Kawasaki KLR Forum banner
21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Does the rotor holder tool have a hole on the back side to allow a socket onto the rotor bolt? Hard to see that from the photo.

I
What you can do is just make a manual adjustment. Start by setting the engine to top dead center by sighting a line that starts at the center of the rotor bolt and passes through the T on the edge of the rotor and the '5' in '651' that is cast into the bottom of the cylinder. That's pretty close to TDC. Turn the rotor counter-clockwise only.

Loosen the bolt and use a screwdriver to push the lever firmly to your left. Snug the bolt up to 70 INCH-pounds. You can keep an eye on the lever as you loosen the bolt and see if the lever moves under spring pressure. It really doesn't mean any more than that there was sufficient spring pressure this time; it says nothing about next time.

Buy two or three Tusk alternator cover gaskets and do this every 5000 to 7500 miles. The engine won't know the difference.
So I did the manual adjustment to the doohicky at TDC . Afterwards when I went to turn the crank via rotor bolt ccw it would not turn so I loosened the adjustment bolt again and the motor turned freely. I only used a thin shaft flat head screwdriver so the force was not excessive. Now I feel it would be wise to go ahead and order the EagleMike kit just to see what is going on. I thought I would go with the manual adjustment Idea but I would not feel good about how much pressure is too much or not enough. As I dig deeper into this bike I find more questions. Holy air box Batman! This is just letting in a bunch of dirt , I can't see needing that much more flow.
Motor vehicle Hood Vehicle Bumper Automotive exterior

Why drill a bunch of holes and then plug one up? Any idea what was eliminated here?
Wood Automotive tire Automotive exterior Bumper Hood

Then there is this aborted pipe coming out of the cylinder head next to the spark plug. ???
Hood Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive exterior

I am assuming this blocked off hose from the gas tank went to the charcoal canister that no longer exists.
Hood Paint Gas Electric blue Auto part

This bike had been lowered.I am 6'3" and I have new stock length links I will be installing. Looks like the side stand has been shortened. Is that correct?
Automotive tire Wood Bicycle part Gas Pipe

I know these foot pegs are aftermarket items but are the brackets OEM? Since the bike was lowered I wonder if the pegs were also raised?

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bicycle part Bicycle chain Vehicle brake

Thanks again.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,338 Posts
Does the rotor holder tool have a hole on the back side to allow a socket onto the rotor bolt? Hard to see that from the photo.
Yes.

...Holy air box Batman! This is just letting in a bunch of dirt , I can't see needing that much more flow.
That is referred to as the "L-Mod" for the hole pattern. A bit aggressive, but it's fine.

Why drill a bunch of holes and then plug one up? Any idea what was eliminated here?
That fitting is for a part of the Evap Recovery System and goes into the clean side of the airbox. It is imperative that it be closed off. You don't want dirt, grit, and dust coming into the clean side.

Then there is this aborted pipe coming out of the cylinder head next to the spark plug. ???
That is from removing the Air Injection System. A might bit crude, but effective.

I am assuming this blocked off hose from the gas tank went to the charcoal canister that no longer exists.
A part of the aforementioned Evap Recovery System

This bike had been lowered.I am 6'3" and I have new stock length links I will be installing. Looks like the side stand has been shortened. Is that correct?
Yes.

I know these foot pegs are aftermarket items but are the brackets OEM?
Yes.

Since the bike was lowered I wonder if the pegs were also raised?
The PivotPegz may raise the platform height somewhat, but the brackets have not been modified to make them taller.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,249 Posts
Holy air box Batman! This is just letting in a bunch of dirt , I can't see needing that much more flow.
Personally, I've found that the oiled foam air filter stays cleaner, longer by breathing cleaner air from under the seat than nothing but dusty air off of the rear tire, from the LH rear side panel.

I am assuming this blocked off hose from the gas tank went to the charcoal canister that no longer exists.
The Red dot nipple was the return line from the evap system. It is an open pipe inside of the tank, upper RH near fuel cap.

Actually they capped off the wrong one. If you cap off the RED dot nipple you can fill the fuel tank fuller. The Blue dot nipple actually goes to the cone shaped nipple of the gas cap air vent (which the seal is probably rotted away anyways).
Which ever nipple you choose to leave open, it should have a hose routed down alongside the shock spring, for gasoline overflow if you fill the fuel tank before you eat lunch, rather than after.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Does the rotor holder tool have a hole on the back side to allow a socket onto the rotor bolt? Hard to see that from the photo.
Yes.

...Holy air box Batman! This is just letting in a bunch of dirt , I can't see needing that much more flow.
That is referred to as the "L-Mod" for the hole pattern. A bit aggressive, but it's fine.

