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Thread: First oil change and drain plug questions Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-17-2018 10:18 PM
AlanS I didn't read all 4 pages of the thread. Apologies, if this is redundant. If the plug isn't pouring oil during a short run after an oil change, then you're good-to-go. Check it again after the first ride. 15 ft-pnds is what I've been using, based on EM's recommendation, and it doesn't leak, or even seep.

Alan
06-17-2018 04:42 PM
clogan Would the WD40 clean/no lube method (which I use, BTW) apply to all chain-drive bikes, or only to the KLR?

I ask, because, somehow, it just feels wrong to not clean and re-lube the chain on my Super Duke every 600 miles, per the owner's manual. What a hassle...on a bike with no center stand, to boot!

Chain maintenance sure is easier on my KLR: clean it once in a while, and ride on! Of course, the SD probably has 5 times the torque if a KLR...but maybe that doesn't matter all that much. Hmmm....

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
06-14-2018 03:36 PM
DPelletier
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
Dave, Just for my understanding. Were most of your former competition bikes running Non o-ring chains? They absolutely needed the heavier, stickier chain lubes to penetrate into the rivet & bushing area to reduce the wear.

With o-rings sealing the rivet and bushing, the only surfaces we can lube are the bushing to roller and roller to sprocket teeth.
With lighter lubes like WD-40 I've seen the rollers rattling around bushings of several drive chains.
Almost all used sealed chains - certainly all within the last 20 years. Yes, non sealed chains need lube as you say - we used lube on our sealed chains anyhow though it may well have been mostly just because that's what we always did and that's what everyone else at the track was doing. Obviously the lube doesn't get past the O rings so it does nothing for those internal wear areas - all it can do on a sealed chain is to lube the roller to sprocket interface......and while this SEEMS like a good idea, I'm not sure if the extra wear attributed to attracting dirt to the sticky chain lube offsets any improvement due to the lubricant on these same surfaces.

In an ideal chain environment you would run it enclosed with a supply or clean oil or other lubricant (like a timing or balancing chain) but when exposed to dirt, mud, dust, water, cow crap, etc. etc......I'm less certain that any lube isn't doing as much harm as good.

....which brings us all back to the beginning; 34,000 miles is far more than I need or expect from my chains and sprockets so I'll happily stick with the WD on my KLR's since I'll only ever run sealed chains from here on out. ....I ALMOST forget how much of a PITA it was to keep those old non sealed chains adjusted!


Dave
06-14-2018 02:51 PM
pdwestman
Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Just to be 1000% clear, I used chainlube/chainwax on my offroad racing bikes for years. I believe that it's possible that in certain conditions, the application of such lubes may extend chain and sprocket life. That said, Watt-Mans testing has convinced me that I can get "reasonable" chain life using WD40 only -


Cheers,
Dave
Dave, Just for my understanding. Were most of your former competition bikes running Non o-ring chains? They absolutely needed the heavier, stickier chain lubes to penetrate into the rivet & bushing area to reduce the wear.

With o-rings sealing the rivet and bushing, the only surfaces we can lube are the bushing to roller and roller to sprocket teeth.
With lighter lubes like WD-40 I've seen the rollers rattling around bushings of several drive chains.
06-14-2018 02:13 PM
Damocles Scott Oiler oil viscosity exceeds that of WD40 greatly; adjusting a Scott Oiler for appropriate application rate might be a problem, although surely within the realm of possibility.
06-14-2018 01:47 PM
DPelletier
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
I believe that one can purchase WD-40 in gallon non-aerosol cans and the Scott Oilers are adjustable, are they not?

Couldn't one use WD-40 in the Scott Oilers?
Yes, you can get WD in gallon containers and though WD is much lighter than any other chain lubricant you would use, I'm sure you could figure out how to adjust the Oiler to work with it......but WD isn't really a lube so I'd question it's value in that application; it'd likely just spin off - after all, those of us that are using it are using it mainly as a cleaner and to prevent corrosion. I wipe down my chains after spraying with WD and let the bike sit for a bit before riding.

2 cents,
Dave
06-14-2018 11:28 AM
pdwestman I believe that one can purchase WD-40 in gallon non-aerosol cans and the Scott Oilers are adjustable, are they not?

Couldn't one use WD-40 in the Scott Oilers?
06-14-2018 10:50 AM
DPelletier my Scott oiler is sitting in my spare parts bin along with my vacuum petcock, sidestand safety switch, snorkle and snorkle cover and anything else I deem as superfluous! ;-)


Just to be 1000% clear, I used chainlube/chainwax on my offroad racing bikes for years. I believe that it's possible that in certain conditions, the application of such lubes may extend chain and sprocket life. That said, Watt-Mans testing has convinced me that I can get "reasonable" chain life using WD40 only - I don't expect to get 34,000 miles (which would take me about 10 years given my current use and splitting my time between bikes) but if I get even half that, I'd be happy because avoiding the mess is worth more than the cost of a chain/sprocket set every 5-10 years.

My 2001 came with a Scott oiler and after spending a whole day cleaning that combination of oil, dirt and mud off my engine, frame, swingarm, hub and wheel, I tossed it aside.

If one's use is significantly different from mine (commuting, daily use, long distances, heavy mileage) then likely your opinion on the best way to treat your chain might too - and I respect that. If nothing else, Bill's testing showed what is possible and what to expect using WD40 only.


Cheers,
Dave
06-14-2018 07:36 AM
KLR Kool-Aid! If I may contribute my two cents to this WD40 discussion...

I have been doing the WD40 thing exclusively for the past 30 K miles, and I haven't had any complaint. My last chain/sprocket set was still in pretty good shape at about 25 K miles, and I think the WD40 is less of a mess than the other (stickier) chain lube.

More important, I like the way WD40 cleans all the grit/sand out of the chain - I don't think the stickier lubes would be as good for that, so maybe it depends more on the terrain that one rides, and how their chain ends up?

The downside of more rapid application (every tank or so) is offset, in my mind, by the cheapness and ubiquity of WD40; it's around $7 USD for a big can at the local hardware, whereas "real" chain lube is around $11 at the nearest power supply store.

Thanks!

"I cannot think of a single Tom Swiftie about highly-soluble petroleum distillates or aliphatic hydrocarbons..." Tom darkly fumed.
06-13-2018 09:20 PM
shoebox1.1 I find the Scott Oiler fascinating
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