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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-23-2016 07:49 AM
Grinnin justjeff, I was looking for anything that was different from what didn't work. Lots of dissimilar plastics look (and mostly act) similar.

Thanks larry31 for the suggestion to make a heat shield. I have enough scrap metal to cut something to fit. Heck, I have old heat shields still in the metal bin from other projects.
01-22-2016 08:30 PM
larry31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
So I'm pondering how to apply enough heat to a couple inches of that ridge to restore the finish. The slaughtering iron will be too small and cause dimples. I have a Smith Littletorch that may be just right. The flame doesn't have to touch the plastic to heat the surface enough to gloss over.

As far as testing, I may not splash through any water this week. Next week either.

Suggestion, shield areas you don't want heat to be. Space some metal pieces over the blocking areas.
01-22-2016 06:58 PM
justjeff Nice work Grinnin! Thanks for the update. What made you think of the coffee can lid?
Regards....justjeff
01-22-2016 02:54 PM
Grinnin Progress report: part way there. The point of each photo is dead center.

When we last saw the luggage leak it looked like this:


I put the soldering iron to it and used the same filler that I've used on KLR bodywork. They both melted but the plastics remained separate. I switched to strips cut from a Folgers coffee plastic lid and it melted in very smoothly:


Then I trimmed it down to almost level with an Exacto knife:


It's still 0.04" high:


The last photo shows the harsh light more than my ruined gloss.

I'll pause now to ponder the next step. I've ruined the glossy surface and I think that that gloss helps make a better seal. Leaving it .04 high will be fine (You can see marks in the grey gasket material where the original gap was). Melting or trimming it down to about 0.02" high is my goal.

So I'm pondering how to apply enough heat to a couple inches of that ridge to restore the finish. The slaughtering iron will be too small and cause dimples. I have a Smith Littletorch that may be just right. The flame doesn't have to touch the plastic to heat the surface enough to gloss over.

As far as testing, I may not splash through any water this week. Next week either.
12-20-2015 03:47 PM
justjeff Hmmm...Guess I found that out by accident!
JJ
12-20-2015 01:46 PM
GoMotor This is from :

http://www.adhesives.org/docs/defaul...g.pdf?sfvrsn=0

These are techniques where the surface is cleaned and chemically modified by exposure to
highly energetic charges or other ionic species. The most common methods are flame
treatment, corona discharge and plasma. These pre-treatment methods have been applied
to metals and, in particular, composites and plastics.

Flame treatment of the substrate surface for just a few seconds with
an oxygen-containing (blue) propane or acetylene gas flame leads to
the incorporation of oxygen-containing groups at the surface. This
improves the wetting properties and hence the adhesion. Flame
treatment is used almost exclusively for polyethylene and
polypropylene substrates. The effect of the pretreatment subsides
within a short time so that flame-treated substrates must be bonded
immediately.
12-20-2015 10:33 AM
justjeff Don't forget you have to give us an update when it's fixed!
JJ
12-20-2015 03:52 AM
Grinnin Thanks everyone for your ideas.
12-19-2015 11:11 AM
pdwestman Grinnin,
For those small raised ribs, one might test to see how well 'Shoe Goo' or 'Automotive Goop' bonds to the base material. They get firm enough in 24 hours that you might could blend the contours with a Dremel tool.
12-19-2015 10:50 AM
Tom Schmitz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grinnin View Post
Your experiments in repairing poly with ABS cement could be good news for me. I may continue your experiments.

While I've been riding regularly, there is likely to be a couple months of real snow. The long warm autumns here have a flip side in long cold springs.
In my case (pun intended) I had a set of holes drilled for the original mounting on a Moose rack, then I changed the mounting holes for use with CycleRack supports, and finally I have built another mounting system for the CycleRack.

What I'm fixing is drilled holes. It could well be that the ABS trick is working because there are minor imperfections in the drilled hole that the ABS is locking into once it hardens. There are only two holes that haven't patched well and I had though that it was poor surface prep. It might be that those holes are simply too smooth.

I think the soldering iron and welding is the best bet for a real repair on poly.

Tom
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