Why you should do your own work (again) - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 11-30-2016, 06:47 PM Thread Starter
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Why you should do your own work (again)

So normally I do my own servicing and minor work, but a change of living arrangements meant I didn't do the last service or this one. Enter the issue:

I took my bike to the shop this morning to get a new set of tyres fitted and a bigger service, including stuff I couldn't do myself. While enjoying a coffee in town they rang me to say that the metal sleeve inside the oil filter was missing! It appears that the (different) mob that did the last service must have neglected to put it back and thrown it out with the old filter! Grrrrrr.

Ive been riding around for a few thou k's without it. Also I am now I am without a bike today or a means to get home as they wait for the part to come in tomorrow to fit it.

On the plus side, at least this workshop is on the ball. #rantover
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post #2 of 9 Old 11-30-2016, 07:36 PM
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tas,
I would tell them to put it Together! Without an oil filter in the cavity! Put the oil filter in your pocket or luggage and ride your bike Home! It has survived 2000-5000km with-out an oil filter so far, yes?

All you have to do is lay the bike on its left hand side next week, in their parking lot or service bay and Install the NEW bypass pipe and oil filter. Ya' won't hardly lose a drop of oil!
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pdwestman
Modify at "YOUR OWN RISK"!

Still riding my 1987 KL650-A1. 84,000+ miles & counting
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post #3 of 9 Old 11-30-2016, 08:25 PM Thread Starter
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That thought did cross my mind!

They said they would do that for me (and make me sign a waiver) so I could ride it home, but I can survive without the bike as I'm off work for the rest of the week anyway.
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post #4 of 9 Old 12-01-2016, 12:52 AM
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No great harm likely, riding without the oil tube/bypass valve with reasonably recent oil change.

Honda manufactured jillions of small engines without replaceable oil filters, depending upon reasonable oil change intervals to keep engines safe.

Jettisoning the oil tube/bypass valve along with a used oil filter on a KLR isn't uncommon; an intuitive act by some who discard automobile oil filter cartridges similarly . . .
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-01-2016, 10:16 AM
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Paul and Damocles covered it; no harm done and as pointed out there are a ton of motorcycle engines that don't even use a filter. not the end of the world IMO.

.....and as mentioned, this is a common mistake.....in fact, here it is on my list of "Common New KLR Owner Mistakes", note #6! ;-)


1) Oil drain plug overtightening: it is relatively common for people to overtighten the oil drain plug.....usually to stop a leak after the gasket/washer has inadvertently fallen into the used oil or left stuck to the bottom of the engine! best case is stripped threads, worst is a cracked case. Make sure the washer is in place and use a torque wrench Note; my manual says 17 ft lbs, Eaglemike recommends 15 ft lbs with his low profile drain plug which is what I use. Some Gen2 manuals specify 21 ft lbs but there has been no change in the plug or case which would affect the drain plug torque and people have stripped their drain plugs at this setting: beware!

- 2) Chain tension: many owners and some shops overtighten the KLR's drive chain; due to the long travel suspension and geometry the KLR needs more slack than other bikes people may be used to. If the chain is too tight you risk damaging the countershaft seal and bearing as well as possibly the wheel bearings along with premature wear of the drive chain and sprockets. Quick check; with the bike on the sidestand, you should be able to touch the chain to the bottom rearmost portion of the chain slipper but not the metal swingarm itself.

- 3) Speedo drive: it is common for people to post problems with their speedo after they've had the front wheel off. If you don't make sure the drive slots in the hub are aligned with the speedo drive tangs you risk bending the drive tangs and worse, breaking the hub. Time consuming to repair, expensive to replace, easy to avoid!

- 4) Oil Level: the factory KLR oil level sight glass is arguably too low....additionally some KLR's burn oil at various rates so it is imperative that the oil level is constantly checked. Luckily the sight glass makes this very easy to do. My suggestion is to keep the oil level at the very top of the sight glass with the bike level and to check it before every ride and at every fuel stop. The first failure from low oil levels is likely to be the cam bores in the head......and used KLR heads are getting difficult to find and are expensive. Keep an eye on that oil level!

