Kawasaki KLR Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 97' klr650, batteries not charging.
I've done the tests as indicated on some videos. Testing the 3 yellow wires for continuity back to the stator was good, when I test them with it running, blk/yellow to ground and test yellows with positive of tester, I get no readings from all 3 yellow wires.
I understand if its bad, just curious if its common for all 3 to go at once, or could they have gone 1 at a time and i didnt know it. It seemed to be fine one day then it just quit charging.
Also, it is a new battery.
I appreciate any help
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
228 Posts
Testing the magneto - stator: Begin with battery properly charged, and then ...
1. Remove side panels and remove seat
2. Locate Regulator/Rectifier (R/R) below seat area -affixed to top side rear inner fender
3. Disconnect the 6-pin harness going to the R/R
4. Set multi-meter to AC Volts (typically 50-250v range -unless auto-ranging meter)
5. Start the KLR motor and lock throttle so that RPM = 4,000
6. Place meter leads between each of three yellow wires on the wiring harness
-So your meter is testing between Yellow-1 and Yellow-2, or Yellow-1 and Yellow-3
-Note: test the Yellow wires on the harness side NOT the R/R side since that is disconnected
7. Factory service manual says proper voltage reading between any two of the Yellow wires is 34 Volts AC

If you do this test, what were the readings?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
228 Posts
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,984 Posts
Foo is Correct. Test AC voltage output of the stator windings between Yellow to Yellow to Yellow.

A GOOD Stator has NO Continuity between Yellow & any ground, be that engine case or Blk-Yel wire. Therefore there should be No Voltage with your connection. Properly test again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
WAS PROPERLY TESTED, thank you. But im not testing for continuity with the ground wire and yellows. I think that would indicate a short somewhere. I only tested 3 yellows to each other for continuity. I want to know why i have no voltage, while its running, from the stator when I test it with neg. meter on ground wire and positive meter on any 3 of the yellow wires as indicated in the test video by Mrduhfactor.
I will perform your test Foo and let you know what i find.
Thanks. Again, any HELP is appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So testing across the 3 yellow wires at idle i had 17, 18 volt range.
At 4000 rpm I had 55 ish volt range.
When I tested the 3 yellows(+) using blk/ylw wire as ground(-) @idle, I again had no reading.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,227 Posts
There should be no voltage between the yellow wires and ground. As you have noted, any continuity between the yellow wires and ground would be a short.

The three yellow wires are one end of a three-phase alternator. The other ends are tied together only to themselves, not to ground. As the magnets in the rotor spin in close proximity to the three coils of the stator, a three-phase alternating current is produced. AC voltage will be the only thing existing in this structure, and it will be measured at the yellow wires.

The three-phase alternating current is fed into a rectifier where it is converted to a DC current. A three-phase alternator is used because it produces an AC waveform that has peaks at every 120 degrees; quite a bit of overlap. This waveform, when rectified, has a more consistent DC waveform than if a single or even two-phase alternator were used. For historical reference, interest, and generally useless knowledge, the first KLR600 alternators were two-phase.

After being rectified the DC voltage is then regulated by simply dumping excess to ground, which is why the Rectifier/Regulator gets hot during operation.

You now need to be focussing on the output of the Rectifier/Regulator and the battery. Don't rely on simply "it's a new battery". Properly charge it, measure its charged voltage, and load test it. If it floats at 12.6 or better after charging and passes a load test, you can say it is a good battery. Stick it back in the bike and, with the headlight off (remove the fuse to turn the headlight off, because KLR650 sophisticated controls), test the Rectifier/Regulator output. It should be at charging voltage. Plug the headlight back in and test the Rectifier/Regulator output. It should be at charging voltage. These two test parameters test the Rectifier/Regulator's ability to regulate under small and large loads.

