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I can only speak to my experience 5 klrs over one million miles in over 30 years riding heavily loaded bikes to Proudhoe bay, Nova Scotia, new foundland, Belize and all lower 48, I cannot speak to what people read on the internet only to personal experience. If it’s on the internet it must be true!
 

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I can only speak to my experience 5 klrs over one million miles in over 30 years riding heavily loaded bikes to Proudhoe bay, Nova Scotia, new foundland, Belize and all lower 48, I cannot speak to what people read on the internet only to personal experience. If it’s on the internet it must be true!
...and I can only speak to my experience with suspension setup for 41 bikes riding and racing offroad for the past 46 years or so as well as riding on the street since 1983......and the conversations I've had with pro racers, suspension designers and other experts in that time. I don't wanna turn this into a pissing contest, and you may be fine with a very stiff spring on a stock KLR shock but that does NOT mean it's working well. That said, we all have have different expectations, experience and budgets - If you're happy, that's good.....but I don't want others reading to get the mistaken impression that a stiff spring will solve their KLR suspension woes.....or as Paul Thede (racetech) says; "the best you've ridden is the best you know. ".

Dave
 

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While I'm on this thread, here's my standard KLR shock post:

The stock shock is a budget emulsion design without hardened internals. It also has inadequate compression damping and springrate for the majority of KLR riders. The 2014.5 and up bikes have stiffer springs and damping but still maintain the 1980 emulsion design.



The problem with the stock shock is that the combination of the soft body and emulsion design means that under hard or long term use the oil turns to a nitrogen entrained mess contaminated with aluminum wear particles (grey foamy sludge) and the damping goes to crap.



Many people put heavier springs on the stock shock and while that helps set the sag properly (which is necessary, read: Suspension and Springs ) the stiffer spring overwhelms the already weak compression damping making the shock "pogo" and the damping situation even worse…particularly as the shock degrades.



Raising links are an option if your tall enough; the shorter links decrease leverage on the shock which effectively increases both springrate and damping. You still have the quality issues with the stock shock and the effect isn't adjustable (without changing links) but it's something to try for those on a budget.



The best solution is a quality aftermarket DeCarbon shock. There are many shocks available; Progressive, Touratech, Ricor, Cogent, Elka, etc. ....they range from $379.00 to $1000.00 plus. For reference a stock Kawi shock is around $800 from the dealer. The best value IMO is Cogent's Adventure; it's a high quality shock, hardened body, DeCarbon design, deflective disk damping and an Ohlins spring. www.motocd.com



I have the full Cogent set up (DDC's and springs up front and an Adventure and Moab on the rear ) of my two Gen1's and the difference in performance and capability is massive. Easily the most drastic functional change of the 50+ mods I've done to my bikes.
 

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Or was it 200 million miles since were all lying on here! How many people prep their klr for racing! I guess that’s good experience! See ya
 

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Or was it 200 million miles since were all lying on here! How many people prep their klr for racing! I guess that’s good experience! See ya

You might be lying, but I'm not. ;-) ......so exactly what is wrong with the raising links changing the leverage on the stock shock in your expert opinion?
 

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....and I prep my KLR's for the riding I do; which in my case includes moderate single track use - you don't need to be racing to appreciate the better handling that comes with decent suspension and the mods I've done make my KLR's behave better in every condition they are ridden in.

Dave
 

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Easily the most drastic functional change of the 50+ mods I've done to my bikes.
"most drastic" ?? Maybe you'd like to reword that to say "most Impressive", Dave?

But I must say that 200,000 miles+ on 5 successive KLR650's is danged impressive in & of itself.
Ride ON, zombzuk!

My miles pale in comparison.
 

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But I must say that 200,000 miles+ on 5 successive KLR650's is danged impressive in & of itself.
Ride ON, zombzuk!
Absolutely.

.....and as I said, everyone's usage, expectation and budget are different. A simple spring swap has been satisfactory for thousands of KLR riders on a budget - what I object to is the idea that the raising links changing the leverage ratio is a bad thing or that a good aftermarket shock is a bad idea for the OP or others that have resurrected this thread. .

