klr600 head cover bolt holes threaded - Kawasaki KLR 650 Forum
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post #1 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 08:59 AM Thread Starter
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klr600 head cover bolt holes threaded

Hi All,

I'm new to the forum but doing up my Q plated KLR

on my to do list-

Chain and front and rear sprocker replacement

cush drive replacement

rear brake shoes replacement

doohickey upgrde (eagle mike parts, looking at using torsion spring, any advice appreciated)

Valve shims adjusted

So when doing the Valve shims and removing the head cover I stripped one bolt hole and noticed another was already stripped, I'm looking at using a heli coil stainless steel insert to repair the threaded holes, any advice, warnings etc? they would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
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post #2 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 12:54 PM
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If you are referring to the bolts that retain the cam cover, I had to put e helicoil in one of them on my 600 when I got it. It works fine, but there is absolutely no room for error. Mess up and you may be looking for a new head.
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post #3 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 01:09 PM
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Were I in your shoes, I would just be really careful with the two remaining bolts and apply a small amount of some red RTV to the threads (just enough to hold them a little but not squeeze out when threaded down) of the stripped bolts and also around the bolt heads/rubber washers, maybe even put a light smear all the way around the gasket: might want to get a brand-new gasket depending on its condition.

I may be completely wrong, but there's just oil splashing around in there and the cover gasket seals it pretty well. There's hardly any torque on those bolts, anyway. I think the two remaining serviceable and properly-torqued bolts would do the job of securing the cover to where it wouldn't leak: the unserviceable stripped ones would just be installed to basically plug the holes.

What have you got to lose? If you do it and fire it up and it leaks, you can take another route. Even on the off chance it starts leaking in the future, that area is all readily visible and you're going to see it. Even if it happens to leak out from under the bolt heads, which I find unlikely, it's going to run down where you can see it or you'll most likely smell it.

I make no decree that this is the final and correct solution to your problem: it's just what I would try first. There may well be factors I'm wrong about or unaware of.

Are the stripped bolts the ones that thread into the cam caps or the other ones? Are they both on the same side/front/rear or are you lucky enough to have the two remaining good bolts be in a diagonal pattern?




Last edited by planalp; 06-05-2013 at 01:22 PM.
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post #4 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 01:52 PM Thread Starter
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hmmmm, it would be my first time doing anything like inserting a helicoil so no room for error sounds a bit daunting! was it dificult?

unfortunately the threaded holes are not diagonal, that would have been too lucky!

The gasket needs replacing and it was leaking already before I stripped another one! you're right the torque settings on the cover are very low, and it's very easy to to strip the bolt holes. they're the ones that go into the head rather than the cam caps.

The cover was leaking before I took the cover off and stripped another bolt and the previous owner said he had given it some instant gasketbut that didn't seem to have stopped it!

tough call this one!!

cheers for the advice, so how easy is it to get catastrophically wrong?
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post #5 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 03:42 PM
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It just takes great care. Like Planalp said, the bolts do not require a lot of torque. When tapping for the helicoil, remember that you do not have to have to have sufficient depth for the whole helicoil insert. The helicoils can be trimmed to length. Whatever the case may be, if sealer does not cure the oil leak it must be repaired. If you do have a disaster, it is possible that the head can be welded and re-tapped for the original size stud. You might check with someone who knows more about welding heads than I. Good luck whatever course you take. I think that the bike is worth fixing. I really like mine.
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post #6 of 44 Old 06-05-2013, 06:08 PM Thread Starter
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you know what? I really like mine too!

I bought it last august as a replacement bike to do a trip to Florence in Italy from London. I didn't have time to do any checks before we departed and it took me all the way there and back safe and sound, through off roading in the alps and a two day blast back from florence to paris. check out the video actually if your interested .youtube.com/embed/xWcJAYyXgGc[/url]
so already I absolutley gota get it fixed!

I think I'm gonna go down the Helicoil route as I would like the piece of mind. planning on doing another trip and would hate it to cause an issue
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post #7 of 44 Old 06-06-2013, 12:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimijlondon View Post
I think I'm gonna go down the Helicoil route as I would like the piece of mind. planning on doing another trip and would hate it to cause an issue
I hear 'ya. Considering it was leaking oil before and the two good bolts are on the left side, the RTV method might not cut it. I'm also wondering if it might be possible the cover could eventually warp a little with the 2 torqued bolts not diagonal. I have no experience with helicoil installation in such an area, but I wish you luck in getting this problem rectified!



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post #8 of 44 Old 06-06-2013, 12:33 AM
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Good thing its the right side that are stripped. The lefts are harder to get to. The trick you need to do when drilling the holes is stay as straight to the hole as possible. The same when you tap the holes. You must stay as straight as possible. WD-40 works well as a cutting/tapping fluid for aluminum. If you can, get a helper to hold a vacuum close to the drill/tap to suck up any metal bits as you drill/tap. The helicoil kit will come with some standard length inserts. Just follow the instructions and you will be fine. A Helicoil repaired aluminum hole is much stronger than a thread straight into the aluminum.
Regards....justjeff

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post #9 of 44 Old 06-07-2013, 08:35 AM Thread Starter
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cheers Jeff

will order my helicoils today
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post #10 of 44 Old 06-07-2013, 12:40 PM
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One more thing, but I don't know if it applies to the 600.

The threads in the head of my gen1 run deeper than the bolt. There are more good threads down there, but not many.

I fashioned a longer bolt using a few nuts, red loctite, and a file, that looked very much like the original, and I used that. (It's important to note that I didn't loctite the bolt into the head; I used the loctite to secure a nut partway down the bolt to tighten against the head. I'll have it apart again in about 800 miles to see how it's done.) I had to file the corners off the nuts so they'd fit through the top of the head cover.

I swear the threads was almost gone already as it gave out around 30 in-lbs; another bolt had been "repaired" by the PO, but that repair is not happy. It's some kind of insert, but the insert is stuck to the bolt, not the head. I'll see how long I can keep it, but God help me when it fails. I don't know what I'll do. Double helicoil? *shudder* If I could find someone with the skill to fill it and retap it, that'd be awesome. I didn't even know that was possible. Must be hard to get right.

I now torque those cover bolts to HALF of what Clymers says they should be. No leaks, and they haven't rattled loose yet.
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