This is your charging system. Read it. Know it. Live it. There will be pop quizzes.
30285
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,984 Posts
Testing the 3 yellow wires for continuity back to the stator was good, when I test them with it running, blk/yellow to ground and test yellows with positive of tester, I get no readings from all 3 yellow wires.
WAS PROPERLY TESTED, thank you. But im not testing for continuity with the ground wire and yellows. I think that would indicate a short somewhere.
That is not what you wrote earlier.

Was your meter possibly on VDC rather than VAC the first time around? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sorry I haven't responded. When I got time, I had the battery load tested...only put out 98 cca out of 150 cca. So until I can get the battery replaced, I gave up on testing anything. Thanks for the help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,046 Posts
The charging circuit in Post # 9 above, and your Harbor Freight multimeter, oughta tell you what you need to know. Service manual might have some useful test procedures.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
98 CCA may not be the advertised 150 CCA (few batteries live up to their advertised specs) but it’s more than enough. The battery is not your problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Okay. Good to know. The guy at batteries+ called it bad because of that load test.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
You mentioned at the beginning that it is a “new battery”. If it’s new enough that you can exchange it, what the heck, tell the battery place that it tested bad and exchange it for a brand new one. 😉.

Also, it’s typical for LA batteries to lose CCA and reserve capacity over time as they age. If it’s good enough to start and run the bike, it’s not related to your charging problem.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,227 Posts
Sorry I haven't responded. When I got time, I had the battery load tested...only put out 98 cca out of 150 cca. So until I can get the battery replaced, I gave up on testing anything. Thanks for the help.
What? What? What the jump the **** up and down is that about? That's not a load test. "CCA" means Cold Cranking Amps. The only way you can determine a CCA result is to put the motorcycle in a cold environment and let it cold soak for 12 hours, then apply a load to the battery (try to start it) and measure the amperage the battery will deliver to the heavy load of turning the engine over. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that whoever this guy is didn't take your KLR into a meat locker for 12 hours.

CCA is a sort of measure, commonly used, of the battery's capacity to deliver current. Delivering current at low temperatures is harder for the battery to do and, in many locales, is where you really need to have the capacity so CCA was chosen as the metric for battery capacity.

A load test is simply the application of a load, at ambient temperature (whatever the A/C was set to inside batteries+) to the battery for ~15 seconds and then measuring what voltage the battery drops to under that load. For a 200 CCA battery, a load test is considered "good" if the voltage of a fully charged (12.6V at rest, no load) battery does not drop below 10V. If it does, it indicates that the battery is weak or bad, depending on what the voltage at load is.

That's why a battery is "good" if its fully charged voltage is 12.6V (minimum) and it can maintain a prescribed voltage, based upon its capacity, under a load.

The important answer here is to the question "What was the voltage of the battery during the load test?". If it was 10V or better, then your battery passed the load test. Yay! If it was 10V or less, it didn't. Kawaisou ne.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I took the battery in at 13.5 volts he did a load test and said it only put out 98 out of 150 CCA?? In his opinion it was a bad battery.
I do agree with the previous post about replacement of the battery but I have to get with the previous owner to see if he still has the receipt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Also dont remember the Batteries+ guy saying it was less than 10v after his test...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,227 Posts
OK, I'm out. Before I go I will say that a fully charged battery wouldn't be at 13.5V for more than a few minutes before it lost its surface charge and dropped down to 12.6-12.8V. Mine will show a surface charge of 13.2V for a bit after it gets charged. I will also say that it doesn't seem like the batteries+ (what is that, anyway?) guy knows what he's talking about. He gave you a non-answer in the normal context of battery talk. Are you supposed to think that your battery has 2/3 of its normal capacity? Is that bad? Why is that bad? Logically, 2/3 of cold capacity, to @PeteK's point, could be a workable battery at shirt-sleeve temperatures. But, if the battery won't hold its voltage up under load, well, that ain't good.

Hope you get it sorted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks everyone for you help. What a fun ride that was..huh!
Turns out its just a bad battery with a weak spot.
Charges fine, holds charge, occasionally I hit the weak spot and it wont start. With a new battery..alls good. Till next time..Keep the wheels spinning and the beavers grinnin'!
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top