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2022 Khaki no abs, Thermobob 2, tusk panniers gen2, modified crash bars gen2, Tusk D-flex, 16t front
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As well as my suggestion about chain slack!
Your suggestions on one of these threads months ago solved my 27mpg problem. I think with riders in the 200lbs to 250lbs range your advice is even MORE important.
 

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2022 Pearl Lava Orange
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872 Posts
My chain was too tight when I took delivery. When I replaced the rear axel nut with a self locking, I adjusted it properly. I also noticed the chain alignment was off significantly. I use a motion pro chain alignment tool and a keen eye. It did make a good bit of difference on fuel consumption. Jury's still not out on mine since I haven't put many miles on yet.
 

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There seems to be some reading comprehension problems (not here, of course, but the same question comes up on the FB groups every day) with most KLR riders! LOL; the factory recommendation is 21 front AND rear unless over 215 lbs. At that point, Kawi magically jumps up the rear to 36psi from 216 - 401lbs......of course that doesn't make a lot of sense - there is no way you need to bump the PSI by 15 at 216 lbs and then it stays the same until 401....
I will agree with Paul that you do NOT need more air in the larger rear tire unless running 2 up or heavily loaded.

I run 22-24 front and 20-22 rear with my MT21 Front, D606 rear combo for my lightly loaded, offroad centric usage. A bit less would be better offroad but I'm too lazy to air up and down all the time. I would consider adding a few psi to both ends if I was doing a longer highway jaunt. I won't drop below 18psi due to the lack of rimlocks and to avoid a pinch flat on the heavy KLR.

IMO, tire pressures alone are unlikely to be the cause of any instability unless ridiculously low and my bikes are rock stable at 75mph with knobbies at the pressures I mention with my full Cogent suspension set up properly. Mileage and tire wear can be improved a bit by running more pressure rather than less, but neither of those things concern me.

2 cents,
Dave
 

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Stock tires were pretty well balanced. Even my RMATVMC knobbies balanced out pretty darn good. Conti's balance NICE! Balance matters! Also, the guys that mount my tires have been using round stackable brass weights that actually stay on the bike for a whole week in Baja …so, I’ve got that goin for me. Which is nice!
 

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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I will try to implement them in an organized fashion, and chart the results.

I rode to work yesterday keeping it at 65mph the whole hour each way, and already mpg increased to 44 mpg.

I will increase my tire pressures and calculate again tomorrow.

Any suggestions for new tires...?
My back one is already going to need replacement soon (again PSI is probably to blame)

So far i have only commuted to work on the highway, but my intention is to get into the backcountry dirt and do some camping, so I don't want specifically street tires.

I weigh 185 and have tons of gear on: Alpinestars boots, and their Andes jacket/pants/gloves/tech air 5 vest (all add many pounds), and besides my hard side bags full of crap, and my tall VStream windshield, I usually have a lightly stuffed 60L Kelty hiking backpack with my work clothes strapped on top of my seat behind me... all sure to decrease my mpg. I know... might as well be dragging a parachute behind me ; )

Thanks again for the assistance.
 

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2022 KLR650 - Fully loaded
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640 Posts
I would recommend Shinko 705’s. I’ve burned thru countless sets of them, and they seem to be a good all-around tire at an economical price for 70% pavement, 30% off-road use.
They seem to last longer than any other tire I’ve used. Just my .02
 
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I have already posted these photos in another thread but here they are again. 369 km used 18.41 lts of fuel. Almost exactly 20km per litre.
Ride was a mixture of road and dirt. This is about 2km a litre better than a very similar ride when the bike was new ( has almost 2000km on it now)
Vehicle Car Personal luxury car Automotive design Font
Automotive tire Automotive exterior Motor vehicle Font Automotive lighting
 

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I am through 3 tanks so far so I'll chime in with what I got just in case someone's got a spread sheet going for 2022's.

1st tank 235.2 miles pumped 4.700 gallons for 50.04 mpg
2nd tank 278.1 miles pumped 4.868 gallons for 57.12 mpg
3rd tank 241.8 miles pumped 4.468 gallons for 54.11 mpg
Average 53.7 mpg.

Bike is a 2022 Adventure purchased on 12 May with 1.7 miles on the odometer. Rider weighs 210 pounds.

These tanks were all under the "break in" period so speeds rarely reached 60 mph. and it still had the factory break in oil in the crankcase.

Chain has plenty of slack. I keep the front tire at 25 psi and the rear at 35 psi. Been using strictly 87 octane. The windshield is in the lower position.

I personally think these mpg numbers will go down when I get out onto the freeway and run 75 mph. The break in period is over and the 600 mile service is complete so we'll soon see as I'm keeping a log.

