New to motorcycles, but KLR fits the bid - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 4 Old 04-13-2009, 09:36 PM Thread Starter
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New to motorcycles, but KLR fits the bid

Here's the deal, I'm a college student so funds are limited, but I don't have a car. I've always thought a motorcycle would fit the bid because of the gas mileage and the fact that it is cheaper. I race bikes so I would transport a bike with the motorcycle, I've seen trailers that I could fit a bike on. I also kayak and I used to see a kayaker haul his boat behind his motorcycle. I guess what I'm asking is would the KLR be a good choice? I'm about 5'11 and 170lbs. I would mainly drive to races and go home on the weekends. I don't want a big cruiser or a crotch-rocket and I would travel on fire roads to get to some races or rivers. My father who used to race motor-cross mentioned this bike. I'm new to motorcycles, but I need some transportation. Any help is greatly appreciated?

James H
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post #2 of 4 Old 04-14-2009, 10:45 AM
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Having a bicycling background will help, but if you are new to MC's, I would not recommend pulling a trailer until you are way more comfortable.

Lot's of people selling cars right now. Just my .02. No offense.




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

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post #3 of 4 Old 04-14-2009, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by jamesh View Post
Here's the deal, I'm a college student so funds are limited, but I don't have a car. I've always thought a motorcycle would fit the bid because of the gas mileage and the fact that it is cheaper. I race bikes so I would transport a bike with the motorcycle, I've seen trailers that I could fit a bike on. I also kayak and I used to see a kayaker haul his boat behind his motorcycle. I guess what I'm asking is would the KLR be a good choice? I'm about 5'11 and 170lbs. I would mainly drive to races and go home on the weekends. I don't want a big cruiser or a crotch-rocket and I would travel on fire roads to get to some races or rivers. My father who used to race motor-cross mentioned this bike. I'm new to motorcycles, but I need some transportation. Any help is greatly appreciated?

James H
James,

You're spot on!

I am a student, again, due to the economy. Although I have a vehicle, it sits. I can use much less in gas commuting with my KLR. It cost me about $10 bucks (sometimes less, sometimes more) to fill up. In comparison, it would take my older and small little TOYota pickup about $25 bucks to fill up every week. $15 savings x 52 weeks = some nice cash for a student! ($780).

Remember, you are better off saving a dollar than earning a dollar. A dollar saved = $1.00 in your pocket. Earning a dollar = $0.55 +-... GOT TO LOVE THOSE TAXES! I wonder when WE are going to pay 100% in taxes and stand in line for everything (but, I digress)?

Since you're 5'11", I wouldn't be too worried about handling the KLR. You race bikes; therefore, I am going to presume you have great balance and coordination. There is only really one difference in a bike and a motorcycle: Pedals v. Throttle/clutch.

If you can ride a bike, you should be able to ride a motorcycle! If you have never used a clutch on a car, "HOUSTON... we have a problem."

A motorcycle's clutch needs to be mastered and manipulated all the time on the dirt. I have raced motorcycles professionally (motorcross/supercross), so I can speak to this. Without mastering it, you can still ride and get by on the dirt; however, you lend yourself to the risk of falling or getting stuck in a situation. On the streets, you can get by; however, you lend yourself to risks of other people. Those "other people" are cars/BIG trucks. You don't ever want to just get by... you need to master the throttle/clutch before mixing it up with those other people.

If you have driven a stick in a vehicle and you ride bikes, you will have no problem being a master of the throttle/clutch. I am confident of that!!! I have been riding since I was five, so I can do have a little experience in what I am saying.

As far as hauling a trailer around with your motorcycle (m/c), I have seen it done before and seen some pictures of people doing it, but I have never asked anyone about the set up because I am never going to venture into doing it. If you see a guy or a picture, ask them. I like the two wheel feel, only. If you have a trailer, you will have to be super careful around corners, traffic, and things in the road (did I miss anything?). But, it can be done. A bike is not going to be a lot weight to haul on your m/c. It's the tools, supplies, spare parts, and spare bike that might make it difficult... but, what do I know? ... I haven't done it before.

Just go out and do it! Save money! Have fun! And, report back to us that it can be done... and, of course, your results from your races!

It is only a problem IF YOU THINK it is a problem. THINK about it.

No Problem Mon...

Let's Roll !!!
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post #4 of 4 Old 04-14-2009, 07:52 PM
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jamesh -

I don't know if your'e a roadie or a mountain biker - guess it shouldn't matter, though this might work out better for a mountain bike.

You can replace your right side passenger foot peg with a fork clamp. You then mount the bike to the clamp, handlebars truned to the left. Then you need to secure the back end of the bike to the rack and secure the wheel to the frame.

This has been done - you can go over to KLRWorld and look for BigLV's post on how she did it.

There's another fella over there that regularly transports his bike on his KLR, but I can't remember his handle at the moment. If I recall correctly, he had some sort of an arrangement where he had a rack that was off the back.

I suspect that the handlebars for a road bike might be problematic.

Tom
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