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Funny how digital pictures don't age. Since I have new 2022 (4 days old now) I was wondering when the last time I bought my old KLR. I pulled out the old hard drive and found my 2007 KLR pictures the day I brought her home. I figured I would just post some because I bet these will bring back some memories for some people. I was just a SSgt back in the day here. This was my first "new" motorcycle and I was so proud of it. Does anyone remember how much they were back then? Here is some pictures of my awesome trunk I bought. I bolted it to the back plate and used it for 2 years. Did I mention I was broke back then ?



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2007, my favourite year.

Did I mention I was broke back then ?
My times have changed. Goldwing, Corvette, car lift, tire changer, epoxy floor .......... Join the cartel? :D
 
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I know. It's odd. ******* is a bad word, but Jap is not. What does and what does not pass through the bad world filter is strange and I'm not going to explore what other epithets based upon race, color, national origin, religion, or sex may or may not pass.

Anthony Harkins of Western Kentucky University wrote quite a treatise on 'Hillbillies, ********, Crackers and White Trash' ten years ago. One wonders if he could have written that in this day and age. He explores some of the other terms that were in common use back in the day and notes that hillbilly and ******* are relatively recent terms.

There was a big brouhaha here some months ago over the term 'Okie'. It seemed that some descendants of migrant Oklahomans took great offense ta the term, whereas people who were real migrant Oklahomans or who lived in Oklahoma were not so offended. Many were, in fact and like Merle Haggard, proud to be Okies. But I think Merle lived in Bakersfield, so he might not have known whereof he spoke...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
2007, my favourite year.



My times have changed. Goldwing, Corvette, car lift, tire changer, epoxy floor .......... Join the cartel? :D
Nope… I spent my off duty time in the education center when I deployed to Iraq. Spent 7 years earning something that should have taken 4. Hated almost every minute of it. Retired at 20 years from the Air Force and told my wife since we no longer have to move all the time things will be different. Went back to work and now I support the warfighter. Plus my kid moved out. My food bill is cheaper. :)
 

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I know. It's odd. *** is a bad word, but Jap is not. What does and what does not pass through the bad world filter is strange and I'm not going to explore what other epithets based upon race, color, national origin, religion, or sex may or may not pass.

Anthony Harkins of Western Kentucky University wrote quite a treatise on 'Hillbillies, ****, Crackers and White Trash' ten years ago. One wonders if he could have written that in this day and age. He explores some of the other terms that were in common use back in the day and notes that hillbilly and *** are relatively recent terms.

There was a big brouhaha here some months ago over the term 'Okie'. It seemed that some descendants of migrant Oklahomans took great offense ta the term, whereas people who were real migrant Oklahomans or who lived in Oklahoma were not so offended. Many were, in fact and like Merle Haggard, proud to be Okies. But I think Merle lived in Bakersfield, so he might not have known whereof he spoke...
Just surprised is all.
 

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Thank you for your service! 🇺🇸
 

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Funny how digital pictures don't age. Since I have new 2022 (4 days old now) I was wondering when the last time I bought my old KLR. I pulled out the old hard drive and found my 2007 KLR pictures the day I brought her home. I figured I would just post some because I bet these will bring back some memories for some people. I was just a SSgt back in the day here. This was my first "new" motorcycle and I was so proud of it. Does anyone remember how much they were back then? Here is some pictures of my awesome trunk I bought. I bolted it to the back plate and used it for 2 years. Did I mention I was broke back then ?