Dave
 

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Possible explanation for Zombzuk’s preference: remember he’s a really heavy guy. That makes a significant difference in the way the bike rides under him. The rider’s body mass, not being rigid and firmly bolted to the frame, is a second spring/damper/mass with its own suspension characteristics (the seat also is part of this secondary system). The experience of a 150-lb rider on a 400-lb bike with stiff spring and light damping would be the pogo stick that Dave described. He would get bounced around by the bike. However, a 400-lb rider atop a 400-lb bike would get a very different ride. His body mass and its inherent damping would control the bike’s movement under him.

So you both may be right for the conditions you describe. Anyway, that’s my story and I’m sticking’ to it.

However, Zombzuk, since you seem to be a long-term KLRista, you should try a shock/spring configured for your weight. It may surprise you how much better it works.
 

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Pete thanks for being rational, I’m 225 with gear and I am aware Japanese bikes really aren’t setup for that kind of weight so I understand, I have used some of the aftermarket shocks out there over the years and just don’t feel they were worth the money on the klr, on my ktm or wr they were an improvement but these are totally different bikes than a klr. I’ll let it go at that. Thanks
 

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Zombzuk: I’m 225-230 bare-assed, so a bit more than you but close enough. There are a lot of so-so aftermarket shocks out there. But good ones aren’t cheap, like most things in life. The Cogent Moab is close to $700. It’s a de carbon design and it works differently and much better than the average shock. I have a Touratech on mine and it’s equivalent to the Cogent offerings and it’s in the $1000 range depending on the type of preload adjuster. If you stay on pavement, you might not feel a lot of difference, but when you go off pavement the difference becomes more obvious. So if you want better off-road capability, you have to spend to get quality.
 

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I can see that, I really don’t use my klr off-road (to heavy) but if I did I probably would go that way, I use the ktm for that since I didn’t really have to do much to it and it’s much lighter, I use the klr for Alaska, and touring the states, they really are great bikes and it’s sad they aren’t made anymore, I think it was emissions that killed them, carbs are going to be a thing of the past very soon even on tiny motors.
 

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Please don't take this the wrong way.
The KLR is NOT designed to run with a 400lb rider. Don't forget the frame is basically bolted together with relatively small bolts. Standing on the pegs? The peg mounts won't stay on long. I'd suggest you look for a bigger more robust bike.
 

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Please don't take this the wrong way.
The KLR is NOT designed to run with a 400lb rider. Don't forget the frame is basically bolted together with relatively small bolts. Standing on the pegs? The peg mounts won't stay on long. I'd suggest you look for a bigger more robust bike.
I still think you're ok man. Look into the eagle mike subframe bolt upgrade kit if you are that worried about it. Also check out the Footpeg lowering brackets, they are probably stronger than the OEM mounts and will also make the ride more comfortable. And did you check out eagle mikes raising links? Will help tremendously from keeping the rear end sagging.




Also check out this topgun rear spring, im pretty sure its the stiffest one available for the KLR. This, along with the raising links and i think you're solid!!


Go with the black one.
 

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Please don't take this the wrong way.
The KLR is NOT designed to run with a 400lb rider. Don't forget the frame is basically bolted together with relatively small bolts. Standing on the pegs? The peg mounts won't stay on long. I'd suggest you look for a bigger more robust bike.
I still think you're ok man. Look into the eagle mike subframe bolt upgrade kit if you are that worried about it. Also check out the Footpeg lowering brackets, they are probably stronger than the OEM mounts and will also make the ride more comfortable. And did you check out eagle mikes raising links? Will help tremendously from keeping the rear end sagging.

Also check out this topgun rear spring, im pretty sure its the stiffest one available for the KLR. This, along with the raising links and i think you're solid!

Go with the black one.
PaddyD & MTKKLR, I'll suggest that you ought to check the posting dates. This a 'Resurrection' from the past.

The current inquiring mind/owner is a mere 225-230 pounds. Did you read all of the postings?
 
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