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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody,

I'm new to this forum, since a couple of days I'm the owner of a KLR 250. It has been stored in someones living room for an unknown amount of time. One year ago a friend got it and stored it in a car park. Right now I'm busy to get it running again but I can't figure out why it won't start.

I would love to get some advice. I have a bit of experience in two and four stroke scooters, but now I want something faster, cooler, nicer and bigger.

When I got the bike I did a couple of things. There was some petrol left in the tank (one year old). I threw it away because it smells very bad. The tank is rusty so I use a good Yamaha (...?) tank temporarily.

I cleaned the carb and air filter, I checked the spark plug. It gives a good spark and it's clean. The electronic system seems ok, except my left front flasher, it doesn't work. The battery was dead, really dead so I replaced it. I also replaced the spark plug.

Right now I don't know were to start looking. What will be the best thing to start with?

Sven
 

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You need spark, compression, and a combustible mixture to run.

You have spark, assume compression . . . that leaves a combustible mixture.

Give it a whiff of STARTING FLUID (have fire extinguisher handy). If it runs on starting fluid, but not its on-board gasoline, disassemble, clean and adjust the carburetor. Check the starting enricher ("choke").
 

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Hello everybody,

I'm new to this forum, since a couple of days I'm the owner of a KLR 250. It has been stored in someones living room for an unknown amount of time. One year ago a friend got it and stored it in a car park. Right now I'm busy to get it running again but I can't figure out why it won't start.

I would love to get some advice. I have a bit of experience in two and four stroke scooters, but now I want something faster, cooler, nicer and bigger.

When I got the bike I did a couple of things. There was some petrol left in the tank (one year old). I threw it away because it smells very bad. The tank is rusty so I use a good Yamaha (...?) tank temporarily.

I cleaned the carb and air filter, I checked the spark plug. It gives a good spark and it's clean. The electronic system seems ok, except my left front flasher, it doesn't work. The battery was dead, really dead so I replaced it. I also replaced the spark plug.

Right now I don't know were to start looking. What will be the best thing to start with?

Sven
Hi Sven!
Welcome to the forum. I would have a look in that carb again. How far did you take it apart? Did you remove the main jet and jet holder? Are all the small passages and holes clear? Can you blow compressed air through the holes? If you don't have a compressor you can get cans of compressed "air" at electronic stores. You should also be able to see light through the holes in the main jet and jet holder. If you had the jet holder out , did the needle jet fall out of the carb without being noticed? Don't laugh, I recently purchased a 650 which the owner couldn't get running for just that reason. I have started many hard to start engines the way that Damocles suggested. Do you have starting fluid available? I have also primed the cylinder with a small amount of gas through the sparkplug hole on occasion.
Try some of these things and let us know how it turns out!
Regards....justjeff
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You need spark, compression, and a combustible mixture to run.

You have spark, assume compression . . . that leaves a combustible mixture.

Give it a whiff of STARTING FLUID (have fire extinguisher handy). If it runs on starting fluid, but not its on-board gasoline, disassemble, clean and adjust the carburetor. Check the starting enricher ("choke").
Thanks for your fast answer. I used a bit of brake cleaner as a starting fluid but unfortunately it doesn't work. (Sprayed in in the air intake)

How can I check the choke, I don't now how it works on this carburetor, I assembled it in the way it was.

The compression is good enough for running. I think I will disassemble the carburetor today to adjust it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Sven!
Welcome to the forum. I would have a look in that carb again. How far did you take it apart? Did you remove the main jet and jet holder? Are all the small passages and holes clear? Can you blow compressed air through the holes? If you don't have a compressor you can get cans of compressed "air" at electronic stores. You should also be able to see light through the holes in the main jet and jet holder. If you had the jet holder out , did the needle jet fall out of the carb without being noticed? Don't laugh, I recently purchased a 650 which the owner couldn't get running for just that reason. I have started many hard to start engines the way that Damocles suggested. Do you have starting fluid available? I have also primed the cylinder with a small amount of gas through the sparkplug hole on occasion.
Try some of these things and let us know how it turns out!
Regards....justjeff
Hi Jeff!
I took the carburetor apart as far as I could. It was all sticky, dirty and yellowish. I took a picture of all the parts after cleaning. I soaked it for a night in petrol, after that I brushed the dirt away, I used some hot water to warm up petrol (au bain-marie) and I washed every piece with it. After that I dried it, and I did use my homemade compressed air thing to make sure every little passage and hole was clean and open.



