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Thread: Installing Spools on 2009 KLR? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-28-2011 08:14 AM
650Stew I picked up a hydraulic bike lift on sale, works fantastic for chain maintenance, tire changes, etc. I have also used it on my street bike and two ATV's... Kind of a multipurpose tool. For as often as I have to lube the chains it has paid for itself many times over!
08-28-2011 12:59 AM
planalp Very nice. Good work. If I had one of those, I'd use it all the time.



08-27-2011 07:08 PM
maprimm
Bike Stand

I Build these position it back for rear wheel up or forward for front wheel up
enjoy.





08-08-2011 05:12 PM
NH Thumper
Quote:
Originally Posted by zapman View Post
Thanks for sharing your design Thumper. ..
Not my design. Just something I found on-line. Good luck.
08-08-2011 12:29 AM
zapman Thanks for sharing your design Thumper. I've got a bunch of 2x4s left over from another project. I'll give it a shot this weekend.
08-07-2011 10:25 PM
NH Thumper Here's an idea:
http://www.klr650.marknet.us/lift.html
08-07-2011 03:52 AM
zapman
Quote:
Originally Posted by planalp View Post
My '09 doesn't have any threaded holes in the swingarm for spools.

I use footpeg-lowering brackets, so I can't use a centerstand.

For basic chain maintenance, I use an Eagle Mike's Quick Jack, but a length of 2x2 or similar wood propped under the right side of the swingarm while the bike is on the sidestand will do the same thing: just push the bike over to the left until the wheel comes off the ground and then stick the wood or whatever under the swingarm. Some people make some nifty propping devices using old aluminum crutches.

I wouldn't want to be doing any serious wrenching on the thing with it propped up like that, but it works as long as you loosen/tighten everything before you prop it up and after you let it back down. It works fine for lubing/adjusting the chain, cleaning brake rotors, etc.

Locking the front brake with a piece of velcro, electrical tape, etc. around the lever is a good idea when doing this.

I've removed and reinstalled both the front and rear wheels/tires using the Quick Jack on a gravel surface with no problems.

If I want to get the bike up on a more stable platform or want both wheels off the ground at the same time, I just put a concrete block under each footpeg bracket then rock the bike from side to side, adding wooden shims on top of the concrete block and under the footpeg bracket.

It's a little labor-intensive, but it uses materials I already have on hand and once the thing is sitting on the blocks and pieces of wood, it's solid as a rock.

If you prefer to be less "hillbilly," check out places like Harbor Freight and Northern Tool: they carry some motorcycle lifts.
Thanks for the quick reply. I will experiment with my own concrete blocks and see what works best.
08-07-2011 12:48 AM
planalp
Quote:
Originally Posted by terry_1956 View Post
I use a sissor jack on the opposite side of the kickstand, works great, got it out of an old Honda.
What a great idea. I've got an old scissors jack I sometimes use to lift the front ends of my mowers. Next time I need to lift the KLR I'll give it a shot.

Really don't think I ever would have thought of that. Thanks.



08-06-2011 04:10 PM
terry_1956 I use a sissor jack on the opposite side of the kickstand, works great, got it out of an old Honda.
08-06-2011 02:25 PM
planalp My '09 doesn't have any threaded holes in the swingarm for spools.

I use footpeg-lowering brackets, so I can't use a centerstand.

For basic chain maintenance, I use an Eagle Mike's Quick Jack, but a length of 2x2 or similar wood propped under the right side of the swingarm while the bike is on the sidestand will do the same thing: just push the bike over to the left until the wheel comes off the ground and then stick the wood or whatever under the swingarm. Some people make some nifty propping devices using old aluminum crutches.

I wouldn't want to be doing any serious wrenching on the thing with it propped up like that, but it works as long as you loosen/tighten everything before you prop it up and after you let it back down. It works fine for lubing/adjusting the chain, cleaning brake rotors, etc.

Locking the front brake with a piece of velcro, electrical tape, etc. around the lever is a good idea when doing this.

I've removed and reinstalled both the front and rear wheels/tires using the Quick Jack on a gravel surface with no problems.

If I want to get the bike up on a more stable platform or want both wheels off the ground at the same time, I just put a concrete block under each footpeg bracket then rock the bike from side to side, adding wooden shims on top of the concrete block and under the footpeg bracket.

It's a little labor-intensive, but it uses materials I already have on hand and once the thing is sitting on the blocks and pieces of wood, it's solid as a rock.

If you prefer to be less "hillbilly," check out places like Harbor Freight and Northern Tool: they carry some motorcycle lifts.



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