
1999 KLR650, badly in need of TLC...
1998 Honda Valkyrie Tourer
2001 DRZ400e, already broken... in
SgtMarty is offline  
 
post #4 of 39 Old 10-05-2006, 06:00 PM
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Posts: 96
On my multistate trip in May (TdT to Tennessee), I carried my 3-man camo dome tent. I had it and my folding camp chair strapped crosswise on the big self-made cargo rack - made a wider base for my huge gear bag. The gearbag is pretty well water-tight, and held my blanket roll, clothes and other grear. I use a twin-size inflatable mattress (with battery-powered pump) and twin-size quilted comforter. I'm bigger than the average bear, so most sleeping bags are too small. Even so, I had PLENTY of room! :wink:
Came in handy for those heavy mountain rain storms - all my gear was inside and dry - even survived a stout hail storm. Ask Max7.62 about tents and hailstorms . . . hehehe. :twisted:
I didn't use my stove, cookset or camp food - we ate at the campground pavillion or on the road.
This next trip, TdP, I'll go lighter on the camp cookery gear and food, heavier on cool-weather clothing. Same tent, mattress and blanket. That was comfy!
One point - carry some light-weight slip-on shoes. Otherwise you'll wear your heavy boots to the shower room, or tiptoe barefoot over gravel driveways - OUCH!! ops:

Ready to hit the road (Moi in Green):


The camp:


I'm about 330lbs, and I figure I was carrying about 60lbs of gear. Never a problem with the bike over 1080 miles, round trip.
Also, important lesson learned - put everything into ziploc bags. I found out which of my bags and pouches were water-proof - and most weren't!
Bigdog57 is offline  
post #5 of 39 Old 10-06-2006, 12:31 AM
2nd Gear
 
gunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Corning, NY
Posts: 280
Your right about going bare bones, the average solo biker/camper only needs the bare stuff, I have a multi-fuel camp stove I use thats maybe 5"x5" x5" and has a alum storage container I "could" use to cook in, it can burn either white gas or auto gas, but being a good former Marine, I can cook some pretty good chow in just a canteen cup, of course mountain house chow is the cats petutty, just heat the water and dump it in. Coffe gets made in the cup, instant of course, and decaf because the wife hates seeing me on caffiene ! :shock: I have a nice 4 season tent thats light and roomy in a sadistic sort of way, but I've woke up with 3 foot of snow on it and it hasn't collapsed on me yet from either snow or wind. I use a 3/4 thermarest self inflating pad, rolls up to about 6" x4" and with the chair kit, doubles life as my camp chair during the day/evening. Depending on the weather, I either use a USMC poncho/poncho liner and wool blanket for the warmer weather, or an old northface down bag for the cooler stuff. You can't forget the nylon hammock either, for those times you have trees and just want to flake out. For those that do plan on camping, just a few words of advice from a former Marine Corps survival instructor, when picking your tent, look for a few features, get one with a full fly, not one that just has a fly that covers the top of the tent, while they are cheap at wally world, nothing is worse than waking up because you touched the side of that tent during the rainstorm in the middle of the night and now all yur stuff is wet. Those tents will leak when wet if you touch them, unless of course you spend $600 + for a single wall expidition tent from one of the top line companies like Northface, pick one with a vestibule, that way you can scootch in, take yur boots off and not get wet or drag the nasty mud inside your tent., plus it gives you room to keep anything else you need, but don't need in the tent. And the cardinal rule, especially if you even THINK there may be bears around, NO FOOD IN THE TENT, I can't stress that enough, all a tent is to a hungry bear, is a bear sized twinky, and guess who is the creamy filling ..... Another point, not to scare the uninformed, but just remember this, more people are killed by black bears every year, than any other wildlife, and that includes grizzly bears. I do a lot of back country camping all year long, I travel up to algonquin park in ontario canada 3 or 4 times a year, even in the winter. Take twice as much water as you think you might need. You never know what might happen, investing in a water purifier is a good investment also, you can drop the hise in a muddy ditch or puddle and have a liter of drinking water in a couple minutes.

All in all the stuff isn't that big, takes up very little space and could save you from being a statistic, even in a temperate area like the north east or west. I would be glad to answer any survival type questions. My aim is to make sure everyone makes it back and has fun, which is what I tell the boy scouts I instruct every winter and spring.