I sprayed some gas in the spark plug hole, it didn't work either. Im pretty sure I still have the needle jet, but I know that actually this little problems can drive you crazy, haha. One time I forgot to put in the main jet in a scooter carb and I was like why the *** is it not running!

I'm going to put some clothes on now and disassemble the carb to doublecheck everything!

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeahh! It finally does something. After a day of cleaning and trying I got my KLR running.
However, it only runs with the help of brake cleaner sprayed in the carburetor and when it's all burned, it stops and the fun is over.

I haven't connected the air filter yet, I'm going to do that now. Let's see what it does.

Sven
 

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Sven -

Have you checked to make sure that the carburetor is getting fuel? There should be a drain on the flat bowl that you can unscrew to be sure that fuel is there.

After sitting so long there could be some very difficult crud in the carburetor, despite the amount of cleaning you have done.

If there is fuel in the bowl, then it isn't getting up through the idle circuit which indicates it is still clogged.

T
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I checked my carburetor, and it's getting fuel.
After dinner I'll kick again and check if the spark plug is wet to make sure fuel is getting into the cylinder. If it's not, I'll consider ultrasonic cleaning.

Are there other (read less expensive) manners to clean it better?

Thanks for your help mate

Sven
 

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Seafoam is often used over here to clean a balky carburetor, but I don't think it does much good if the engine won't already run a bit.

Unfortunately, a carb that has sat idle for several years with gas in it is just going to be gunked up. The only cure is a good, old fashioned thorough cleaning.

You might consider taking it in to a shop and having it 'boiled' if they do such things over there. Short of that, it's carb cleaner and elbow grease.

willys advocates soaking carbs in PineSol - do you have PineSol over there?

T
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We don't have seafoam or PineSol over here :(

Do you mean ultrasonic cleaning with getting it boiled?

I checked the fuel drain screw again and this time only a little bit of fuel came out, it's also possible that my homemade fuel tank is not good enough for this japanese. The bottle started leaking, and I think the fuel in the carburetor got back in the bottle. Sounds a bit stupid but the original tank needs threatment.

I think I'm going to make you guys laugh:

 

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Sven -

It seems your photo hosting site requires membership or log-in to view the photo.

'Boiling' was an old term that meant immersing the carburetor in a rather caustic solution to get it cleaned out. It was done at a shop as the solution was rather nasty.

Can you buy a 2 - 4 liter container of carb cleaner that has a basket in it? One where you disassemble the carb, put the bits in the basket, and immerse the basket in the container? I'm not sure what your environmental laws are; ours have made such things pretty well obsolete and what we have is not as strong as it used to be.

Failing that, if you have mineral spirits (might be called Stoddard Solvent or somesuch over there) you might try a soak in that.

You may also find that using mono-filament fishing line to clear the passages is helpful.

T
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sven -

It seems your photo hosting site requires membership or log-in to view the photo.

'Boiling' was an old term that meant immersing the carburetor in a rather caustic solution to get it cleaned out. It was done at a shop as the solution was rather nasty.

Can you buy a 2 - 4 liter container of carb cleaner that has a basket in it? One where you disassemble the carb, put the bits in the basket, and immerse the basket in the container? I'm not sure what your environmental laws are; ours have made such things pretty well obsolete and what we have is not as strong as it used to be.

Failing that, if you have mineral spirits (might be called Stoddard Solvent or somesuch over there) you might try a soak in that.

You may also find that using mono-filament fishing line to clear the passages is helpful.

T
I think I can only buy a can of carb cleaner, containers are not sold here but Stoddard Solvent is a good idea. I'm going to check if my tank is the problem. Wish me luck!
 

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If you are not getting good flow out the bowl drain then either the supply(your tank) is the problem or the carb is plugged in the needle and seat assembly or the carb drain itself is plugged. If you pull the rubber hose off the carb you should see good flow from the hose. If you have good flow there it's back into the carb. The good news is that the motor runs when you prime it!!
Regards....justjeff
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah! Finally got it running. Sometimes it needs a shot of brake cleaner to start but after that I can keep it on. The carb, tank and the lack of love from the previous owner were the problems, and I think I have to drive it for awile to get the crap out of the cylinder.

