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2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-05-2013 02:28 PM
Lockjaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
Perhaps we can make shape-shifting tires that can go from smooth to knobbie as we need.

Might be made from octopii hides.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmDTtkZlMwM

T
You can do it, Tom said shiftily.



08-05-2013 11:48 AM
wayne_l
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slowpoke View Post
Hi justjeff sounds like a great trip -

Our local county has been laying the gravel to the roads and with recent dry weather it is loose. Some roads have 6 in deep ridges of loose gravel, and some truck haul roads have "motorcycle traps" - punched out soft rutted spots that were not graded first, just graveled over. The KLR wags the bars back and forth, jigs around underneath you. You have to be paying attention.

Definitely helps with improving the "relax and weight the pegs" skills but most of us residents prefer properly maintained roads.

While the KLR is "all over the place" on these surfaces, my Triumph Tiger 955i at 100lbs more weight than the KLR rolls right along on it's bigger Metzler Tourance tyres, much more composed, with instant spin the rear wheel power on tap to power out of the out of shape bits. But you cannot body English it around so easily and I don't have the stand up ergo's fully sorted yet, so I take it cool.

I'm kind of in the same camp as justjeff - tire pressures seem to have more effect on different surfaces than this tire and that tire.

Just an opinion - I think the big knobby tires are taking damage on sharp gravel surface roads because they let stones into the carcass area. A less aggressive tire might work better on gravel / paved surfaces? It seems that round the world riders prefer these?
we have the same 2 bikes ..

I run the shinko 705s on my tiger on same roads as my klr and your right the heavier bike up front just seems to walk thru the loose gravel roads where my klr wanders a bit ..

but get the 21 in front wheel of klr in the technical 2 track versus the the 19 in wheel and it comes very clear wich is designed for what ..

while ive taken the tiger into places leaving others shaking their heads lol ,,

everyone sets up same bikes up so differently with add ons and different spring rates its hard to pin it down to a single issue ..

for me one my best gravel fixing issues wasn't tires or pressure but getting me comfortable standing and riding .. so I went to wider bigger pegs longer shifter and rox risers and slightly wider and taller pro taper bars ..

so now im standing naturally and over the front forks I have a lot more confidence now and enjoy swinging ass around corners ..

I still have not gotten comfortable on steep technical down hilling yet so lots of riding in my future to get it down lol ..
08-05-2013 10:58 AM
Tom Schmitz Perhaps we can make shape-shifting tires that can go from smooth to knobbie as we need.

Might be made from octopii hides.


T
08-05-2013 10:18 AM
justjeff The problem on a long trip is you never know when you really need the knobbies, especially the front. Yesterday the rain turned the dirt portions of the Forestry Trunk Road into 2"deep soup. I would have been SCREWED if I had the MEFO on the front!
Regards....justjeff
08-05-2013 08:56 AM
Slowpoke Hi justjeff sounds like a great trip -

Our local county has been laying the gravel to the roads and with recent dry weather it is loose. Some roads have 6 in deep ridges of loose gravel, and some truck haul roads have "motorcycle traps" - punched out soft rutted spots that were not graded first, just graveled over. The KLR wags the bars back and forth, jigs around underneath you. You have to be paying attention.

Definitely helps with improving the "relax and weight the pegs" skills but most of us residents prefer properly maintained roads.

While the KLR is "all over the place" on these surfaces, my Triumph Tiger 955i at 100lbs more weight than the KLR rolls right along on it's bigger Metzler Tourance tyres, much more composed, with instant spin the rear wheel power on tap to power out of the out of shape bits. But you cannot body English it around so easily and I don't have the stand up ergo's fully sorted yet, so I take it cool.

I'm kind of in the same camp as justjeff - tire pressures seem to have more effect on different surfaces than this tire and that tire.

Just an opinion - I think the big knobby tires are taking damage on sharp gravel surface roads because they let stones into the carcass area. A less aggressive tire might work better on gravel / paved surfaces? It seems that round the world riders prefer these?
08-05-2013 01:27 AM
justjeff So I am on a trip doing the Alberta Forestry Trunk Road. It is a mostly gravel road running from (near) GrandPrairie to Coleman. I have just completed the first 300k, 200 being gravel.
The first 50k sucked untill I got the tire pressure sorted. Same loose gravel over hardpack. I have the MT21 on the front again and the MEFO Explorer on the rear. I started dropping pressures and finally found stability in the basement.
I ended up with the front at 10psi and the rear at 15. Thats right folks! And don't try this without beadlocks!!
With the tires at those pressures I was able to cruise at 45mph without whiteknuckling it. The bike would finally come out of the ruts reasonably well and my heart rate wasn't at 180+ all the time.
I did 150k at those pressures in loose gravel, sand and mud. No major issues.
The bike is very heavily loaded with full gear. Bike, rider and gear weigh in at 825lbs. I KNOW, I am loosing weight, get off my back!!!

