Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,751 Posts
I'm not familiar with the 08' suspension but...

Upping the preload will help a great deal on the rear end, and I'm not sure, but I'd think a set of Progressive fork springs will help in the front.

If you can't get the rear to where you want it, you might need to go with an aftermarket rear shock. Most of them will spring it to your weight for no extra charge, too.

I'm far from a small rider and I went with the Progressive fork springs and Progressive rear shock. The rear shock is harsh for normal riding but when I'm playing off road it's just fine.. If I had to do it over again I would have gone with a Works Performance shock though..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,980 Posts
I have the same issue tine, I added one inch rise dog bones for the rear shock and installed progressive front springs in the front, and then took the stock spring spacers and cut them a 1/2 inch longer than the spacers that came with the progressive springs and installed them. I sit just as level as my 240 pound buddy with the exact same setup. I got the dog bones off of Ebay and the progressive front springs from www.klr650.com. Hope this helps you some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
We install the RACETECH GoldValve Cartridge Emulators kit with STRAIGHT rate springs selected for the rider's weight, in the forks.
We are developing a rear shock for the "08. that's why I bought an '08. Coming soon. In the meantime;
Preload does not make up for the wrong rate springs.
At 400# you definitely need more spring rate and damping if you want the bike to ride right.
Kent Soignier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I would think heavier springs and heavier fork oil (possibly even added oil to stiffen the "air spring").

To stiffen up the front end of my tiger, I added a heavier weight oil. With the stock springs it is fine for my weight (230). The shock on the Tiger had enough preload to get it where I wanted it.

I am a 99% street rider, so this worked for making my bike a little 'sportier.'

Physics are the same, so this could work. It is a cheaper option.

Kent's suggestion is similar to how I set up my sport bikes. Straight rate springs are how I have always done it. Never wetn with Cartridge emulators, but I have had front ends redone by KyleRacing, Thermosman Suspension, and BigValleyHonda. For my race bikes, I have been happy with the results and confident it was money well spent.

For the KLR - if being used for just fun riding, it may just be over kill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I am 6'3" 250 pds. I was very impressed with the the way my bike felt after put the 1" shorter dogbones on. Be warned it does raise up the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
2008 klr650 400 pound rider what can I do?

Tinezilla, or anyone else. Our other option for better suspension (other than custom re-valve and re-spring with RaceTech GoldValves) is this;
I have been developing shocks for the late model KLR650. and they are very good.
I have two Penske 8900e to fit 2008 and later KLR650, Normal retail for those is $615. I would fit the appropriate spring to it for your weight. And swap out alternate shock spring to your satisaction and comfort.
I am offering a group buy on these, to expire at 4pm tuesday Dec. 30th, 2008
They are each custom built, sprung for individual applications. Build time normally two wks.
Call me for price as I can't list it below the msrp.
706 253 1148
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
What is the max weight rating on the KLR?

All I know is the 1" riser made a world of difference on my 06'. But being 6'4" it also made me look normal on the bike. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
2008 klr650 400 pound rider what can I do

What is max weight? At some poundage you would completely compress the suspension, but you could still putt around on it.
Optimum rider weight with oem springs is about 160#, beyond that, there is a compromise in ride quality. Can a two or three hundred pound load be ridden around? Sure. Will it be right? No. Can you add preload? yes, but;
you don't make up for spring rate with preload.
The correct rate spring rate. lightly preloaded, will give the best ride. Everytime.
Springs don't cost that much. About $110, give or take. Plus install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I cant seem to find a spring that suits my weight. I'm 6'3" and 320 lbs. I am planning on getting progressive front springs and the eagle mike fork brace...but for the life of me I can't seem to find a new rear spring that is rated for my weight plus some extra for a pillion or my panniers loaded down for a trip. Does anyone make 10kg springs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
You're replying to an old post. Better off to start a new one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,491 Posts
You're replying to an old post. Better off to start a new one.
Not Necessarily!

I cant seem to find a spring that suits my weight. I'm 6'3" and 320 lbs. I am planning on getting progressive front springs and the eagle mike fork brace...but for the life of me I can't seem to find a new rear spring that is rated for my weight plus some extra for a pillion or my panniers loaded down for a trip. Does anyone make 10kg springs?
With that STIFF of shock spring for that kind of loading, the oem shock will be nothing more than a pogo stick! And with only the Progressive Suspension front springs in the stock front forks, they won't be upto the task either.

I'll suggest that you best contact Cogent Dynamics. Plan on $1000 minimum for proper front & rear assistance.
https://www.motocd.com/kawasaki-klr-650/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,491 Posts
My screen has "Recent Discussions" column of 10 most recent with 5 or more total postings on the RH side of screen, even if resurrected from the deepest archives.

After I check out the "Recent Dicussions", I go to the top tool bar and investigate the "NEW POSTS", to find the Brand New Threads & possibly be the Welcome Wagon or the 1st Responder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
I’m a big guy but was once a really big guy! Don’t spend a bunch of money and don’t change dog bones because you will be changing the leverage ratio on the shock, I have always (5th klr since 90) just put on a heavier top gun spring and progressive front springs, inexpensive and you can do it yourself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,346 Posts
I’m a big guy but was once a really big guy! Don’t spend a bunch of money and don’t change dog bones because you will be changing the leverage ratio on the shock, I have always (5th klr since 90) just put on a heavier top gun spring and progressive front springs, inexpensive and you can do it yourself.
And I would disagree; just putting on heavier springs overwhelms the already weak dampening making an unbalanced suspension system that "pogos" as Paul alluded to. Raising links are a better option as the shorter raising links decrease leverage on the shock, thereby increasing the effective springrate AND damping. Best solution is a good shock as the stocker is a POS emulsion unit.

My KLR suspension post:
Stock KLR suspension is 1980's tech with a damper rod fork and emulsion shock with weak damping and springrates which MAY be marginally acceptable if you weigh 160lb or less and stay on graded gravel roads at worst. 2014.5 NE and up have better spring and damping rates but are the same crappy old design.

The bandaid (cheapy) fixes are;

- many use progressive springs for the forks and heavier oil. This will help with bottoming, wallowing and brake dive but the suspension will be overly harsh and not compliant. Better than stock though. Rather than using heavier oil, I’d recommend trying an increased oil level first which reduces the “air spring” and can stiffen it up a bit without all the harshness of heavier oil…..especially on high speed damping.

- Eaglemike's raising links; these change the geometry and reduce leverage on the shock which raises the effective spring and damping rates. Hopefully you aren't short! Easy and cheap but it's a "one size fits all" deal and it doesn’t deal with the inherent quality issues with the stock shock body and emulsion design.

or

- a stiffer shock spring. While you likely need a stiffer spring to properly set sag, adding a stiffer spring exacerbates the damping issues and creates an unbalanced (oversprung and underdamped) suspension, particularly as the oil becomes contaminated.



Proper suspension fixes;

- forks: cartridge emulators from Racetech, DDC's from Cogent or Ricor Intiminators all with the proper wt springs. The DDC's are my choice because they work at least as good as the RT emulators AND have the simple install of the Ricor Valves.

- shock; a proper aftermarket decarbon shock. Available from Progressive, Cogent, Ricor, Elka, etc. Again, I think the Cogent shocks offer the best value and use top quality, made in the USA components.

While usage, budget and expectations are different for everyone, spending money on the stock shock is false economy IMO and the more you do, the less sense it makes.....better to spend the money on a decent shock. Many people have done the shock rebuild and spring only to replace it later anyway. I've yet to hear a single regret from anyone upgrading to a good shock.

2 cents,

Dave
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top