Riding while standing - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 39 Old 05-23-2012, 10:08 PM Thread Starter
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Cool Riding while standing

Still kind of new to riding off pavement. Looking for a piece of advice. I am getting very comfortable in all sorts of off road situations from gravel fire roads to tight technical single track. As I am riding with more and more people off road I am seeing everyone standing on the pegs in all sorts of situations. Some ride standing for long periods of time as well. The only time I stand is to absorb a big bump on the road or something.

So to get to the point in what situations is standing benificial and why? Also How do you practice this. After seeing them I tried and it just does not feel right to me. I feel I have way more control sitting. Is it a preference? Any input would be great.


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post #2 of 39 Old 05-23-2012, 10:37 PM
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hey bud ,,,iam with you
have better control seated,,besides iam 6'4'' and unstable when do stand,,,never stand really when rideing wet ,muddy areas...

only stand when butt hurts ,bumps/jumps, and or to look over cars as to see if able to pass...

i crashed pretty hard one time standing,,hit mud puddle an slided to stop in the mud,, just because i couldn't put foot down ,,,me an bike when down...

so ride as you feel fit,,what is easy,best for you!!!!!
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post #3 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 12:07 AM
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There are times when you have to stand. If not, I usually don't. Unless I'm on the way home from a trip and airing out the uh...yeah, or on uneven terrain, loose knees, find your center and Poingoingoing.....




"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

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post #4 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 12:21 AM
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Standing on the pegs effectively lowers the center of gravity of the bike/rider from seat height to the lowest point on the bike besides where the tires touch the ground or, I suppose, the wheel axles.

It might not seem like it when you're standing up, but it's true because all your body weight is now transferred to the pegs, not the seat. I've found that it makes it much easier to negotiate surfaces like large rocks, etc.

If you're sitting down and the bike starts to move/jerk/lean back and forth, your mass/weight is imparted and added to that movement kind of like a pendulum. If you're standing up, your mass/weight, resting fully on the two foot pegs that are only about a foot apart or so and a few inches above the ground is kind of negated, depending on how much of a death grip you have on your bars. If you just let your bike do its thing, momentum and the gyroscopic forces of the wheels/tires will pretty much keep it going in a straight line as long as you're going fast enough.

Only drawback to standing on the pegs is, once you start going over, it's very hard to get a foot off the peg and get a leg out to stop yourself.

My rule has always kind of been that if I'm going fast enough for the inertia/momentum of the bike to work, I stand up. If I'm going slow enough that it doesn't really give me an advantage, I sit down.

If you have the stock rubber footpegs, I would recommend not standing on them in wet conditions.

I really don't know how standing/sitting affects rear wheel traction, but it doesn't seem like it would be much since when you're sitting all your weight is transferred down through the shock to a point not far behind the pegs, anyway.

My rule of thumb is if I'm going fairly fast over obstacles, I'll stand up. If I'm moving slowly enough that I really don't have any momentum, I'll just sit, although sticking a leg out to try to keep my balance might be riskier (potential injury-wise) than just simply falling over.




Last edited by planalp; 05-24-2012 at 12:26 AM.
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post #5 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 12:29 AM
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Fine, if you want a good answer.

Yup. Serrated pegs. Don't get twitchy with the brakes or throttle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by planalp View Post
Standing on the pegs effectively lowers the center of gravity of the bike/rider from seat height to the lowest point on the bike besides where the tires touch the ground or, I suppose, the wheel axles.

It might not seem like it when you're standing up, but it's true because all your body weight is now transferred to the pegs, not the seat. I've found that it makes it much easier to negotiate surfaces like large rocks, etc.

If you're sitting down and the bike starts to move/jerk/lean back and forth, your mass/weight is imparted and added to that movement kind of like a pendulum. If you're standing up, your mass/weight, resting fully on the two foot pegs that are only about a foot apart or so and a few inches above the ground is kind of negated, depending on how much of a death grip you have on your bars. If you just let your bike do its thing, momentum and the gyroscopic forces of the wheels/tires will pretty much keep it going in a straight line as long as you're going fast enough.

Only drawback to standing on the pegs is, once you start going over, it's very hard to get a foot off the peg and get a leg out to stop yourself.

My rule has always kind of been that if I'm going fast enough for the inertia/momentum of the bike to work, I stand up. If I'm going slow enough that it doesn't really give me an advantage, I sit down.

If you have the stock rubber footpegs, I would recommend not standing on them in wet conditions.

