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post #1 of 22 Old 01-24-2012, 03:39 PM Thread Starter
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See me now?

How do you make oncoming traffic aware of your presence?

I ride with my brights on at all times, flashing it when nearing someone in the left turn lane; wear a bright red helmet with a busy black and white pattern, have an American flag mounted to the back of my vehicle; and wear a orange hunting vest over my jacket.

What do you do?
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post #2 of 22 Old 01-24-2012, 05:34 PM
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I installed a modulator for the headlight. It flashes it several times per second.
I never recommend flashing the brites at anyone because that can sometimes be misconstrued as meaning "come on out".
A couple of other things you can do is adjust your lane position to be seen better. Use the whole lane and ride where you can be seen. Dont tailgate, if you are riding right behind the car in front of you, you are effectively "hiding" right behind the car in front of you. Swing back and forth from the left side of your lane to the right side, back to the left, repeat as needed, because human visual accuity doesnt pick up movement coming straight on as well as movement side to side, so if you are riding straight at another vehicle you stand a better chance of being seen if you have some side to side movement.
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post #3 of 22 Old 01-24-2012, 07:43 PM
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I stand on the pegs and act like an aggressive rider. In the end I watch other drivers as if they still can't see me. I am right more than I am wrong when I assume they can't or don't see me.

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post #4 of 22 Old 01-24-2012, 11:08 PM
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Get a vest with flashing LED's.




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

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Soon, we ride.

AKA JD Mader or you can call me "Dan" just not early for dinner.

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post #5 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 12:08 AM
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There's lots of things people have tried. I've tried bright yellow bikes, flashing headlights, wearing white helmets (statistically less likely to be involved in a crash than any other color) covered in reflective stickers, wearing bright yellow leathers, weaving the bike around in my lane, standing up, sitting down, riding a lone, riding in a pack, you name it.

Nothing will make an oblivious driver see you. You could be riding a hunter-orange bike, wearing yellow and red reflective stripes over your whole body with flashing lights, sirens, and have a sparkly unicorn riding pillion and people will still pull out in front of you or change lanes into you.
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post #6 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 12:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRoadRider View Post
There's lots of things people have tried. I've tried bright yellow bikes, flashing headlights, wearing white helmets (statistically less likely to be involved in a crash than any other color) covered in reflective stickers, wearing bright yellow leathers, weaving the bike around in my lane, standing up, sitting down, riding a lone, riding in a pack, you name it.

Nothing will make an oblivious driver see you. You could be riding a hunter-orange bike, wearing yellow and red reflective stripes over your whole body with flashing lights, sirens, and have a sparkly unicorn riding pillion and people will still pull out in front of you or change lanes into you.
Good point




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

PPMC #1.
Soon, we ride.

AKA JD Mader or you can call me "Dan" just not early for dinner.

Click my handle for a link to my homepage/blog...which has nothing to do with MCs. Free literature and music! Viva La Revolucion!
-------------------
2008 KLR 650
RIP DM - Soon, we ride.
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post #7 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 05:22 AM
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Something to remember about most of the shiny, sparkly, orange and yellow gear, most of it isnt really visable from the front. When you are riding straight at someone, the bike, handlebars, fairing, windshield, headlight, ect, blocks any view of a reflective vest or jacket and your helmet is mostly open to the front so it doesnt really matter what color it is. We all look like a tall thin dark spot on the road with a headlight in the center.
That said, statistics do show that people who wear light or reflective gear have fewer accidents. Something the statistics dont really show is, are those people having fewer accidents because they wear reflective gear or is it because people who wear reflective gear tend to ride more safely.
Anyway, Im sure the conspicuous gear does help some but I wouldnt count on it, especially from the front where alot of it cant really be clearly seen.
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post #8 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRoadRider View Post
Nothing will make an oblivious driver see you. You could be riding a hunter-orange bike, wearing yellow and red reflective stripes over your whole body with flashing lights, sirens, and have a sparkly unicorn riding pillion and people will still pull out in front of you or change lanes into you.
YOU THINK?

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post #9 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XRoadRider View Post
There's lots of things people have tried. I've tried bright yellow bikes, flashing headlights, wearing white helmets (statistically less likely to be involved in a crash than any other color) covered in reflective stickers, wearing bright yellow leathers, weaving the bike around in my lane, standing up, sitting down, riding a lone, riding in a pack, you name it.

Nothing will make an oblivious driver see you. You could be riding a hunter-orange bike, wearing yellow and red reflective stripes over your whole body with flashing lights, sirens, and have a sparkly unicorn riding pillion and people will still pull out in front of you or change lanes into you.
I was driving a 25 ton fire truck, painted bright red, with about $50,000 worth of flashing, spinning lights, had a device that turned all the traffic light except for mine red, and a police officer in the intersection stopping traffic and still had someone pull out in from of me......

When I'm on the bike I wear a high-vis yellow jacket and a silver helmet. I also ride like no one else can see and they are making a phone call AND they all want to kill me.....

The best safety device you have is you...expect everyone else on the road to do the dumbest thing they can and be ready to react to it.
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post #10 of 22 Old 01-25-2012, 08:48 AM
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I don't ride in fear, but I just automatically presume any oncoming car could turn in front of me at any time, either with or without signalling. It could be at an intersection, or anywhere else like a driveway or entrance to a parking lot where somebody suddenly realizes they need to turn in and do so abruptly or without signalling. They might be trying to beat the car behind you without even realizing you're there.

I certainly have nothing against hi-viz gear. I wear one of those fluorescent construction workers' vests when I ride at night, but not in the daytime. When wearing hi-viz gear, I think it's important to remember not to have a false sense of security and think, "I've got all this on: they've GOT to see me."

Always presume they're going to abruptly turn in front of you and have the best avoidance strategy you can come up with if they do.

I actually worry more about cars behind me because they're a lot harder to keep track of in the mirrors. They're harder to see and it's much harder to judge how fast they're coming up on you.

When I come up to a light at a busy intersection, if I can see I'm going to be the first person waiting at the light, I'll try to slow and get in another lane where there's a car ahead of me. I always stay in first and go ahead and turn my front wheel to whatever side seems best and keep me eyes on the mirrors.

That way, if I see a car coming up behind me that's not going to stop, my front wheel's already turned and if worst comes to worst and time is critical, I can just dump the clutch and either go between the cars ahead of me, or just jump the curb if I'm in the outside lane.

I figure I'd rather get between the two cars ahead of me for a little protection. If you're the first person at the light and somebody's going to hit you from behind, the only place to go is forward and that's going to be right into the crossing traffic where you don't stand much of a chance unless you get really lucky.

Of course, with this technique, you run the risk of being smashed between the car behind you and the car in front of you, but this would be dependent on whether or not you saw the car approaching from the rear. If you don't see it at all and you're the first vehicle stopped at the light, you're still going to first be hit from behind, and then pushed out into the crossing traffic and most likely be hit again or run over after you're off the bike.

It's hard to beat the old saying, "Ride Like You're Invisible."




Last edited by planalp; 01-25-2012 at 08:51 AM.
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