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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-10-2010 09:46 AM
Duseldorf Humperdink
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockjaw View Post
Too lazy to go through all the posts so sorry if someone mentioned this, but Spec recently reminded me...if you haven't read 'proficient motorcycling' by Hough, that's a great start. Taking a course is a whole different animal (and a good idea)...I was a little skeptical when told about the book, but someone with way more riding experience than me suggested it. It is basically the 'how to ride a MC' bible. I'm gonna read it again, I think. It should be a mandatory read.
+1 Very good read. Kind of the mechanics/physics of motorcycling and riding awareness.
05-16-2010 07:01 PM
Lockjaw Yeah, you're right. It's more about how to stay alive. See, I need to read it again.

In my mind 'how to ride a motorcycle' has less to do with the mechanics of riding and a lot to do with being able to keep riding because you haven't been maimed. Learning to operate a MC is easy. Learning how to ride is a lifelong endeavor (literally). That's what I meant, but it was misleading, thanks for clarifying.



05-16-2010 06:26 PM
flash
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockjaw View Post
Too lazy to go through all the posts so sorry if someone mentioned this, but Spec recently reminded me...if you haven't read 'proficient motorcycling' by Hough, that's a great start. Taking a course is a whole different animal (and a good idea)...I was a little skeptical when told about the book, but someone with way more riding experience than me suggested it. It is basically the 'how to ride a MC' bible. I'm gonna read it again, I think. It should be a mandatory read.
Funny you should post that. Bought it a couple weeks ago and am about 3/4 through it. Agree, should be required reading. For me it's more of a 'how to stay alive' guide. This one is worthy of keeping for a refresher every so often.
05-16-2010 05:53 PM
Lockjaw Too lazy to go through all the posts so sorry if someone mentioned this, but Spec recently reminded me...if you haven't read 'proficient motorcycling' by Hough, that's a great start. Taking a course is a whole different animal (and a good idea)...I was a little skeptical when told about the book, but someone with way more riding experience than me suggested it. It is basically the 'how to ride a MC' bible. I'm gonna read it again, I think. It should be a mandatory read.



05-16-2010 04:19 PM
weld387 I just got my 09 in March of this year. Was told the same things. It has been 20 years since I rode the streets last. Had a dirt bike a couple of years ago. The KLR 650 is a different bike. Much heavier then a Honda CRF230. Most of my riding has been on pavement back and forth to work. Have over 1,300 miles on the bike now. With break in and getting used to it. I am taken it easy for the most part. Learning the feel of how it leans in turns. Stopping and down shifting are still a big part of the fun. The only thing thats changed is I am in my mid 40's. I no longer feel the need to go 0 to 60 in 3 seconds. This is not the FZR 750 I had. It's a very forgiven bike with lots of nice controls. It was once told to me when I got my first bike. 1977 KZ 650, You never will master a bike. But you can have a working relationship with it has long has you don't think you are the master. Lockjaw is right about fixation. He is also not the first person to say this. Has for the dirt part. I will be doing this after I feel a little more secure with the handling on the bike on pavement first. I have riddin some dirt roads to get a slight feel of the traction and handling. I will start out on some of the easier ORV trails. Go from there. The bike is geared great for slow navagation of ruts and bumps. It did warm up real quick with the very limited trail riding I did. Right off you see the weight of the KLR. I could throw the Honda 230 around. Not the case so far with this KLR. I will be getting some nerf bars for the bike soon after I do my Doo hickey. Then I should be ready for the trail ridding. Just take it easy man. Enjoy learning the bike. I know I am.
05-15-2010 02:51 PM
Lockjaw
Quote:
Originally Posted by chel_in_il View Post
Not to skew this thread from topic (although it is about safety and riding better), but what you mean by what I have quoted?
I don't know about any state but CA, but I assume this refers to something that drives me NUTS! In CA, you have to pass a written test and a riding test that involves cone weave, stopping, and riding in a circle. You can take the test on a 150cc scooter and then you are fully legal on the Hayabusa you buy the next day. Until you die, that is.

A guy I worked with who was buying a giant Harley asked me a few years ago to use my Kymco 150 for the test. I told him no way. Pass the test on the bike you're gonna ride. AND the test should be much harder.



05-15-2010 10:54 AM
walkman "Target Fixation" man do I have a story. Out riding with a buddy in the desert, tight quarters narrow path. I came around a tight bend in some nasty sand, there right in the middle of the path is this hugh nasty cactus ( I'm in AZ ). All I was thinking, was man do I not want to hit that.... But stare on I did, as my eyes got wider my path to disaster got more focused.... the route around was not a tough ride, I was just not in the right frame of mind. At the last second I realized what was happening and I corrected my thought process, not so much my riding. Disaster avoided!
05-13-2010 10:31 PM
chel_in_il
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeoriaMac View Post
(On the soapbox mode) It's regrettable that my state of Illinois, and I'm sure a lot of others, makes it so easy to get a license without taking formal training. All of us would be better off -- especially the folks who later find they shouldn't be riding a bike in the first place. (soapbox mode off)

Not to skew this thread from topic (although it is about safety and riding better), but what you mean by what I have quoted?
04-19-2010 06:51 AM
flash
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnk8080 View Post
No doubt, look where you might not always in a car. If you can see trouble way ahead of time, you can avoid a situation just by slowing down. Sometimes I find myself being offensive. For example, I hate when a car enters the left turn lane (coming across my direction), this is obviously an instant threat. Sometimes I accelerate to "beat" them from even making the turn. I know this sounds stupid but I only do it when they are just entering the turn "lane" not the actual turn. Anyone else use this practice?
Yes. It's a fine line. The throttle can get you out of, as well as into trouble. Just don't fixate on the threat.

I won't dally around using the gas to get around semi's and trucks or trailers hauling loose or lightly secured materials (twine to hold a refrigerator say). Seen too much crap blow out. Get around, quick.
04-19-2010 01:08 AM
CheapBassTurd John 8080,
You make a very valid point on the front end weight. It feels weird, but the front rarely
goes awry. It's just an uneasy feeling. You are right about bringing up the speed too.
You can gas it to kick the back around to straighten things up in a hurry when needed.
At low speeds, ie: first and 2nd gear, these bikes have incredible amounts of torque
and on demand power available. Use it.

Getting used to my XL 600R and DR650 back in the day was the same. Now with
the generation 2 KLR's they are even heavier up front. Time to learn all over again.
Practice practice practice.
.
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