Kawasaki KLR Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

Registered
Joined
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Decided to weigh my bike this morning. Used the bathroom scale method.

Front end tipped the scale at 200 lbs and the business end at 230 lbs

The math works out right at 430 pounds with a half tank of gas.

Yep she is a bit of a porky pig...but I still like her.

It's a 2014.5 NE aka gen 2 with the latest factory upgrade's for that time.

Pretty stock with the exception of engine guards and different bars and risers. Of course all the engine life stuff has been installed, doo-hickey, Thermo-bob, and JD jetting kit. And most importantly adios to all the smog crap.

Here ya go Restless, the pics you requested.
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive fuel system Automotive tire
Fuel tank Automotive lighting Automotive tire Vehicle Hood
 

Registered
Joined
10 Posts
Wonder how much "overlap" that creates? Like if the bike acts like a lever and applies more weight? And so I would have thought this might end up capturing more total weight this way? But google says a Gen 2 should weight 432lbs...? I know people do this often for suspension set up; to get an idea of how much front to rear weight bias, etc.

Not hat I assume you were looking for engineering accuracy with the bathroom scale!! :) LOL. I was just thinking out loud...
 

Registered
Joined
225 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As a professional pilot we would have to weigh the jet every 36 months for weight and balance purposes. Aircraft tend to gain weight over time, kinda like motorcycle and people do.

The method for weighing a jet is to put a special scale under all 3 landing gear at the same time then add up the numbers. Pretty much what I did with my bike. My digital bathroom scale is a very low profile, only about 1 inch off the ground. I doubt that small elevation difference would change the numbers more than a pound or two at the most.
 

Premium Member
Joined
4,837 Posts
Makes perfect sense; Gen2's weigh 425 - 432 lbs bone stock with a full tank of gas. Half a tank saves you 18lbs, crash bars add on 12 - 14 lbs.

....and I agree about the effect being negligible for the bike not being perfectly level.


Dave
 

Registered
Joined
10 Posts
As a professional pilot we would have to weigh the jet every 36 months for weight and balance purposes. Aircraft tend to gain weight over time, kinda like motorcycle and people do.

The method for weighing a jet is to put a special scale under all 3 landing gear at the same time then add up the numbers. Pretty much what I did with my bike. My digital bathroom scale is a very low profile, only about 1 inch off the ground. I doubt that small elevation difference would change the numbers more than a pound or two at the most.
A low profile scale changes my perception VS the 3.5"? thick bathroom scale I have! :) And I could see if you had 2 scales to do it, that would make sense! This makes me curious if I go stand on my scale with one foot on and one foot on the ground if it's going to read as 1/2 my body weight. In my head I don't think it will, but...? :)

But I'm sure your right that any discrepancy would be very minor!! :)
 

Premium Member
Joined
12,047 Posts
IDK, I can stand pretty still and my feet don't have wheels or variable air pressure?
But your legs are more flexible that a KLR's. I can stand here at the computer with my feet 12" apart & apply more or less of my body weight to either foot. The human brain will compensate with upper body mass shift. A KLR has no brain.
 

Registered
Joined
10 Posts
You are a talented man.

Yes internal air pressure does seem to vary based on my diet...Lol. 馃挬
But your legs are more flexible that a KLR's. I can stand here at the computer with my feet 12" apart & apply more or less of my body weight to either foot. The human brain will compensate with upper body mass shift. A KLR has no brain.
OK, OK. I concede that your HIGHLY scientific method of "bathroom scale" must not be questioned... :) :) :) dang
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top