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OK, I am sure this has probably been discussed numerous times but, here it goes;
I just bought this 2008 KLR 650 with 9000 miles for 2500.00. I just had everything ripped off to do some winter cleaning, Doohickey mod, plug change, oil change, radiator fluid change, 22 cent mod and air box mod. When I cranked her up to check out everything, I noted that the fan didnt kick on at all, I dont expect it worked when I bought it.

I assume since I dont know squat about the KLR that this is a Gen.2 and from what I am reading, does not have a fan relay. The temp switch has two wires. I tried grounding out the fan and it does not work (would this work on a Gen. 2 anyway?) I did bypass everything and directly connected to the battery and the fan does work. Since there is not a relay, is the temp switch the issue?

Also, is there a simple thread for adding a manual switch?
 

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The fan won't come on until the temperature gauge reads almost into the red.

Fire the thing up and let it sit, idling until the temp gauge climbs up towards the red.

The fan will come on.

Do not leave the bike unattended while idling.

You don't need a manual switch. If you do need a manual switch you should fix whatever is making you think you need a manual switch.

If you still think you need a manual switch you can wire one up in parallel with the thermal switch in the bottom of the radiator, but you don't need a manual switch.
 
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If the fan motor works with a direct connection to the battery, take a peek at the fuse. Here's the page out of the Service Manual (OEM Model Years 2008-2016) with some other info. 5 and 6 got cut off in the pic, but they're Main Fuse (20A) and Battery.

 

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The Bottom of the radiator probably was not Hot Enough yet to turn the fan switch on, IMHO.

A Gen 2 temp gauge needs to go higher than a Gen 1 to activate the fan, because of the larger, more efficient radiator.
 
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[EDIT:]I overlooked Bill10's excellent and comprehensive manual extract above; quite a valid reference.

Even without the manual to guide me, I should have posted:

On a Generation 2 KLR650, SHORTING (or, JUMPING) the thermal switch terminals (ignition key ON) without consequently activating the fan means either:

1. Fan fuse blown.
2. Fan motor wiring (armature, brushes, etc.) kaput.
3. Inadequate/interrupted + 12 VDC wiring or bad ground.

Now, downstream to the thermal switch: Credible test procedure in the service manual; however--fan won't come on even with a good thermal switch if any one or more of the previously mentioned malfunctions exists.

My perception/postulation only.

[See Post # 9 below for a more comprehensive (and more accurate) discussion than this original post contained.]
 

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Grounding the thermal switch lead on a Gen 2 won't do anything instructive because it is, well, the switch. One side of the switch sees V+ and the other side sees V+ when the switch activates, sending V+ to the fan motor, otherwise it is just a connection to ground through the fan motor. You can do as the OP did, jump the connector to see if the fan operates; I expect he did that, proving that the fuse was good.

The likelihood that the motor is bad or that the switch is bad, as compared to he didn't get it hot enough to activate the switch, is rather remote.
 

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Grounding the thermal switch lead on a Gen 2 won't do anything instructive because it is, well, the switch. One side of the switch sees V+ and the other side sees V+ when the switch activates, sending V+ to the fan motor, otherwise it is just a connection to ground through the fan motor. You can do as the OP did, jump the connector to see if the fan operates; I expect he did that, proving that the fuse was good.

The likelihood that the motor is bad or that the switch is bad, as compared to he didn't get it hot enough to activate the switch, is rather remote.
I STAND CORRECTED! The Generation 2 wiring is just as you say. I inadvertently overlooked Bill10's service manual extract he posted above.

I should have said, "With the ignition key ON, SHORT (or, JUMP) the terminals to the fan switch to activate the fan."

I was totally confused by the differences between Generation 1 and Generation 2 fan wiring:

Generation 1: Fan switch + 12 VDC lead hot at all times; fan runs when ignition turned off with sufficient lower radiator coolant temperature closing thermal switch.
Generation 2: Fan switch + 12 VDC lead hot ONLY when ignition switch ON.

Generation 1: Low-amperage control voltage flows through thermal switch, activating fan relay and consequently fan motor when lower radiator coolant temperature closes thermal switch.
Generation 2: Full fan current flows through thermal switch when ignition switch ON and thermal switch closes when lower radiator coolant temperature sufficiently high.

Generation 1: Fan fuse 10 amp; protects fan relay, associated wiring.
Generation 2: Fan fuse 15 amp; protects fan motor, associated wiring.

