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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings! New member here. Big Island, Hi. Just picked up an 09 klr650 and only have a few service notes in the owners manual as a history of what has been done to it. It has 33k on the odometer with a note of engine rebuild at 18k, there are also 705 stickers on the side covers. I pulled the alternator cover off to see if the doohickey has been upgraded but realize I will need to get a special tool to pull the alternator rotor off. Question # 1- I can see the bottom of the doohickey is there any way to identify it from that alone? I will be replacing chain and sprockets with new nut and locking washer for front sprocket. I also notice that the crank case ventilation hose has no pcv valve and is directed out over the rear swing arm. The fitting at the bottom of the air box where I assume that hose should go to is just open. Question #2 - Is that a common mod or do I need to correct something? It seems important to have the vacuum of the intake drawing out the gasses. The other notes in the manual indicate regular oil changes. I have lubricated all control cables. Question # 3- Are there any other things that I should have a look at? Bike runs really smooth and solid. Thanks a bunch.
 

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I also notice that the crank case ventilation hose has no pcv valve and is directed out over the rear swing arm. The fitting at the bottom of the air box where I assume that hose should go to is just open.
There should not be any PCV valve installed onto this engine.
The crankcase vent hose Should Be connected to the nipple on the Upper LH forward corner of the clean-side air box, just above the top shock mounting bolt.
And yes, it is correct that that nipple has only about a 1/4 hole in it!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There should not be any PCV valve installed onto this engine.
The crankcase vent hose Should Be connected to the nipple on the Upper LH forward corner of the clean-side air box, just above the top shock mounting bolt.
And yes, it is correct that that nipple has only about a 1/4 hole in it!
Thanks pdwestman, that's an easy enough fix. Makes me wonder why it was done in the first place. Only thing I could think of is piston ring blow by fouling the air box but the hose has no residue on the open end.
 

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Question # 1- I can see the bottom of the doohickey is there any way to identify it from that alone?
Adding pictures to your post would help a lot.
 
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Makes me wonder why it [PCV valve implant] was done in the first place. Only thing I could think of is piston ring blow by fouling the air box but the hose has no residue on the open end.
My speculation: Once upon a time, self-anointed KLR, "gurus," decreed a PCV valve installed as found on your bike, produced GREAT gains in performance, including additional, "free," power, greater economy (as in higher fuel mileage, lower oil consumption), and enhanced maintenance (as in, improved piston ring seating). These are only a few of the benefits claimed.

Over time, the general consensus evolved, the PCV valve mod offers none of these advantages. In theory, the one-way valve produced a crankcase vacuum, responsible for the touted improvements. However, pressure measurements indicated higher-than-atmospheric pressure in the sump during engine operation in any rpm/load regime, except during rapid deceleration of rpm. The claimed crankcase vacuum, like Cold Fusion energy (outside the state of Utah), has never been detected, AFAIK.

So, your bike. Modify it, or un-modify it, as YOU like. Some, "True Believers," may still insist the PCV valve mod offers significant value. Maybe they're right! (Copernicus was right, although his concepts initially were deemed heretical and incorrect, by the Church and the state.)

DISCLAIMER: My own memory and analysis found in the above post, each fragile and often invalid.
 

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…other things;
Valve shim clearance check.
Swing arm pivot and suspension link joints ever been pulled apart and greased?
Steering head bearing free play check.
Flush F&R brake fluid. Check brake pads.
Coolant flush and replace.
Spark plug check.
Air filter clean & oil.
Check this forum for all the bolts that typically loosen and need regular re-torquing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
…other things;
Valve shim clearance check.
Swing arm pivot and suspension link joints ever been pulled apart and greased?
Steering head bearing free play check.
Flush F&R brake fluid. Check brake pads.
Coolant flush and replace.
Spark plug check.
Air filter clean & oil.
Check this forum for all the bolts that typically loosen and need regular re-torquing.
Thanks for those tips. I have ordered the stock dog bone links for the rear suspension as it has been lowered and I'm 6'3". I plan on servicing the swing arm when I replace the links , chain and sprockets. Valve check is on the list too. I will add the rest of these suggestions to my list. Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My speculation: Once upon a time, self-anointed KLR, "gurus," decreed a PCV valve installed as found on your bike, produced GREAT gains in performance, including additional, "free," power, greater economy (as in higher fuel mileage, lower oil consumption), and enhanced maintenance (as in, improved piston ring seating). These are only a few of the benefits claimed.

Over time, the general consensus evolved, the PCV valve mod offers none of these advantages. In theory, the one-way valve produced a crankcase vacuum, responsible for the touted improvements. However, pressure measurements indicated higher-than-atmospheric pressure in the sump during engine operation in any rpm/load regime, except during rapid deceleration of rpm. The claimed crankcase vacuum, like Cold Fusion energy (outside the state of Utah), has never been detected, AFAIK.