I have been fortunate enough that when the fuel light starts to blink I just happen to be right by a gas station so I can pull right in and fill up. Supposedly it has a 6.1 gallon capacity. So when the gauge starts to blink I SHOULD have 1.632 gallons left inside the tank. How much of that is usable will remain a mystery. So for right now, when the gauge starts blinking I will reduce my speed to 60 mph and pretend that I will run out of gas within 50 or so miles.

Kramer test drives car on Seinfeld - YouTube

Regards, Jim.
 

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2022 Pearl Lava Orange
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Great info. My confidence with the accuracy of the fuel gauge is still lacking. I've pulled in to get fuel when the last light is flashing and I couldn't get more than 4 gallons in. A 2 gallon reserve is deceiving.
 

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2022 KLR650 - Fully loaded
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I am through 3 tanks so far so I'll chime in with what I got just in case someone's got a spread sheet going for 2022's.

1st tank 235.2 miles pumped 4.700 gallons for 50.04 mpg
2nd tank 278.1 miles pumped 4.868 gallons for 57.12 mpg
3rd tank 241.8 miles pumped 4.468 gallons for 54.11 mpg
Average 53.7 mpg.

Bike is a 2022 Adventure purchased on 12 May with 1.7 miles on the odometer. Rider weighs 210 pounds.

These tanks were all under the "break in" period so speeds rarely reached 60 mph. and it still had the factory break in oil in the crankcase.

Chain has plenty of slack. I keep the front tire at 25 psi and the rear at 35 psi. Been using strictly 87 octane. The windshield is in the lower position.

I personally think these mpg numbers will go down when I get out onto the freeway and run 75 mph. The break in period is over and the 600 mile service is complete so we'll soon see as I'm keeping a log.

I have been fortunate enough that when the fuel light starts to blink I just happen to be right by a gas station so I can pull right in and fill up. Supposedly it has a 6.1 gallon capacity. So when the gauge starts to blink I SHOULD have 1.632 gallons left inside the tank. How much of that is usable will remain a mystery. So for right now, when the gauge starts blinking I will reduce my speed to 60 mph and pretend that I will run out of gas within 50 or so miles.

Kramer test drives car on Seinfeld - YouTube

Regards, Jim.
I love that Seinfeld episode :ROFLMAO:
I’m averaging ~50mpg now that I have the tusk panniers on my bike. It used to run a consistent 55mpg. All the smog $hit has been deleted.
Your tire psi is good IMO, although I might increase the front psi a touch. Ride on!
 

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Someone of you Gen3 owners needs to carry a measured 1/2 gallon of fuel and run one of these Gen3 models until it sputters out of gas. Add the 1/2 gallon & find the nearest gas station to calculated just exactly how much usable fuel they can carry.
The Non-California models can probably be filled to the upper rim of the tank (as long as you intend to ride Immediately). The California models with the Evap charcoal can ought not be filled above the lower metal neck.
I'll suggest that might be 1.5 Qt difference.
 
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Taking a long trip for the next 10 days. Today was 530 miles all freeway running between 75 to 85 mph. Fuel economy suffered. Stopped for gas 4 times and today's average mpg is 43.93. Low was 38.26 mpg and high was 50.43.

Regards, Jim.
 

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2022 650 adventurer
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Someone of you Gen3 owners needs to carry a measured 1/2 gallon of fuel and run one of these Gen3 models until it sputters out of gas. Add the 1/2 gallon & find the nearest gas station to calculated just exactly how much usable fuel they can carry.
The Non-California models can probably be filled to the upper rim of the tank (as long as you intend to ride Immediately). The California models with the Evap charcoal can ought not be filled above the lower metal neck.
I'll suggest that might be 1.5 Qt difference.
Funny I was just thinking about doing this today. I believe ADVpulse has a write up on running the gen 3 out of fuel at around 240 miles desert riding. I’m curious to see when my gen 3 would run out, though not the same type of riding.
 

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'08 KLR
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156 Posts
That front tire air pressure isn’t helping, most recommendations will be only 2 psi difference front to rear
With the front being the higher of the two, especially for highway speed travel. That skinny little front tire doesn't have many square inches of internal surface for the air pressure to exert itself against. There's a reason that bicycle tires are sometimes inflated to over 100 psi.
 

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'08 KLR
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Taking a long trip for the next 10 days. Today was 530 miles all freeway running between 75 to 85 mph. Fuel economy suffered. Stopped for gas 4 times and today's average mpg is 43.93. Low was 38.26 mpg and high was 50.43.

Regards, Jim.
No surprise that fuel economy would suffer at sustained high speeds. Air resistance increases by the square of the speed, meaning that compared to 65 mph, going 75 requires 33% more energy and going 85 requires 71% more energy. There are other elements and variables, (primarily friction in its various forms) but at steady highway speeds on a straight level road, a sizable portion of the engine's output is committed to overcoming wind resistance.
 
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