Although it doesn't run idle for now (carb idle circuit?). And it's hard to start. There is some progress in the project and I'm very happy. I'll check the idle circuit, and the valve clearance needs some work to. I'll let you guys know.

I've another question, what is the recommended CO screw setting? I read different stories on the internet.
 

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There must be something in the Netherlands that is similar to SeaFoam. Something you can add to the gas to help clean the carb as you run the bike. If you can find such a product you ought ot give it a try.

The CO screw? Do you mean the idle adjustment? If so, the 650s usually run about 2 1/2 turns out. That should be a good starting point for the 250, I should think.

The engine needs to be running well to do a proper adjustment, as you screw it out until it just falters and then back it in a bit.

T
 

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There must be something in the Netherlands that is similar to SeaFoam. Something you can add to the gas to help clean the carb as you run the bike. If you can find such a product you ought ot give it a try.

The CO screw? Do you mean the idle adjustment? If so, the 650s usually run about 2 1/2 turns out. That should be a good starting point for the 250, I should think.

The engine needs to be running well to do a proper adjustment, as you screw it out until it just falters and then back it in a bit.

T
From 2003 KLR250 experience, I'd recommend 1.75 turns out for the starting point for adjusting the IDLE MIXTURE, or FUEL, SCREW.

More critical, IMHO, from the symptoms and conditions described, is . . . a thorough carburetor disassembly, cleaning, and adjustment.

"Better living through chemistry," pouring in some fuel-tank additive, has its limitations; expecially for gunked-up stale gasoline cases.

Industrial-strength carb cleaner; even mechanical cleaning (e.g., using wire strands to clean jets, passages, and orifices) is sometimes necessary to rehabilitate a carburetor, in my experience.

Pouring in the moral equivalent of Sea Foam does no harm; and in fact, may cure the problem with minimum fuss, muss, and bother. Otherwise, the innards of a Keihin CVK34 carburetor will soon be revealed! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi guys, sorry for being offline for a couple of days. I had to work a lot.

I adjusted the idle mixture screw, in Holland we call it CO Schroef (Screw) I think. I also adjusted the valve clearance to the right values, it resulted in a lot more compression.

Tomorrow I will go to a shop to buy some engine/carb cleaner. They don't sell seafoam or something like that here and there are no webshops who ship to Holland for less then $105.

Another thing, I broke my crappy plastic choke plunger today. Wow that things are hard to get. I found an American shops who sells the things made from aluminum for $30. I think I'll order it.

When I have time (saturday maybe) I'll get the carb off again and clean it. I think the idle circuit is still clodged.

Thanks!

Sven
 

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Whatever happened Sven?

Oh and this is my first post... I bought a 1988 KLR 250 with 10k miles on 4.20.2013
So far I have about 100 miles on it.

I love it!
 

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svenbert, if you disassemble and clean your carburetor, whatever folks in The Netherlands use to clean carburetors will work; just . . . protect the non-metal parts (e.g., diaphragm, gaskets) from the caustic solution.

Some [edit] North Americans swear by PineSol, a household cleaner . . .

If you want to see how to disassemble fully a Keihin CV carburetor, look here:

http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=19026

View these four video clips, and you'll know more about your carburetor than 90 % of KLR250 owners worldwide!
 

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svenbert, if you disassemble and clean your carburetor, whatever folks in The Netherlands use to clean carburetors will work; just . . . protect the non-metal parts (e.g., diaphragm, gaskets) from the caustic solution.

Some Americans swear by PineSol, a household cleaner . . .

If you want to see how to disassemble fully a Keihin CV carburetor, look here:

http://www.klrforum.com/showthread.php?t=19026

View these four video clips, and you'll know more about your carburetor than 90 % of KLR250 owners worldwide!
HEY!! DAMOCLES!!!
That PineSol trick is a CANADIAN invention!!! GET IT RIGHT!:canada-flag-14::canada-flag-14::canada-flag-14:
WTF....jj
 
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