Yes it's about oil. - Page 6 - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #51 of 55 Old 06-26-2019, 10:15 AM
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Excuse a dumb question, there may be a difference between modern auto engines and m/c engines in how they handle crankcase fumes. In the old days car engines had a vent on the valve cover that let out oil fumes. Then they had PCVs that recirculated the fumes back into the intake manifold. M/C may have followed the same technology. So back to my question, aren't m/c crankcases sealed from the atmosphere? Obviously with heat there's expansion but with cooling is outside air introduced?
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post #52 of 55 Old 06-26-2019, 10:19 AM
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Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
The theory is sound but in practice, I've never seen any condensation form in engines in my heated shop. Of course if there was condensation it would form whether the engine had new or "used" oil in it.

Anyhow, I'm going to continue to consider it a non-issue for me and my stuff; as I said earlier, my 440-6 engine sat on a stand in my garage for 10 years before I installed it in the car.....ZERO condensation in the engine prior to start up.


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Dave
True, but new oil is less likely to form acids when it comes into contact with water. That is why most recommend to change oil in the fall prior to winter storage.

It also depends on where you live. If you live in Arizona, then you probably could not cause condensation if you tried. If you live in Miami, you probably can’t prevent it no matter how hard you try.
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Last edited by Voyager; 06-26-2019 at 10:50 AM.
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post #53 of 55 Old 06-26-2019, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Voyager View Post
True, but new oil is less likely to form acids when it comes into contact with water. That is why most recommend to change oil in the fall prior to winter storage.

It also depends on where you live. If you live in Arizona, the you probably could not cause condensation if your tried. If you live in Miami, you probably canít prevent it no matter how hard you try.
Yes, I agree on both points and while the recommendation is a good idea, I maintain it doesn't really matter much in the big scheme of things - or at least, it hasn't proven to matter in my set of conditions. I will admit that our climate is considered semi-arid and generally has very low humidity.

ps. I know I'm coming off as argumentative but I think we probably agree on more than we disagree; in any case, I've learned to appreciate your thoghtful and intellegent posts so while I may participate in a light hearted debate on certain points, I respect your opinion.

Cheers,
Dave
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post #54 of 55 Old 06-26-2019, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Yes, I agree on both points and while the recommendation is a good idea, I maintain it doesn't really matter much in the big scheme of things - or at least, it hasn't proven to matter in my set of conditions. I will admit that our climate is considered semi-arid and generally has very low humidity.

ps. I know I'm coming off as argumentative but I think we probably agree on more than we disagree; in any case, I've learned to appreciate your thoghtful and intellegent posts so while I may participate in a light hearted debate on certain points, I respect your opinion.

Cheers,
Dave
In a semi-arid climate, I agree it isn’t an issue. I live in a semi-humid climate in PA and, trust me, condensation is a real issue here. Maybe even worse than the southeast. They have more humidity, but they also tend to stay warm above the dew point. In the northeast, we have both humidity and temps that often cycle 40 degrees from day to night often swinging through the dewpoint.
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Last edited by Voyager; 06-27-2019 at 07:12 AM.
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post #55 of 55 Old 06-26-2019, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Lee_T View Post
Excuse a dumb question, there may be a difference between modern auto engines and m/c engines in how they handle crankcase fumes. In the old days car engines had a vent on the valve cover that let out oil fumes. Then they had PCVs that recirculated the fumes back into the intake manifold. M/C may have followed the same technology. So back to my question, aren't m/c crankcases sealed from the atmosphere? Obviously with heat there's expansion but with cooling is outside air introduced?
Lee_T, If they were 'sealed' they would make even less horsepower, due to pressure build-up under the piston.

Look at the top rear of the KLR transmission area for a steel nipple & black rubber hose about 3/4 inch OD. The black rubber hose (crankcase vent hose) connects to the clean side of the air filter box, near the top rear shock mount.

Higher rpm, large displacement, single cylinder engines are extremely hard to ventilate with a true Positive Crankcase Ventilation system. Twin cylinders are a little easier, Triples may actually fall between the singles & twins, as there are always either 2 pistons going up or 2 pistons going down. Four & more are readily properly ventilated.

Here is a thread for your reading pleasure, https://www.klrforum.com/klr-other-m...ntilation.html
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