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2008+ KLR650 Wrenching & Mod Questions For repair, maintaining or modifying discussions related to the newly updated 2008 and beyond, Generation 2 KLR650 Motorcycle.

Thread: Install of grease Zerks/fittings info Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-28-2019 11:00 PM
Sportinh2o
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
rodent64, As others have suggested, we are a little confused by your statements.

Yes, I use the Allen Drive, 1/16th NPT brass pipe plug, drilled to my tested choice Orifice Size, in either the 6:00 oil port of the Oil Filter CAP or the Clutch Cover 6:00 oil port to the crankshaft. I have also used a short 8mm x 1.25p annealed set screw. And others have used short 5/16" x 18t annealed set screws.

But as to grease zerk threads, one needs to use the appropriate thread tap. Metric threaded grease zerks are hard to find, but they do exist.

This is "The Best", most Complete KLR rear suspension grease zerk article that I have Ever Read!
http://www.watt-man.com/uploads/ZerkInstallation.pdf

ps, But it does miss "Those 2 Stupid factory Holes"! As see here, https://www.souperdoo.com/stuff%20th...-zerk-fittings

I just use RTV or common 4mm screws on the 2 stupid holes.

Ah, hell. I bought a Florida bike. You know, it kinda had a bit of a "patina" in some areas! I can see needing to do this sooner than later. I've changed out a ton of fasteners with the stainless button cap kit you find on eBay.

Excellent post and info share. Thanks much. I'll earmark it for future reference.
02-27-2019 04:53 PM
rodent64
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
rodent64,
I feel the need to clarify a detail about the bolded portion of your statement, if I may? At least for other readers benefit, not solely for you.

The purpose of the restrictor orifice is to reduce excessive over-oiling of the cylinder wall, piston & rings.
Excessive over-oiling of those parts tends to cause these and other larger engines to consume engine oil when revved to 5000 rpm and above for sustained periods.

While it is true that the oil in question does flow thru the bottom rod bearing, that bearing is of rolling element design, like a two stroke crankshaft. Not a precision plain bearing, like an automobile engine.
The oil is simply diverted to other portions of the engine which can benefit to some extra volume & pressure.
Well... I know what I was trying to say by restricting oil flow path to the crank (brgs included) means more oil and pressure going someplace else ( like the cams/ head ) I know the purpose is to reduce the amount of oil thrown/sprayed on the cylinder walls therefore to reduce oil consumption. I just didnít take time to say all of it. My bad. Not my intention to confuse anyone. Sometimes I just take it for granted what Iím are talking about. Thanks for catching that though.
02-27-2019 12:56 PM
DPelletier
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdwestman View Post
Once one re-greases the entire assembly and plugs the 2 stupid holes, one will only need to regrease the assembly bolts & the bearings once every 25,000 - 50,000 miles though, not even every year.
Agreed with a caveat; it depends a bit on usage - as I tend to do a few water crossings every year, I like to grease the pivot bolt more often. ....that said, it's typically "all good" when I do take it apart.

Cheers,
Dave
02-27-2019 12:44 PM
pdwestman
Quote:
Originally Posted by DPelletier View Post
Yep, filling that cavity is a bad idea IMO and, like Paul said, it doesn't and can't lube the bearings themselves.......it's a lot of grease and mess to protect the bolt which can easily be protected by simply removing it once a year or so and coating it with grease.


Dave
Once one re-greases the entire assembly and plugs the 2 stupid holes, one will only need to regrease the assembly bolts & the bearings once every 25,000 - 50,000 miles though, not even every year.
02-27-2019 10:13 AM
DPelletier Yep, filling that cavity is a bad idea IMO and, like Paul said, it doesn't and can't lube the bearings themselves.......it's a lot of grease and mess to protect the bolt which can easily be protected by simply removing it once a year or so and coating it with grease.


Dave
02-27-2019 06:30 AM
Voyager
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
Voyager spilled the beans, didn't he? I knew that guy was shady.
Hey! I resemble that remark!
02-26-2019 10:51 PM
Tom Schmitz Voyager spilled the beans, didn't he? I knew that guy was shady.
02-26-2019 10:04 PM
samuel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
Later on, when it gets hot, that grease will melt and make a mess all over everything.
Super glad you figured this out, Tom!
02-18-2019 04:34 PM
Voyager
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Schmitz View Post
The cavity is huge. You will wind up injecting a ton of grease. The axle tube on the right side has a vent hole leading into the right side frame member. It is likely that as you are injecting grease into the cavity that you will fill the right side frame member at least partially with grease. Later on, when it gets hot, that grease will melt and make a mess all over everything.

Now, you may be wondering how I know all of this. Let's keep this between you and me, Voyager, and let's just say that I'd prefer you not ask how I know this for fear that I'd wind up looking stupid to the forum membership at large. Wink-wink, nudge-nudge and all that, OK?

This is why I've taken to installing the swing-arm axle, fogging the interior of the cavity with chain lube, rotating the axle and fogging again (to get the backside the first fogging might have missed) and then buttoning things up. Finish off by putting a bit of electrical tape over the holes and then a smear of RTV over the tape; see photo above.
Mums the word.
02-18-2019 12:15 PM
Tom Schmitz The cavity is huge. You will wind up injecting a ton of grease. The axle tube on the right side has a vent hole leading into the right side frame member. It is likely that as you are injecting grease into the cavity that you will fill the right side frame member at least partially with grease. Later on, when it gets hot, that grease will melt and make a mess all over everything.

Now, you may be wondering how I know all of this. Let's keep this between you and me, Voyager, and let's just say that I'd prefer you not ask how I know this for fear that I'd wind up looking stupid to the forum membership at large. Wink-wink, nudge-nudge and all that, OK?

This is why I've taken to installing the swing-arm axle, fogging the interior of the cavity with chain lube, rotating the axle and fogging again (to get the backside the first fogging might have missed) and then buttoning things up. Finish off by putting a bit of electrical tape over the holes and then a smear of RTV over the tape; see photo above.
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