- 5) Overtightening of other fasteners; similar to the oil drain plug there are a few other fasteners that cause significant problems if overtightened; the valve cover bolts are one such fastener - the manual calls up 69 inch lbs (NOT ft. lbs!) but Eaglemike suggests 55 in lbs which is a safer value. Another problem fastener is the footpeg mounting bolts; the factory nuts welded in the frame box are very thin with only 3 or 4 threads catching......these often strip out necessitating a repair. To avoid the problem, consider not using accessories that bolt to the bike using these bolts (i.e. centerstands) and torque them properly. I've heard that some manuals show 45NM (33 ft lbs) and some versions show 25 Nm (18 ft lbs)......I will suggest that the 33 ft lbs is a mistake and too much; I go with the 18 to avoid stripping the nuts and because this value falls in line with the recommended torque for generic 8mm fasteners in the manual. Safety wiring the bolt heads is also a wise precaution as loose bolts take the threads out quickly.

- 6) Throwing away the tube when changing the oil filter. People often mistakenly toss the metal tube that is inserted in the oil filter when they throw the old filter in the trash....make sure it's there and put it back in the right way.

- 7) attempting a counterbalance lever (doohickey) adjusting bolt adjustment without first ensuring the lever and spring are both intact and the spring has tension. Failure to do so can introduce a catastrophic amount of play into the counterbalance chain system.

-8) Not checking fasteners for proper torque at least at every oil change. Especially foot pegs and sub-frame bolts. The fasteners that Kawasaki put in place are adequate, but once torque falls below spec vibration can loosen the fastener. A loose fastener will quickly fail if it is under load.

cheers,
Dave
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post #6 of 9 Old 12-01-2016, 08:41 PM
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#7 counterbalance Lever question

Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Paul and Damocles covered it; no harm done and as pointed out there are a ton of motorcycle engines that don't even use a filter. not the end of the world IMO.

.....and as mentioned, this is a common mistake.....in fact, here it is on my list of "Common New KLR Owner Mistakes", note #6! ;-)


1) Oil drain plug overtightening: it is relatively common for people to overtighten the oil drain plug.....usually to stop a leak after the gasket/washer has inadvertently fallen into the used oil or left stuck to the bottom of the engine! best case is stripped threads, worst is a cracked case. Make sure the washer is in place and use a torque wrench Note; my manual says 17 ft lbs, Eaglemike recommends 15 ft lbs with his low profile drain plug which is what I use. Some Gen2 manuals specify 21 ft lbs but there has been no change in the plug or case which would affect the drain plug torque and people have stripped their drain plugs at this setting: beware!

- 2) Chain tension: many owners and some shops overtighten the KLR's drive chain; due to the long travel suspension and geometry the KLR needs more slack than other bikes people may be used to. If the chain is too tight you risk damaging the countershaft seal and bearing as well as possibly the wheel bearings along with premature wear of the drive chain and sprockets. Quick check; with the bike on the sidestand, you should be able to touch the chain to the bottom rearmost portion of the chain slipper but not the metal swingarm itself.

- 3) Speedo drive: it is common for people to post problems with their speedo after they've had the front wheel off. If you don't make sure the drive slots in the hub are aligned with the speedo drive tangs you risk bending the drive tangs and worse, breaking the hub. Time consuming to repair, expensive to replace, easy to avoid!

- 4) Oil Level: the factory KLR oil level sight glass is arguably too low....additionally some KLR's burn oil at various rates so it is imperative that the oil level is constantly checked. Luckily the sight glass makes this very easy to do. My suggestion is to keep the oil level at the very top of the sight glass with the bike level and to check it before every ride and at every fuel stop. The first failure from low oil levels is likely to be the cam bores in the head......and used KLR heads are getting difficult to find and are expensive. Keep an eye on that oil level!

