Hydration Packs - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 06-27-2015, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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Hydration Packs

Just curious how many people ride with hydration packs? I'm a little behind the times as usual (lol, like 10 years!) but I just recently picked one up for riding. Loving it so far other than it's a little clumsy to get on with my big jacket.

I had looked at the CamelBaks a few years ago, but they were super pricey and I didn't bother picking one up. On my KLR I would just throw a bottle of water in the trunk and go. Since I picked up the WR250R and it has zero cargo capacity, I figured I would have another look at the hydration packs. Found a Teton Trailrider 2 on Amazon for like $30 CDN. I was out for an hour or two yesterday and I managed to chug over a liter of water.

So far I'm just emptying the bladder out and then throwing it in the deep freeze to keep nasty stuff from growing in it. I tried drying it out once, but that seems nearly impossible. Any other tips and tricks for a newb to hydration packs?

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post #2 of 19 Old 06-29-2015, 10:35 AM
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I don't use one when I ride. Like you, on the KLR, I carry a bottle of water in my bag. I stop often enough that I can drink.
But I do use a hydration bladder when I hike and go backpacking. At one time I had a Camelbak. Good quality and fairly indestructible. I did manage to ruin it (don't ask). Now I use an army surplus bladder.
There are cleaning kits available. These include a brush for the bladder, a long skinny brush for the tube and a drying rack. Camelbak sells a cleaning kit. But I found a generic kit at Walmart for a much cheaper price.
After day hikes I usually clean it after every use. On backpacking trips I have gone up to 6 days without cleaning. As long as the water is purified, I have not had a problem.
I clean it with soap and water, using the brushes. After the backpacking trips, or if it sets for a while, after I clean it with soap & water I fill it with a bleach & water solution. I let this soak for about an hour to kill any bugs that may be left inside. Camelbak sells packets of a water soluble antimicrobial that may be a little less harsh than bleach.
The drying rack folds, slips inside the bladder then unfolds. This helps let the air circulate and dry the inside. I remove the bite valve, hang it up and let everything air dry.
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post #3 of 19 Old 06-29-2015, 12:57 PM Thread Starter
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Good tips, thank you . I'll have to keep my eyes peeled for one of those drying racks at Wal-Mart, I tried just propping it open once but it didn't seem to dry. I think the rack would make a big difference.


Bladders seem fairly durable as well, I took a tumble in the sand dunes and pretty much landed on the pack but it was fine. Lol, could have been the sand that saved it though, soft landing.

Still a lot easier drinking out of a bottle though. Especially when you forget to open the valve!

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post #4 of 19 Old 06-29-2015, 04:46 PM
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Without my hydration backpack, don't know if I could have made it through the highway-turned-into-a-parking-lot connecting Sevierville, Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg, TN, one late afternoon last summer!

High-90's F. temperature, blazing sun, and bumper-to-bumper traffic moving slower than a man can walk. The garish "attractions" locally had just dismissed the thousands of young tourists and their parents who frequent that entertainment industry, and I was caught up in that quagmire.

No chance to reach for a water bottle; pulling off the highway meant questionably getting back on. All in the heat of eastern Tennessee; humidity supplied perhaps by the TVA lakes.

Hydration helps prevent heat stroke. The ability to take a drink at any time can be important, in a situation like that; actually, sound health any time, especially in hot ambient temperature.

My bladder-and-pack at the time was the lowest-cost one on Target's shelves; worked fine; have had to replace the bite valve once (REI has the part). Turned ON by the user biting the valve at the hose tip.

Since, have obtained a jacket with a built-in bladder pouch and hose hole (Joe Rocket Ballastic Adventure).

That said, that's one way to stay hydrated (bladder pack). Not the only way. For health's sake, good idea to find one; hydration pack is convenient and practical when riding, in my experience.

And, oh. You're supposed to CLEAN these things?
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post #5 of 19 Old 07-03-2015, 04:47 PM
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I have a Camelback, holds two liters. I throw in an electrolyte/flavor tablet with each fill.
Like Damocles, I could not imagine going through Moab,UT in June without it. I like the pockets mine has...I keep the tablets and my...protective device in them.

~Things work out best for those that make the best of the way things work out~
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post #6 of 19 Old 07-04-2015, 11:46 AM
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Wow I feel inadequate, I guess Im not intense enough.
Heres mine

DSC_0700 1_zpshnsbwols.jpg Photo by altitude5 | Photobucket
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post #7 of 19 Old 07-04-2015, 03:02 PM
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JF, may I call you that?, what you can do with a restoration is....incredible!
Thanks for sharing the pics. !!

~Things work out best for those that make the best of the way things work out~
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post #8 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 09:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masterlink View Post
JF, may I call you that?, what you can do with a restoration is....incredible!
Thanks for sharing the pics. !!
Thanks ML
I like when others appreciate quality work, you should see what I did for a
clock.

BTW to stay on topic I dont use a hydratation pack while riding my KLR because its not the kind of motorcycle one would use to race or not need to stop for a drink from a bottle stashed in a tank bag or top case. But I suppose its fun to pretend one is riding a more nimble,lighter,more extreme motorcycle once in a while.
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post #9 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepflambe View Post
BTW to stay on topic I dont use a hydratation pack while riding my KLR because its not the kind of motorcycle one would use to race or not need to stop for a drink from a bottle stashed in a tank bag or top case.
Nothing mandates a hydration pack, Jeepflabe! You're certainly entitled to your choice of hydration technique.

I find a hydration pack convenient; the hose is accessible to any headgear (no need to remove helmet to take a drink), and . . . no need to stop and grab for a water bottle (as in, open tank bag or top case), unscrew cap, replace cap, and stow bottle. Easier and simpler to simply turn one's head and bite the valve, moving or stopped, on or off the bike.

Further, the accessibility of the hose encourages hydration, promoting hot weather health. Yes, hydration can be accomplished other ways, and if you choose them, use them freely in good health.

My hydration pack (or my recently-acquired Joe Rocket Adventure Ballistic Jacket with its built-in pocket and hose hole) somehow did not come with the grandiose Walter Mitty-like fantasies you suggest. Only the concept of imminent access to water. Yet, I think our Armed Forces now have hydration packs as standard issue field equipment, regardless of duty assignment.

Again, my experience (weather somewhat warmer at lower latitudes than Canada's) and preference only; you're certainly welcome to yours.
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post #10 of 19 Old 07-05-2015, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeepflambe View Post
Thanks ML
I like when others appreciate quality work, you should see what I did for a
clock.

BTW to stay on topic I dont use a hydratation pack while riding my KLR because its not the kind of motorcycle one would use to race or not need to stop for a drink from a bottle stashed in a tank bag or top case. But I suppose its fun to pretend one is riding a more nimble,lighter,more extreme motorcycle once in a while.
Yup, when I'm on the KLR and I know I'm going to be out for a bit I just throw a bottle of water in the trunk. I bought my pack for the WR250R though, it's got nothing for cargo, no rack, or tank bag, nothing... Kinda handy as well, the pack has a mesh pocket that I can stash a snack or two in to keep my fat levels up.

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