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  Topic Review (Newest First)
05-08-2008 08:00 PM
Florida Marine
Quote:
Originally Posted by All Thumbs View Post
The first step to mothballing a bike is to wash it and ride it dry. Lube the
chain, and pivot points like footpegs and levers. Lube the cables.

Always drain the float, and either drain or fill the tank with Stabil-ized gas. The carb float bowl is open to the air through the vent. Stabil in the gas will keep the gas in the tank from going bad, but do little to keep the gas in the float bowl from congealing into a tarry mess that gets sucked right into the jets when you try to start the bike, and then you need a carb cleaning. So drain it before you park it, and again before you start it, unless you *like* carb cleaning.

Since the KLR is water cooled, make sure you have good antifreeze, if the bike is going to freeze.
You might want to roll it up on a couple little planks of wood or something to get the rubber tires off the damp concrete. If you store it near a running electric motor, like a freezer or something, the ozone from the motor can rot the tires, over time.

If you put the bike in gear and roll it forward into compression, it'll close the intake and exhaust valves, sealing the combustion chamber from moisture.

When you de-mothball the bike, check the air filter for animal nests before starting the bike.

I disagree with the "change the oil but don't start it" advice. When you drain the old, acid-laden oil, you certainly don't get it all out, but if you circulate the new detergent-carrying oil by starting the engine, you neutralize the acid you left. The amount to wear on the new oil by running it for a couple of minutes is almost nothing. Actually, ideally you'd get the bike up to maximum operating temperature, to boil out any water in the oil system. But on a stock KLR, that doesn't really happen, so just change it and circulate it.

- Dave, under the shade tree
I put a few drops of oil in the spark plug hole and crank it with the plug out, the pressure comes up and pushes the new oil around the case...not as good as starting I will agree with you on the point, but good enough to mix in any old oil.

My dad was in the performance oil/lube business most of his life...he was the one I got that advice from, and he advised the same thing for my truck. Spin it with the plugs out or disconnected until the oil light went out and you were good to do.

I am sure there are a million other folks with different opinions, 3 deployments since 2004 and I have not had an issue with any of my rolling stock.

YMMV

Sean
05-08-2008 01:08 PM
All Thumbs The first step to mothballing a bike is to wash it and ride it dry. Lube the
chain, and pivot points like footpegs and levers. Lube the cables.

Always drain the float, and either drain or fill the tank with Stabil-ized gas. The carb float bowl is open to the air through the vent. Stabil in the gas will keep the gas in the tank from going bad, but do little to keep the gas in the float bowl from congealing into a tarry mess that gets sucked right into the jets when you try to start the bike, and then you need a carb cleaning. So drain it before you park it, and again before you start it, unless you *like* carb cleaning.

Since the KLR is water cooled, make sure you have good antifreeze, if the bike is going to freeze.
You might want to roll it up on a couple little planks of wood or something to get the rubber tires off the damp concrete. If you store it near a running electric motor, like a freezer or something, the ozone from the motor can rot the tires, over time.

If you put the bike in gear and roll it forward into compression, it'll close the intake and exhaust valves, sealing the combustion chamber from moisture.

When you de-mothball the bike, check the air filter for animal nests before starting the bike.

I disagree with the "change the oil but don't start it" advice. When you drain the old, acid-laden oil, you certainly don't get it all out, but if you circulate the new detergent-carrying oil by starting the engine, you neutralize the acid you left. The amount to wear on the new oil by running it for a couple of minutes is almost nothing. Actually, ideally you'd get the bike up to maximum operating temperature, to boil out any water in the oil system. But on a stock KLR, that doesn't really happen, so just change it and circulate it.

- Dave, under the shade tree
05-07-2008 08:37 PM
Florida Marine
Quote:
Originally Posted by majorlagg View Post
What type of action should I take for the onset of winter?
Is it ok to start it once a week to keep the battery charged or is that hard on the motor stirring up that frozen oil?
Any tips are great, thanks.
Since I got my 2005 I have deployed to Iraq 2x...not winterizing, but deployenizing...

I let some air out of the tires after I put it up on the center stand.

I drain the carb if I empty the tank, this year I just filled it and Stabil'd it, was easier then draining the tank...rust and gas spoiling are the issues to be concerned with.

Also, change the oil and DO NOT RUN IT AFTER YOU DO.

After you change it, pull the spark plug, put a squirt or three in the hole and spin the motor with the plug out to coat the cylinder walls...

Pull out the batt and put it on a charger.

Have done this twice in the past two years and both times come home with it good to go.

Sean
04-14-2008 09:47 AM
Paper
Quote:
Originally Posted by klrdan69 View Post
Paper, I loved your post. I tell my family that in Chicago they put down 3" of salt for every 1" of snow. Nice to know someone else shares my views.

I'm sure that you got to see this again, this year..
And since we got record snowfall this winter, they ran out of salt and then switched to using sand and gravel to add to the amount of daily snowfall..

On the other hand, as a KLR rider I don't mind sand and gravel..

Today was my first opportunity to ride to work. 37 degrees, clean roads, and light traffic.. If it weren't for actually having to go to work, it would have been perfect!!
04-13-2008 12:52 AM
klrdan69 Paper, I loved your post. I tell my family that in Chicago they put down 3" of salt for every 1" of snow. Nice to know someone else shares my views.
12-07-2007 01:29 PM
rickkd6 Other than dumping the tanks and draining the water from my non-enclosed cooling system on my boat I just top off the fuel tanks (prevents condensation) on my boat, motorhome and lawnmower. I try to let them run for 30 minutes or so when we get a nice day or two during the winter. I'm slowley converting everything to the spiral cell batteries. I agree with changing the oil. I've never had any fuel related issues from winter storage that I know of. Winter here in Carson City usually bottoms out around 0 degrees with normal daytime highs around 40.
Hope this helps,
Rick
12-07-2007 04:58 AM
Paper Major,
I typically don't start during the winter because you're going to warm the engine enough to get moisture into the oil. You need to really warm the bike up to get that moisture burnt off during the winter..

I have a float charger from Harbor Freight and use it. I dump in some Stabil and run the bike some to be sure that the Stabil's in everywhere. I then fill the tank as full as I can get it to keep the gas less exposed to air.

I change oil and filter before putting the bike away to be sure that the oil's fresh and as acid free as possible. I give the engine a good blast of WD-40 to help eliminate oxidation and I stick the bike up on a stand to take the weight off the suspension and tires. (more because I have a stand)

With the way IL and WI DUMP salt on the road, I typically ride from salt to salt. I don't have a way to wash the bike (I'd love a heated garage too) and I don't want to get salt on everything..

That first snow we had around here that put 1-2" on the road put about 1/2" of salt in many areas... Sometimes the salt is thicker than the snow.

I put the bike away, and round up my ice fishing stuff, and wish for spring..
12-06-2007 04:46 PM
TheWanderer Depends on the typical winter in your area. I'm in Southern Indiana and don't winterize mine. I have cold weather gear and will take the bike out for a few hours here and there. If we ever had major cold temps for extended periods I'd be more likely to park it for the entire winter.

Wish I had a nice heated garage!!!
12-06-2007 02:35 PM
BIGIRON If you're not going to ride at all, I'd consider a full winterize -- drain tank, carb, remove battery and keep it on float charger, etc -- standard stuff.

If you are going to ride some, I'd keep it on float charger and use Stabil or such in the gas.
12-06-2007 12:00 PM
majorlagg
Winterize...

What type of action should I take for the onset of winter?
Is it ok to start it once a week to keep the battery charged or is that hard on the motor stirring up that frozen oil?
Any tips are great, thanks.

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