- 5) Overtightening of other fasteners; similar to the oil drain plug there are a few other fasteners that cause significant problems if overtightened; the valve cover bolts are one such fastener - the manual calls up 69 inch lbs (NOT ft. lbs!) but Eaglemike suggests 55 in lbs which is a safer value. Another problem fastener is the footpeg mounting bolts; the factory nuts welded in the frame box are very thin with only 3 or 4 threads catching......these often strip out necessitating a repair. To avoid the problem, consider not using accessories that bolt to the bike using these bolts (i.e. centerstands) and torque them properly. I've heard that some manuals show 45NM (33 ft lbs) and some versions show 25 Nm (18 ft lbs)......I will suggest that the 33 ft lbs is a mistake and too much; I go with the 18 to avoid stripping the nuts and because this value falls in line with the recommended torque for generic 8mm fasteners in the manual. Safety wiring the bolt heads is also a wise precaution as loose bolts take the threads out quickly.

- 6) Throwing away the tube when changing the oil filter. People often mistakenly toss the metal tube that is inserted in the oil filter when they throw the old filter in the trash....make sure it's there and put it back in the right way.

- 7) attempting a counterbalance lever (doohickey) adjusting bolt adjustment without first ensuring the lever and spring are both intact and the spring has tension. Failure to do so can introduce a catastrophic amount of play into the counterbalance chain system.

-8) Not checking fasteners for proper torque at least at every oil change. Especially foot pegs and sub-frame bolts. The fasteners that Kawasaki put in place are adequate, but once torque falls below spec vibration can loosen the fastener. A loose fastener will quickly fail if it is under load.

cheers,
Dave
As this adjustment is done frequently, just how would you do the inspection without opening up the engine? Seems like a lot of trouble to go through to make a minor adjustment.

Ageing Gracefully



2017 Yamaha XT250
1990 Honda NX250 (Green/White)
2011 Kawasaki KLR 650 (Orange & White )

My KLR Page..http://www.powers31.info/2011_KLR650.htm

Mod's to KLR:
Power socket, L.E.D. Battery Indicator, Camera bag holder
Custom Saddlebag frames .
Louder horns, Firstgear Onyx tail bag.
Custom Aluminum Skid Plate.
Cut down seat with Custom pad.
Go Pro Camera mount.
Doo-Hicky
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post #7 of 9 Old 12-02-2016, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by larry31 View Post
As this adjustment is done frequently, just how would you do the inspection without opening up the engine? Seems like a lot of trouble to go through to make a minor adjustment.
You have to open up the engine to determine the integrity of the lever and that the spring has tension. This doesn't necessarily have to be done every time and if you use Eaglemike's lever and torsion spring, it never needs to be done again.....which is why most of us have gone that route. If you have never checked it, I highly recommend doing so before attempting the adjustment, particularly on a Gen1.

Cheers,
Dave
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post #8 of 9 Old 12-02-2016, 07:41 PM
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#7 ?????

Thanks Dave.
I did do my Doo with EM's torsion spring, and lever. I thought it seemed as you just confirmed. I just wanted to make sure it didn't need to be done that often. I can see why it should be checked if you bought a used bike with no previous history.

Thanks for clarification.
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Ageing Gracefully



2017 Yamaha XT250
1990 Honda NX250 (Green/White)
2011 Kawasaki KLR 650 (Orange & White )

My KLR Page..http://www.powers31.info/2011_KLR650.htm

Mod's to KLR:
Power socket, L.E.D. Battery Indicator, Camera bag holder
Custom Saddlebag frames .
Louder horns, Firstgear Onyx tail bag.
Custom Aluminum Skid Plate.
Cut down seat with Custom pad.
Go Pro Camera mount.
Doo-Hicky
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post #9 of 9 Old 12-03-2016, 10:26 AM
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I'll add some language to clarify that for next time. thanks. :-)

Cheers,
Dave
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