So, your bike. Modify it, or un-modify it, as YOU like. Some, "True Believers," may still insist the PCV valve mod offers significant value. Maybe they're right! (Copernicus was right, although his concepts initially were deemed heretical and incorrect, by the Church and the state.)

DISCLAIMER: My own memory and analysis found in the above post, each fragile and often invalid.
Thanks, There is no pcv valve just the hose disconnected from air box , extended, and routed to the rear swing arm area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Her are some photos of the Doohicky. Hard to get good shots so I took a few. Can anybody tell if it is stock or upgraded? I plan on ordering the special tool to remove the alternator rotor but would love to order it at the same time as the new Doohickey if it needs it. Might be able to group together an order as shipping to Hawaii is pricey. Thanks.
Automotive tire Crankset Light Tread Wheel
Light Crankset Automotive tire Bicycle part Camera lens
Hood Automotive tire Bumper Automotive exterior Rim
Automotive tire Bicycle part Crankset Rim Gear
 

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The thin, Black metal, with NO machining marks suggests that it is an OEM doo-hickey.
Are there any 'witness' marks, left of the bolt, around the top & bottom of the slot to suggest that it had Ever Been allowed to Possibly re-adjust?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The thin, Black metal, with NO machining marks suggests that it is an OEM doo-hickey.
Are there any 'witness' marks, left of the bolt, around the top & bottom of the slot to suggest that it had Ever Been allowed to Possibly re-adjust?
Hey pdwestman, Thanks for getting back. Just checked and yes there is signs on the slot edges to the left of the adjustment bolt having moved. While I was at it I loosened the adjustment bolt and did a little pry with a flat head screw driver against the slotted slide part. While I did notice a bit of spring tension left ,it was not much. I then pryed the other direction and tightened it up. Then I checked the chain tension with a little pry and it felt reasonably tight.
 

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What you can do is just make a manual adjustment. Start by setting the engine to top dead center by sighting a line that starts at the center of the rotor bolt and passes through the T on the edge of the rotor and the '5' in '651' that is cast into the bottom of the cylinder. That's pretty close to TDC. Turn the rotor counter-clockwise only.

Loosen the bolt and use a screwdriver to push the lever firmly to your left. Snug the bolt up to 70 INCH-pounds. You can keep an eye on the lever as you loosen the bolt and see if the lever moves under spring pressure. It really doesn't mean any more than that there was sufficient spring pressure this time; it says nothing about next time.

Buy two or three Tusk alternator cover gaskets and do this every 5000 to 7500 miles. The engine won't know the difference.
 
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While I did notice a bit of spring tension left ,it was not much. I then pryed the other direction and tightened it up. Then I checked the chain tension with a little pry and it felt reasonably tight.
Did you forcibly rotate the mechanism CW or CCW? I recon that I don't quite understand.
 

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When you loosen the long bolt, the attached spring should pull/swing the crescent(doohickey) counter clock wise. Towards the back of the bike. If nothing happens, your spring may be broken. Follow the above TDC rule when doing this. Doo's fracture, springs stretch and break. Post what happens. Thanks, Tom.
 

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When you loosen the long bolt, the attached spring should pull/swing the crescent(doohickey) counter clock wise. Towards the back of the bike.
YOU have got THAT Backwards. The Doo-hickey is rotated Clock-Wise to take up balancer chain slack!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry, I rotated the doohicky ccw first to see what the spring tension felt like, it seemed weak. I then rotated cw and tightened the bolt while holding pressure on it. I guess all this is moot since it looks like I will need to order the special rotor removing tool first to verify what doohicky I have. Was just hoping to verify first so I could order once and lump together shipping charges. So it looks like I will be ordering Eagle Mikes Doohicky. Is there a parts list for this job i.e. gaskets, "o" rings , tools , nuts, washers etc. that I will need to complete the task? Sorry if this is a common question from a newb, I just hate waiting for ordered parts only to find I needed another. Really appreciate all the responses and info. A round of virtual beers on me!
 

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Aftermarket doohickey implant (and, "torsion spring") remains sound maintenance, Cycleops (have 'em on my Generation 1), but . . . catastrophic collateral damage from balancer chain tensioning system failures have been reduced drastically from 2008 models forward (improved OEM eccentric shaft lever (doohickey) durability). Spring weakness can be compensated for by manual doohickey clockwise rotation (and reasonable torqueing), as Tom posts (# 13) above.

That said, Eagle Mike doohickey and "torsion spring" have superior design and manufacturing quality than OEM parts possess. If you, as Hallmark says, "care to send the very finest," aftermarket doohickey and spring appear in your future. Mandatory? Guaranteed ticking time bomb inevitable catastrophic failure with latter-day OEM parts? "Ain't necessarily so," IMHO; YMMV!

(At 33 k miles, I'd be inclined to think you're on the favorable side of Bayesian probability, regardless of your type of doohickey. But, maybe not. Maybe, fate is tempted.)
 
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