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It doesn't look like you are broke now. :)
 

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There was a big brouhaha here some months ago over the term 'Okie'. It seemed that some descendants of migrant Oklahomans took great offense ta the term, whereas people who were real migrant Oklahomans or who lived in Oklahoma were not so offended. Many were, in fact and like Merle Haggard, proud to be Okies. But I think Merle lived in Bakersfield, so he might not have known whereof he spoke...
Actually during the Great Depression/Dust Bowl, A bunch of Okies left their farms in Oklahoma and settled in the San Juaquin Valley (Bakersfield). My 98 year old Step Dad (WWII veteran) is originally from Kansas. He uses the term Okie affectionately when talking about Old School Country music. He uses the word "Jap" a lot when talking about all of the places he visited, like Okinawa, the Marshall Islands, yada yada. Not politically correct by today's standards, but a more Just, honest, principled man I have never met. :)
 

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Actually during the Great Depression/Dust Bowl, A bunch of Okies left their farms in Oklahoma and settled in the San Juaquin Valley (Bakersfield). My 98 year old Step Dad (WWII veteran) is originally from Kansas. He uses the term Okie affectionately when talking about Old School Country music. He uses the word "Jap" a lot when talking about all of the places he visited, like Okinawa, the Marshall Islands, yada yada. Not politically correct by today's standards, but a more Just, honest, principled man I have never met. :)
He sounds awesome! I love talking to the generation before me. They tell it like it is. At my work the military people hang out together. Just a bunch of 40 to 50 year old guys that talk smack and in the end..... it's just a joke. Nobody takes it personal. I have plenty more to say but it's probably best saved for talking over a beer. :) By the way google "banned Popeye cartoons". They made lots of them during the war. If they are still out there you will be amazed at what the norm was.
 

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Actually during the Great Depression/Dust Bowl, A bunch of Okies left their farms in Oklahoma and settled in the San Juaquin Valley (Bakersfield). My 98 year old Step Dad (WWII veteran) is originally from Kansas. He uses the term Okie affectionately when talking about Old School Country music. He uses the word "Jap" a lot when talking about all of the places he visited, like Okinawa, the Marshall Islands, yada yada. Not politically correct by today's standards, but a more Just, honest, principled man I have never met. :)
Yea "Grapes of Wrath" type stuff its amazing the opportunities that were available, how far things have come in one or two generations. I'm not going to quit saying Okie, my grandfather picked cotton, worked in fields, and lived in tent top shacks with dirt floors, and was migrant fruit picker ending the season in Washington picking apples, he even spent a season logging in Susanville where my oldest aunt was born, she told me about sweeping the dirt floors in the San Joaquin valley as a child, then he fought in WW2 and died young in 1955. My grandmothers father came from Oklahoma too, he got to California driving a herd of cattle from eastern New Mexico to San Diego that had been sold to the US Navy to feed the troops in France during WW1he lost his brother and the horse he as riding crossing the Rio Grande then he worked at a shipyard in Long Beach, he "retired" when he was 92 and lived to 94. If being an Okie was good enough for them it's sure good enough for me. BTW I haven't done, what those guys would have considered to be an honest days work, in well over 30 years; and I live like a Pharaoh compared to them!
 

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Yea "Grapes of Wrath" type stuff its amazing the opportunities that were available, how far things have come in one or two generations. I'm not going to quit saying Okie, my grandfather picked cotton, worked in fields, and lived in tent top shacks with dirt floors, and was migrant fruit picker ending the season in Washington picking apples, he even spent a season logging in Susanville where my oldest aunt was born, she told me about sweeping the dirt floors in the San Joaquin valley as a child, then he fought in WW2 and died young in 1955. My grandmothers father came from Oklahoma too, he got to California driving a herd of cattle from eastern New Mexico to San Diego that had been sold to the US Navy to feed the troops in France during WW1he lost his brother and the horse he as riding crossing the Rio Grande then he worked at a shipyard in Long Beach, he "retired" when he was 92 and lived to 94. If being an Okie was good enough for them it's sure good enough for me. BTW I haven't done, what those guys would have considered to be an honest days work, in well over 30 years; and I live like a Pharaoh compared to them!
Wow, that’s amazing story. Amazing he lived into his 90s. I was be happy with an 80s. Thanks for sharing that story. That’s amazing.
 
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