A thousand pardons for my error!

Still, SOMEONE must disseminate misinformation on this website, no?

:)
 

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Oh, you ain't seen confusion, brother, until you've seen this:


This is a Gen 1 fan circuit built into a Gen 1 radiator (but with a Gen 2 fan!) so that it can be installed, plug 'n play, on a Gen 2 (which itself has Gen 2 circuitry but Gen 1 ignition).

Here's the circuit:


Doing wack crap like this has made me more than familiar with the fan circuit(s).
 

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Oh, you ain't seen confusion, brother, until you've seen this:

This is a Gen 1 fan circuit built into a Gen 1 radiator (but with a Gen 2 fan!) so that it can be installed, plug 'n play, on a Gen 2 (which itself has Gen 2 circuitry but Gen 1 ignition).

Doing wack crap like this has made me more than familiar with the fan circuit(s).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the advice folks! Sorry I havent responded to all the awesome advice, I have been out of town. I did look at the fan fuse under the seat before I asked the question and the fan fuse was ok. I also grounded out the plug when I pulled it from the fan switch and it did not work, obviously I didnt turn the key first, I will try that. As Tom had mentioned, I tried to let it run to get up to a higher temp. but, with the garage door open and it being cold, it was futile.
 

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Pretty much born with it. It started with bicycles, then on to Corvairs, several motorcycles, a 1970 Triumph Spitfire, several more motorcycles, yadda yadda.
 

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Looks and sounds familiar. I remember getting hit with 20Kv from a flyback transformer when I was 11 and elbow-deep in a TV.

Later in life, wondering if my ignition system was producing spark, it seemed natural to just grab the high tension lead rather than mess around with trying to jury-rig up some way to see the spark in free air.

EEEyuppp! we got spark!....
 

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Looks and sounds familiar. I remember getting hit with 20Kv from a flyback transformer when I was 11 and elbow-deep in a TV.
Did your hair stand on end like in the cartoons? haha


Later in life, wondering if my ignition system was producing spark, it seemed natural to just grab the high tension lead rather than mess around with trying to jury-rig up some way to see the spark in free air.

EEEyuppp! we got spark!....
When I've suggested that a few members manually confirm whether or not they had spark, usually while working in bright sunlight it was met with a rather cold reception by this audience.

But Tom & I can attest that one will be able to confirm spark or not!
 

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When I've suggested that a few members manually confirm whether or not they had spark, usually while working in bright sunlight it was met with a rather cold reception by this audience.

But Tom & I can attest that one will be able to confirm spark or not!
In Oklahoma, where I grew up, a crowd always gathered to watch when you started working on something. I found the best way to confirm spark and reduce the crowd was to ask for help. "HERE, GIVE ME A HAND WITH THIS WIRE."
 

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When I've suggested that a few members manually confirm whether or not they had spark, usually while working in bright sunlight it was met with a rather cold reception by this audience.

But Tom & I can attest that one will be able to confirm spark or not!
Most people fuss about quite a bit when it comes to "Do I have spark?".

One important rule when working on high-voltage electrical equipment is to keep one hand in your pocket so that a shock can't go through your heart, which is a Bad Thing™. By following this rule I have never been killed, not even once. I don't know if my hair stood on end (I couldn't see it) but I will say that being hit by a flyback will make your arm tingle real good and for quite a while. The shock from an ignition coil is nothing in comparison.

So, yeah, you can fuss about with trying to ground a spark plug to the engine, installing a spark checker, etc, and trying to see it in relatively bright light, or you can just grab the high tension lead. It ain't too bad and it doesn't last long.

I did have a really neat static timing checker for distributors, though. It was this widget that you stuck in the high tension terminal of the distributor and plugged the high tension lead into. Setting the crank to about 10°BTDC, you'd back off the distributor until the points were closed and then slowly rotate it back. A neon bulb in the widget would flash when the points opened. It was neat because you didn't have to grab the wire and was a good thing for the Corvair as I was always tuning the damn thing. I remember one evening I wasn't satisfied with the mixture and balance of the four Rochesters, so I took the exhaust manifold off and tuned it until I liked the uniformity, color, and length of the exhaust flames. Only took about 15 minutes.

The neighbors and their dogs liked that experiment...
 

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Well done Tom. Side benefit will be helping the Thermo-Bob with all that wiring. Unfortunatly, doesn't help with your KLR weight loss program. LOL Mike
 
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