Why drill a bunch of holes and then plug one up? Any idea what was eliminated here?
That fitting is for a part of the Evap Recovery System and goes into the clean side of the airbox. It is imperative that it be closed off. You don't want dirt, grit, and dust coming into the clean side.

Then there is this aborted pipe coming out of the cylinder head next to the spark plug. ???
That is from removing the Air Injection System. A might bit crude, but effective.

I am assuming this blocked off hose from the gas tank went to the charcoal canister that no longer exists.
A part of the aforementioned Evap Recovery System

This bike had been lowered.I am 6'3" and I have new stock length links I will be installing. Looks like the side stand has been shortened. Is that correct?
Yes.

I know these foot pegs are aftermarket items but are the brackets OEM?
Yes.

Since the bike was lowered I wonder if the pegs were also raised?
The PivotPegz may raise the platform height somewhat, but the brackets have not been modified to make them taller.
Hey Tom, Really appreciate you answering every Question like that. Have a good night.
Personally, I've found that the oiled foam air filter stays cleaner, longer by breathing cleaner air from under the seat than nothing but dusty air off of the rear tire, from the LH rear side panel.

The Red dot nipple was the return line from the evap system. It is an open pipe inside of the tank, upper RH near fuel cap.

Actually they capped off the wrong one. If you cap off the RED dot nipple you can fill the fuel tank fuller. The Blue dot nipple actually goes to the cone shaped nipple of the gas cap air vent (which the seal is probably rotted away anyways).
Which ever nipple you choose to leave open, it should have a hose routed down alongside the shock spring, for gasoline overflow if you fill the fuel tank before you eat lunch, rather than after.
Hey pdwestman, It would be easy enough to switch the tank hoses if that's what you are recommending. Yes the other hose goes back to the swing arm to drain. Thanks for the reply.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,986 Posts
Tom and Paul have you covered. I will emphasize that the holes in the top of the airbox do NOT let in more dirt......they do let in more air though. The holes are on the "dirty side" so they are before the filter so no harm is done by adding airflow. All the mods you've noted are very common


Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Tom and Paul have you covered. I will emphasis that the holes in the top of the airbox do NOT let in more dirt......they do let in more air though. The holes are on the "dirty side" so they are before the filter so no harm is done by adding airflow. All the mods you've noted are very common


Dave
Thank you Dave.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
About that stand: I wouldn’t try to weld back in a piece of pipe to make it longer. Instead, get a wider and thicker foot that goes under the stock one. That will help keep the bike from sinking the stand into soft surfaces (and then falling over), and you can adjust the height with more washers. You don’t want the stand too high because when you swing a leg over and plop on the saddle, a too-tall stand will lever the bike over to the right, and you with it. BTDT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
About that stand: I wouldn’t try to weld back in a piece of pipe to make it longer. Instead, get a wider and thicker foot that goes under the stock one. That will help keep the bike from sinking the stand into soft surfaces (and then falling over), and you can adjust the height with more washers. You don’t want the stand too high because when you swing a leg over and plop on the saddle, a too-tall stand will lever the bike over to the right, and you with it. BTDT.
Thanks Pete, I also had the idea of swapping with someone on here who might be lowering their bike. Not ideal since both bikes will be out of commission propped up against a wall. I have a wire feed welder so will most likely go that route. Looks like I have exactly 11" from front of foot to the to the center of the bolt head. Pete , is yours stock length? Mind throwing a tape measure on it whenever is convenient so I have a reference point? I'm guessing an inch was cut out cause that is what the front and rear were lowered by. Cheers

Automotive tire Gas Automotive wheel system Drink Cylinder


Tape measure Ruler Office ruler Tool Measuring instrument
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
…other things;
Valve shim clearance check.
Swing arm pivot and suspension link joints ever been pulled apart and greased?
Steering head bearing free play check.
Flush F&R brake fluid. Check brake pads.
Coolant flush and replace.
Spark plug check.
Air filter clean & oil.
Check this forum for all the bolts that typically loosen and need regular re-torquing.
MVMike-Why would the brake fluid need replacing? If the answer is water contamination, how does water get in a sealed system?
I see the fluid change recommendation on numerous forums and dealer websites.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
MVMike-Why would the brake fluid need replacing? If the answer is water contamination, how does water get in a sealed system?
I see the fluid change recommendation on numerous forums and dealer websites.
Hi Bob. Since brake fluid is hygroscopic it sucks moisture from anywhere it can. Even an open container on your garage shelf can get moisture from the air in the bottle. After 6 bikes with hydraulic brakes and 10 cars/trucks I’ve never had to change brake fluid until my KLR. My new to me 2014 had 4300mi and had never been offroad. On my first KLR offroad adventure over a local Mtn I lost the rear brake completely when the fluid boiled coming down the backside. Something that had never happened on any offroad bike of mine before. After some research here and other places I found it’s a known KLR issue. Specially with the rear. I flushed the honey colored fluid and replaced with better fluid. I’m keeping an eye on the rear fluid but it’s been fine on the same ride twice since then.
 