I really don't know how standing/sitting affects rear wheel traction, but it doesn't seem like it would be much since when you're sitting all your weight is transferred down through the shock to a point not far behind the pegs, anyway.

My rule of thumb is if I'm going fairly fast over obstacles, I'll stand up. If I'm moving slowly enough that I really don't have any momentum, I'll just sit, although sticking a leg out to try to keep my balance might be riskier (potential injury-wise) than just simply falling over.



"In a car you're always in a compartment, and because you're used to it you don't realize that through that car window everything you see is just more TV." R. Pirsig

PPMC #1.
Soon, we ride.

AKA JD Mader or you can call me "Dan" just not early for dinner.

Click my handle for a link to my homepage/blog...which has nothing to do with MCs. Free literature and music! Viva La Revolucion!
-------------------
2008 KLR 650
RIP DM - Soon, we ride.
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post #6 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 12:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lockjaw View Post
Fine, if you want a good answer.
Oh yeah, should have added a caveat that back in the days when I did my best to impersonate Malcolm Smith, I probably spent more time pinned under my bike and trying to get it off me than I did either standing on the pegs or sitting on the seat.

For some reason, I always fell to the left. I think it has something to do with being North of the Equator, kind of like the way a sink or toilet bowl drains counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere.



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post #7 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 01:31 AM
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hey planalp..
do find sitting even bit farther back ,,not hugging tank ,,,with knobbies off-road, seems like able to put more weight on rear suspension an help plant rear for better traction...
when stand up yes splits the weight front/rear = great for jumps ...but as for keeping tire planted firmly on ground,,up hill,muddy, off camber areas...
you speak of gryoscrop/momentum = ever water ski/snow board and catch an edge...wwwam..ah.. so figure when standing same rule applies...further from ground=harder you fall.?.?.?.
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post #8 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 03:43 AM
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Physically, standing raises the center-of-gravity of the man-motorcycle assemblage.

The moment-of-inertia is altered, making the assembly more dynamically stable.

Watch a spinning ice skater; extending arms slows the rate of rotation; tucking the arms, they spin like an electric drill. Altering the moment-of-inertia produces the change.

Or, my concept of physical mechanics is flawed (quite possibly).

FULL DISCLOSURE: I have NOT mastered standing to enhance my own motorcycle-riding stability.

The concepts of inertia and angular stability are discussed more coherenty here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_of_inertia

Simple demonstration:

Have a buddy hold bike up, standing at front fork. Mount bike, sit, hands on handlebars. Have buddy shake bike side-to-side.

Then, stand on pegs, hands on handlebars, hug tank with knees. Have buddy again shake bike side-to-side.

Notide any difference in the ease of angular excursion in the two cases?

Last edited by LoneRider; 05-24-2012 at 03:56 AM.
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post #9 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 06:08 AM
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I stand to let the bike "float" around under me without
tossing me all over n' bouncing the backside and backbone.
More like lifting above the seat in a slight slouch.
I don't stand all the way up as some do.

A few good spinal compressions'll have ya standing in no time. LOL



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Last edited by CheapBassTurd; 05-24-2012 at 06:11 AM.
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post #10 of 39 Old 05-24-2012, 09:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoneRider View Post
Physically, standing raises the center-of-gravity of the man-motorcycle assemblage.

The moment-of-inertia is altered, making the assembly more dynamically stable.

Watch a spinning ice skater; extending arms slows the rate of rotation; tucking the arms, they spin like an electric drill. Altering the moment-of-inertia produces the change.

Or, my concept of physical mechanics is flawed (quite possibly).

FULL DISCLOSURE: I have NOT mastered standing to enhance my own motorcycle-riding stability.

The concepts of inertia and angular stability are discussed more coherenty here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_of_inertia

Simple demonstration:

Have a buddy hold bike up, standing at front fork. Mount bike, sit, hands on handlebars. Have buddy shake bike side-to-side.

Then, stand on pegs, hands on handlebars, hug tank with knees. Have buddy again shake bike side-to-side.

Notide any difference in the ease of angular excursion in the two cases?
I think the simple test/exercise LoneRider calls for would demonstrate this effect much better than I could ever explain it.

I also stand corrected: standing up on the pegs does not lower the CG of the bike/rider duo. It does, in fact, raise it.

I heard a long time ago and the saying still seems to circulate in the riding world that standing up lowers your CG but it's not so.

50 years old and I still haven't grasped the concept of "you can't believe everything you hear"............



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