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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks for your concern. I assure you, it's misplaced.

I take it that you haven't much experience riding a motorcycle with ABS in off-road conditions.
Ya, was just a thought. I’ve heard of people being charged with disabling ABS.
I can’t say I’ve ever rode a bike with ABS at all. I can imagine the issue with it on a dirtbike. I just can’t imagine myself ever riding a 650 DS like that. Yet it is ignorant of me to presume nobody would. My bad.
 

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I have a motorcycle with both ABS and traction control. Both can be turned off with factory switches on the handlebar switch blocks. There are times when you don't want them on and it is usually under sketchy traction situations. That said, I have had both save my butt on the pavement, but that's a bike with a bit north of 100hp where wheel spin will put you on the ground as fast as an uncontrolled rear wheel brake skid. The bike is a sport-tourer with a skid plate installed.

Riding downhill on loose gravel over hardpack and applying the brakes only to have a bunch of buzzing going on while the bike speeds up ain't no fun. You may have better luck locking up the rear and letting it build up a wedge of material in front of the tire. Or you can just fall over. So is bombing down Elkhorn Road at 50 and then there's a cow. Grab a handful of brake and there's this buzzing and you begin to slow down. Truth be told, it's an open range out there and I should know better, but there are really only five beef critters and the antelope know to stay on the west side of Soda Lake lest they get shot but, yeah, cow. I missed her to the rear.

I once tried to climb the dirt side of Parkfield Grade a few days after a rainstorm had turned it to mud, but I'd forgotten to turn traction control off. Man, that was funny. It didn't help that the tires were Michelin PR2s, but once the TCS was off I made it up the hill.

I have no trouble controlling rear wheel skids on dirt or pavement and I can even manage to lock both wheels up for a bit and not fall down (did it on a bridge expansion joint entering the bridge from a sweeping right-hand turn. Good thing it was raining cats and dogs; it washed the pee away), but I'll never claim that I can outperform ABS on the pavement. I believe in it. Certain dirt conditions are a different matter.

There is such a thing as off-road ABS that permits some wheel slip when selected, but I don't think the KLR's system is that sophisticated. I should read the manual, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Yikes. I’m wondering how they actually preform, yet I doubt they have a state of the art ABS that’s ‘smart’. A switch, or some form of disabling would logical, my concern is with a user crafted switch, and only for the legal or liability aspects.
having one installed by a certified tech, might help cover your butt, and I know I’m playing devil’s advocate here. We’re not talking about a dump truck, I understand, yet give insurance companies any excuse not to pay out and they’ll take it.
maybe swapping the fuse with a blown one would be an idea if your concerned about being insured off road.
That makes me wonder what my insurance will cover while off road. I know my dirtbike and quads insurance stipulates off road only, and vice versa on my truck. I’m sure there’s a special category and all that goes with it. It’s interesting how some insurance companies will cover a vehicle on the (hard) water while ice fishing, and others don’t. Some won’t even cover you launching a boat. Yet it’s amazing how many people take $80k trucks ice fishing and don’t know if their insured.
The chances someone’s going to inspect your bike after a claim, isn’t good. Yet I’d guess that’s why Kawasaki avoided the whole ‘switch’ issue, is the legal conundrum that goes with it. I know other bikes have switches, but I wonder how they’ve covered their rears, and how it might be challenged.

I might have been a lawyer in a past life
 

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It is your bike, so there is no liability involved unless you disable the ABS and let a dorky friend go for a ride on your bike

Everybody I know disables the air pump and all that pollution stuff on their bikes because in the case of such a small single piston engine it becomes a big hindrance

I have never heard of any implications , legally or insurance wise , about it

As said before many bikes and cars come fit with a switch , and a simple warning that you must exercise good wisdom when doing so, taking the conditions you will be riding at into account

Relax and enjoy your bike, if you decide to add a switch you will be in control of your situation, other than that, you allowing someone in Thailand doing it for you, land were those bikes are assembled as we speak

I suggest you take a class on "off road" riding No pun intended Those crash courses will teach you stuff that otherwise might be learned the hard way or the long way
 

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As many here know, I've spent much of the last 46 years riding and racing offroad.......my body reminds me every morning about the hundreds of crashes I've experienced in dozens of races. I will suggest that ABS is undesirable offroad except perhaps for the most inexperienced beginner....and probably not even then. I've ridden bikes with ABS offroad and even on gravel, I found it unsettling and dangerous; like Tom, I am used to and quite capable of keeping the bike upright even with both ends locked up but grabbing a handful of brake on a downhill to get little more than a buzzing noise and some slight resistance is downright frightening.

I don't really want ABS on my bikes; they add weight and complexity and I'd turn them off as soon as I left the pavement anyhow but I also think they are ultimately a good thing on pavement......but you know the saying, "you can't teach an old dog..." and all that.

As far as usage goes; I ride my KLR's offroad extensively, including mild to moderate single track.....why? 'cause I like ta. .....and because the KLR has some strengths that aren't overshadowed by it's porkage and lack of power. Properly modded, they can be surprisingly capable offroad.....certainly not 500EXC capable but able to keep up with more modern dual sports.

I don't concern myself with liability or insurance; if I crash and get hurt, it's on me and if I wreck the bike, I fix it. ......I HAVE insurance, of course, but not collision.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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Another place I detest ABS is on a car on a racetrack. There’s a saying for cars on tracks, “if you spin, both feet in.” That means step hard on both the clutch (to disengage the drivetrain) and the brake, to lock the brakes. That way, the car will slide in a straight line until it stops. Newton’s First Law. BUT, if you have ABS, it will try to keep the wheels rolling, and when the tires regain some traction, the car shoots off in the new direction. Oh, and did I mention that ABS works when you’re rolling backwards too? Uh huh. Let your imagination conjure up the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
So I actually didn’t bother switching my deposit on to an Adventure. It’s actually a little over $2000 difference here, and while they charge $400+ for lights and $450+ for those bars, I don’t feel there worth that much. And I can’t imagine anyone want to buy my stock lights, used for anywhere near $400 when aftermarket options are around.
I can get the tank and fairing wrapped for $500 at the most. Heck I could probably buy the adventure fairing and tank for less than $2000.
Anyways, ya. They look nice, but not worth 25% of the bikes cost, more IMO. I’ll make some sliders if I have to. Hell I might give some custom crash bars a go. I’m always looking for an excuse to use my TIG.
 
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