·
Premium Member
2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
Joined
·
1,479 Posts
As noted above, glycol brake fluid absorbs water. The brake system isn’t complete sealed, so if you live in a humid environment, change it at least every two years. If a dry environment like the Southwest, you can stretch that to four years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Aloha Cyclops! (I'm moving back to the Islands for the third and final time in March 2024.) The 2008-2009 models had an issue with using oil - mine needed oil at every gas fill up. I believe the issue was the piston oil ring. A lot of guys went to a bigger-bore kit as long as they were that deep in the motor to replace the ring - hence the 705(cc) label. It looks like the forum has done a pretty good job of identifying things to look at. Here are a couple of things I learned the hard way. Inevitably the exhaust-to-head, and header-to-muffler hardware will become loose causing popping on deceleration in the first case, and a hole melted in the airbox in the second. Other items to Loctite and torque are the foot peg mounting bolts and subframe bolts. Check the fork oil levels and condition, and then clean, lube and adjust the rear shock components. Fresh fluids and filters make for a nice starting off point for future maintenance. I'm sure you know to check chain, sprockets and brake shoes. If your tires are good, you should be ready to go play. I've had three Gen 1's, 2 early Gen 2's and now ride a 2015. I have to tell you that the stiffer suspension and WAY BETTER SEAT on the 2015 make living with the KLR even better. KLR650 - No Ka Oi, brah!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Aloha Cyclops! (I'm moving back to the Islands for the third and final time in March 2024.) The 2008-2009 models had an issue with using oil - mine needed oil at every gas fill up. I believe the issue was the piston oil ring. A lot of guys went to a bigger-bore kit as long as they were that deep in the motor to replace the ring - hence the 705(cc) label. It looks like the forum has done a pretty good job of identifying things to look at. Here are a couple of things I learned the hard way. Inevitably the exhaust-to-head, and header-to-muffler hardware will become loose causing popping on deceleration in the first case, and a hole melted in the airbox in the second. Other items to Loctite and torque are the foot peg mounting bolts and subframe bolts. Check the fork oil levels and condition, and then clean, lube and adjust the rear shock components. Fresh fluids and filters make for a nice starting off point for future maintenance. I'm sure you know to check chain, sprockets and brake shoes. If your tires are good, you should be ready to go play. I've had three Gen 1's, 2 early Gen 2's and now ride a 2015. I have to tell you that the stiffer suspension and WAY BETTER SEAT on the 2015 make living with the KLR even better. KLR650 - No Ka Oi, brah!
Hey Simplafi, Thanks for the tips. The exhaust is a stainless FMF unit, I will check the torque on those bolts. Looks like it has the aftermarket drill through sub frame bolts upgrade. I have all new sprockets and chain, air filter , oil filter. Replaced the rear suspension links and lubed everything in the rear. It has a Sargent seat which is pretty cozy. I will be checking valve clearances and the front suspension also. I ended up buying a doohicky kit from Eaglemike since I needed the tools to see if it was already modified, it was so I just put the new parts on anyway. It also has a thermo bob. Looking forward to taking this up Mouna Kea, not sure how it will run at 14k altitude. We are expecting a blizzard with maybe 12" of snow up there tonight. What island are you moving to? Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hey Simplafi, Thanks for the tips. The exhaust is a stainless FMF unit, I will check the torque on those bolts. Looks like it has the aftermarket drill through sub frame bolts upgrade. I have all new sprockets and chain, air filter , oil filter. Replaced the rear suspension links and lubed everything in the rear. It has a Sargent seat which is pretty cozy. I will be checking valve clearances and the front suspension also. I ended up buying a doohicky kit from Eaglemike since I needed the tools to see if it was already modified, it was so I just put the new parts on anyway. It also has a thermo bob. Looking forward to taking this up Mouna Kea, not sure how it will run at 14k altitude. We are expecting a blizzard with maybe 12" of snow up there tonight. What island are you moving to? Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I saw that (and 100mph winds) on the "Big Island Now"- news app. I was on Oahu 1964-68, 1976-80, and go back every year. I will be retiring on the Big Island, March 2024 (815 days from now...if I was counting LOL). Let's stay in touch.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top