Regards....justjeff....from Hinton
07-13-2013 11:48 AM
Spec
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheapBassTurd View Post

...
One of my commute routes has three 1/2 mile unpaved sections. Plus there's
one farm I cross down the center division between fields. It's my favorite route
home taking my time and kicking around the rear end for fun and to stay in practice.
On one gravel I force the bike to go 50. The steering head angle (of nearly all bikes)
makes the KLR want to naturally right itself and it does actually a fine job of doing so.
The negative part is waiting those nerve racking milliseconds for the top half of the
assembly to catch up to the lower half dancing around in ruts and grooves. (The top
half being the top half of the bike and us too.) I stand just an inch or two off the seat
and weight rearward to let the front catch and release good grip and it hasn't thrown
me off yet in 13,000 miles. Regardless of the fact that so far it's come out fine every time,
feeling confident and comfortable in the loose just ain't happening in my life. LOL

Great thread, btw!

Enjoy the bugjuice of summer,
Cheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeap
Disclaimer: I don't have the type of gravel roads you guys are talking about but I do have deep soft sand, so I might be talking out of my you know what!

What I've found is that weighting the front end is better in the soft stuff. Get up to speed, stand up and get your head up over the triple clamps. The front end will track straight and true but the back end will wander which to me is a much better sensation than the front wandering!
07-13-2013 09:36 AM
justjeff My understanding is that TwistedThrottle is the importer of MEFO tires in North America. I purchased mine through AVsciousCycle who gets them from Twisted. When mine cracked like that AVC did the warrantee claim for me, as any good supplier should. It took a couple of weeks but I wasn't left hanging like your supplier is doing to you.
Shame on APEX for not standing behind their product and customer. I wouldn't buy a single thing from them in future and would spread the word far and wide. I would also let them know you are telling people how well they stand behind the product they sell.
I am sure TwistedThrottle will help, they are a quality supplier who has always stood behind the products I have purchased from them.

Regards....justjeff

P.S......Sorry about your torn JUGS too!!
jj
07-13-2013 06:31 AM
wayne_l
Quote:
Originally Posted by justjeff View Post
Did You try for warrantee? I just had to send them pictures of the damage and identification on the sidewall. They even paid the shipping.
jj
Went to Apex motor sports where I bought them here in the springs .When the tire started failing I called them from Canada and told me no worries and when I return they will help me out ..

I bought new hidenaus in Alaska and figured id take pics of the tires and lot numbers and deal with it when I return ..well I return all I got was here is the web address to twisted throttle and good luck ... no joke ..

here is what it started to do at just shy of 2k miles





these tires were a week old installed by the dealer by time I got to Alaska it was really bad and jugs were tearing ..
07-13-2013 05:38 AM
CheapBassTurd Went out and looked at the model number and I'm running a Bridgestone Trailwing-41.
Not that it matters much since our bikes are front heavy elephants
with skinny tires on a skinny tall rim. These things wallow around, period.
Luckily many of you fellas have farted around with differing treads and air
pressures and posted what's working best.

One of my commute routes has three 1/2 mile unpaved sections. Plus there's
one farm I cross down the center division between fields. It's my favorite route
home taking my time and kicking around the rear end for fun and to stay in practice.
On one gravel I force the bike to go 50. The steering head angle (of nearly all bikes)
makes the KLR want to naturally right itself and it does actually a fine job of doing so.
The negative part is waiting those nerve racking milliseconds for the top half of the
assembly to catch up to the lower half dancing around in ruts and grooves. (The top
half being the top half of the bike and us too.) I stand just an inch or two off the seat
and weight rearward to let the front catch and release good grip and it hasn't thrown
me off yet in 13,000 miles. Regardless of the fact that so far it's come out fine every time,
feeling confident and comfortable in the loose just ain't happening in my life. LOL

Great thread, btw!

Enjoy the bugjuice of summer,
Cheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeap
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