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-   -   Amateur Riders (https://www.klrforum.com/how-tos-tech-guides/8483-amateur-riders.html)

johnk8080 04-05-2010 07:06 AM

Amateur Riders
 
If you are like me, either you have been off a bike for a long time or have very little riding experience. I thought it might be a good idea for some of the experienced riders to give advice on what to do and what not to do in certain situations, weather it be on the road or off. There are so many times an outcome could have been much different if you just knew what to do in a particular situation. For example, we all love our motorcycles and some times have a hard time "letting go" of them, and I mean that literally. If you are losing control, when do you "let go" and separate from the bike. Many times, holding on too long will create a much worse situation. The bike can be repaired, so can you but obviously it hurts a lot more.

Lockjaw 04-05-2010 09:42 AM

I am no expert, but I'll throw this out there. Target fixation is super dangerous. It happened to me bad once. I was tired. In a turn, stared at the curb like a fool, all of a sudden I was headed off the road. Corrected and no issues. My bro in law was telling me yesterday about a buddy of his who rode OFF the Bay Bridge. Landed on a car. Broken pelvis among other things. I don't know him, but first thing I thought: target fixation. You hit where you look. Scan, don't lock.




DantesDame 04-05-2010 05:01 PM

There's a lot to list!

- (pavement) always trust your tires. Lean into the turn as much as you can
- (pavement) you can stop faster than you think with your brakes - practice!
- (dirt) the throttle can get you out of a heap of trouble. Deep sand, gravel...when in doubt, gas it!
- (always) look ahead. Be aware of your surroundings and anticipate problems

Paper 04-05-2010 05:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DantesDame (Post 60075)
There's a lot to list!

- (pavement) always trust your tires. Lean into the turn as much as you can
- (pavement) you can stop faster than you think with your brakes - practice!
- (dirt) the throttle can get you out of a heap of trouble. Deep sand, gravel...when in doubt, gas it!
- (always) look ahead. Be aware of your surroundings and anticipate problems

Excellent!!
The first two are very, very important!! You will be AMAZED at how far you can take the bike over without loosing control.. I have drug the pegs on my KLR!!
And grab that front brake for all it's worth!! Don't slam it, but squeeze.. What you want is weight transfer to the front tire, which will greatly assist in the tire's bite on the road!!!

But, first and foremost, my suggestion for all new, or returning riders is to take the MSF Experienced Rider Course as soon as you can!! If you have trouble finding a course location, call your local Harley dealership and ask when they're holding one.. :confused: Most Harley shops have the course once or more a month and the price isn't bad.. And usually it'll get you a 10-20% break on your bike insurance, too!!

And just think about how fun it is running circles around Harley riders on your KLR!! :D

I've been legally road riding for (gulp) 29 years.. I've ridden track days in the US and Canada. I ride aggressively and typically put 15-20,000 miles a year on motorcycles, and I still take the ERC course once every 4-5 years as a refresher..

Take the course.. I'll save you money on insurance, and could save your life..:)

BIGIRON 04-05-2010 05:28 PM

Strongly agree with Paper. Matter of fact, it wouldn't hurt to take the MSF Basic course. You'll learn some good stuff, but it also helps you unlearn some bad stuff.

johnk8080 04-05-2010 06:01 PM

That is where I have trouble, drawing the line on weather I can recover or I have just lost it. Every situation is different of course, so it is a split second decision on weather you can recover or it is lost. Once you decide to let go, here comes trouble, but if you hang on too long, it can be way worse. Young or inexperienced riders tend to hang on way too long and take the brunt when they could have easily let go and walked away.

NoBull 04-05-2010 06:40 PM

John I recently bought a DVD Dual Sport Riding Techniques, I am very impressed with the content very well made. I strongly suggest going to a parking lot somewhere and get to know your bike. Practice panic stops, practice shifting your weight and tight circles. Knowing how your bike will act during stops will help alot if and when you need to use those skills.

Lockjaw 04-05-2010 07:02 PM

Paper and BIGIRON are giving you good advice.




CheapBassTurd 04-06-2010 11:58 AM

Excellent advice totally so far and I agree with all of it.

I ride thru every potential mess. When ya jump off you are guaranteed to wreck.

johnk8080 04-06-2010 01:05 PM

I think that's just it, more practice and getting to know the capabilities of the bike. I went off road and it is very squirrely, not like the old YZ 125 I rode years ago. I knew the KLR would not be the same but I need to learn what it is capable of, especially turning. It feels like the front end is always going to wash out. The weight of this bike and me for that matter is way more than anything I did years ago. Just sticking my leg out is not enough to stay up.


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