2002 KLR 650
1978 RD 400 vintage racer
"I'm flat out like a lizard drinking"
Thanks Steve, you will be missed.
gunny is offline  
post #6 of 39 Old 10-06-2006, 10:35 AM
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 143
One of the best tips I have read for tripping and camping was in an article by motorcycle journalist, Peter Egan. He said a guy he rode with would save his old skivvies and clothes just for road trips. After wearing them for the day he would burn them or throw them away. It would be too cool to come home with a lighter load than what you left with.
ham! is offline  
post #7 of 39 Old 10-06-2006, 02:39 PM
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Tallahassee, Florida
Posts: 96
"Harley Huggies" . . . :twisted:
Bigdog57 is offline  
post #8 of 39 Old 10-08-2006, 09:13 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 331
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunny
Your right about going bare bones, the average solo biker/camper only needs the bare stuff, I have a multi-fuel camp stove I use thats maybe 5"x5" x5" and has a alum storage container I "could" use to cook in, it can burn either white gas or auto gas, but being a good former Marine, I can cook some pretty good chow in just a canteen cup, of course mountain house chow is the cats petutty, just heat the water and dump it in. Coffe gets made in the cup, instant of course, and decaf because the wife hates seeing me on caffiene ! :shock: I have a nice 4 season tent thats light and roomy in a sadistic sort of way, but I've woke up with 3 foot of snow on it and it hasn't collapsed on me yet from either snow or wind. I use a 3/4 thermarest self inflating pad, rolls up to about 6" x4" and with the chair kit, doubles life as my camp chair during the day/evening. Depending on the weather, I either use a USMC poncho/poncho liner and wool blanket for the warmer weather, or an old northface down bag for the cooler stuff. You can't forget the nylon hammock either, for those times you have trees and just want to flake out. For those that do plan on camping, just a few words of advice from a former Marine Corps survival instructor, when picking your tent, look for a few features, get one with a full fly, not one that just has a fly that covers the top of the tent, while they are cheap at wally world, nothing is worse than waking up because you touched the side of that tent during the rainstorm in the middle of the night and now all yur stuff is wet. Those tents will leak when wet if you touch them, unless of course you spend $600 + for a single wall expidition tent from one of the top line companies like Northface, pick one with a vestibule, that way you can scootch in, take yur boots off and not get wet or drag the nasty mud inside your tent., plus it gives you room to keep anything else you need, but don't need in the tent. And the cardinal rule, especially if you even THINK there may be bears around, NO FOOD IN THE TENT, I can't stress that enough, all a tent is to a hungry bear, is a bear sized twinky, and guess who is the creamy filling ..... Another point, not to scare the uninformed, but just remember this, more people are killed by black bears every year, than any other wildlife, and that includes grizzly bears. I do a lot of back country camping all year long, I travel up to algonquin park in ontario canada 3 or 4 times a year, even in the winter. Take twice as much water as you think you might need. You never know what might happen, investing in a water purifier is a good investment also, you can drop the hise in a muddy ditch or puddle and have a liter of drinking water in a couple minutes.

All in all the stuff isn't that big, takes up very little space and could save you from being a statistic, even in a temperate area like the north east or west. I would be glad to answer any survival type questions. My aim is to make sure everyone makes it back and has fun, which is what I tell the boy scouts I instruct every winter and spring.

KLRMike --are you out there dear----hubby --hey hubby--are reading this post about the bear stuff---DID YOU???? I have back up now- --you will back all this up -right gunny??? Heres my math-----KayLR=bear magnet-------KLRMike likes to make light of it :lol: KayLR thinks not so funny--glad you posted this. On another note when Mike and I took our 9 day trip in Aug. I use a revpak-waterprrof and still has a raincover too. I love it and it holds EVERYTHING-even has some pockets along the outside for quick availibility to water snacks-rain gear etc. I never know it's back there-I even had two folding chairs on the back across my larger rack.We have the little camp stove that folds up to the size of you fist-cool-we use all the cookware because what you don't cook in serves as extra bowls or food servers so we take the whole thing-it all fits inside each other and doesn't take that much room---I would definitely never get any without the no-stick coating inside-keeps things from burning as bad and clean up is a breeze-found ours at Cabelas-tea bags -packets of oatmeal and hot chocolate are great for trips,anything you just have to add hot water too-don't forget some extra clothsline to hang stuff up if it gets wet-theres always a couple of trees or one and your bike to tie off to. Ditto on the extra shoes or flip flops-tent fly and KEEPING THE FOOD OUTTA THE TENT. Kay
KayLR is offline  
post #9 of 39 Old 10-08-2006, 04:21 PM
2nd Gear
 
gunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Corning, NY
Posts: 280
Kaylr, the last time I was at Algonquin, in the course of 3 weeks I had 2 bears walk through my tent site, making me pull stakes and find an alternate campsite, which up there is fun because you get to most the campsites by canoe. That was the most I ever saw of bears in one trip. The thing most don't realize about bears, though the black bear is much more docile than a brown, they have a peculiar habit. Where as if your attacked by a brown {grizzly} it's generally because your percieved as a threat of some kind, and though they can, and do kill people, they tend to walk away once your no longer deemed a threat, a black bear on the other hand, will EAT you if it attacks you. I never go far in bear country without either my .44 mag or my 45/70, depending on where I'm at and what the law allows, I do always have a big can of bear spray regardless. Now don't let that scare you, in all my years, I've seen a grand total of only 6 bears while camping, and I tend to camp in some fairly remote areas of wilderness in Ontario and here in upstate NY. Just remember to hang your food away from your tent site, as well as cook away from your site.

Now, for those tightwads like me, if your looking for a great deal on top quality tents, without wanting to pay top dollar for a great tent, Eureka makes tents for several of the name brand companies. Every year, I believe the first Saturday in March, they have a clearance sale, and example of the sale, I bought a $450.00 tent for $110. It was made for the "jack wolfskin" company, one of the higher end companies. I'm not sure how many companies they make for, but I seem to recall they manufactuer for 5 or 6 different brand names. Mine was a second, the tag said it had a stain on the floor of the tent, I set the tent up and it took me over an hour to find this "stain" it was at a corner, maybe an inch in diameter and very, very light, had the sun not highlighted it, I never would have seen it. A good quality tent will seem like a hotel room {in a sadistic way } you will hardly notice wind and rain or snow falling. Get what you can afford and have fun with it.

2002 KLR 650
1978 RD 400 vintage racer
"I'm flat out like a lizard drinking"
Thanks Steve, you will be missed.
gunny is offline  
post #10 of 39 Old 10-09-2006, 04:25 PM
1st Gear
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: denver, co
Posts: 42
Send a message via Yahoo to Kawioops
Quote:
Originally Posted by SgtMarty
I focused on weight first, then tried to get things compact.

I took some local ride/camp outings as experiments. Don't even need to get far from home, but it does force you to make it real. It's a dress rehearseal of sorts. I found out that since most of the gear was on the back of the bike, the front tire was too light on the ground. Weight distribution is important. I added tank panniers for the sole purpose of moving weight forward (tools and extra bike supplies).

My second epiphany was realizing (after the second trip) that I didn't use 90% of the cooking gear that I brought. I have a "kitchen" in a waterproof, soft sided insulated bag (about the size of a 12-pack) that was WAY too much stuff. If I lived off that bike, maybe half of the gear might come in handy every rare now and then. As it was, it was just silly. I ended up recently just packing the small backpacking stove and compact cookware, and that was all. Some pasta, a can of soup. If civilization is nearby, you can travel without carrying much food/water. Um, I always carry some water, though.

Even some of the camping gear, although nice to have sometimes, was unnecessary. I go with a 2-person tent, but it's a good one. Light and compact. It has room for me and all the gear I want to get out of the rain, etc. Room to move around in the tent is nice. OTOH, those who camp with only a bivvy tent (really just a cover for their sleeping bag) certainly are traveling light. If mild weather can be depended upon, less shelter can be managed.

The best experience is your own. Our needs and comfort levels are different. Those few local ride/camp trips taught me a lot.
O.K., now keep in mind that in this case your dealing with a man who carries everything but the kitchen sink, and it wouldn't have surprised me to see that! When I camped with Marty and Hayduke and our British cousin, Mark, Marty had more stuff than I would have dreamed about. How he gets it all on the machine, I just don't understand. :lol:

I AM Wonko the Sane!
Kawioops is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My BC Adventure - Not for Bandwidth Impaired klr4evr Western Canada 10 08-30-2012 10:24 PM
TN Plateau/Valley Adventure cherokee_chuck Travel Log & Trip Reports 0 07-08-2008 09:10 AM
A Really Bad Idea (or maybe a really fun Adventure!!!) KLRless KLR & Other Motorcycle Related Discussion 5 12-25-2006 02:43 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome