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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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I took this picture last Friday, doing Section 1 of the WABDR. That is Mt. Adams (12,281 ft), viewed from Takhlakh Lake. The second picture is from an overlook on WA Highway 14, looking into the Columbia Gorge, on my return trip.
 

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NorCal has been unseasonably hot lately, 113dF on Saturday so for some exercise today I headed to higher elevations.

Stopped to soak the shirt and bandanna at road side spring -Hiway 49 above Sierra City -about 5,000 ft.


Beckworth complex fire had briefly jumped Hiway 395 (closed for couple hours) but massive response of CalFire and the crews was kicking ass.


Headed back home, clearing Yuba Pass and finally some temps below 100dF.


Rolled up 460 miles for the day -had to break in fresh DID X-ring chain and a new set of Shinkos.
RIder went through about 80 oz water and another 2 qts gatoraid.
Barbie used no oil and odo is now at 14,600 miles.

I don't ride nearly enough. :cool:
 

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Rolled up 460 miles for the day -had to break in fresh DID X-ring chain and a new set of Shinkos.
Sounds like a good ride, Foo.

Now I have a question. Did you put that rear tire on in THAT direction, on Purpose?
There are 2 arrows on the sidewalls of those Shinkos and I feel that Shinko got them both correct.
 
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Ummm ... was just testing a new technique - before I go back and practice my correct tire mounting procedures. :)

Thanks for pointing that out, I was in a bit of hurry to get sh.t done. This one has yet to see gravel, on the ride I found virtually every gravel forest road shortcut was blocked by Sheriff or Fire Crews with the big Road Closed signage.

One saving grace - Shinko tires and Ru-Glide make for quick work.

NOTE:
Front tire went on proper and I used the Bridgestone Ultra Heavy tube.
But OMG - the turn in torque for 2lbs of intertube is huge!
I will save the UHD tubes for the dirt-worthy scooter.
 
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I'd never really considered the higher speed turning effort required by the extra rotating weight in a 21" tire assembly.

I've never used Heavy Duty tubes in my personal bikes.
The rear flat that I got last year on my '89 KX500 in the Rocky Mountains above town was caused by a tree branch stub about as big as my pinky finger & also pierced against the wheel rim.

The offending object only has to be long enough & sharp enough. An HD tube will still be FLAT.
 

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Maybe im getting old butt that Barbi Edition KLR is loooking better and better every decade.

Cant seem to ride anywhere else this summer, weird.

30224


Being 62 means i get half price parking now at the beach during peak times....nxt up is the senior discount at Denny's...lol
 

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I suspect that you just 'appreciate the scenery' at the beach. :) Many "Barbie's"?
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Maybe im getting old butt that Barbi Edition KLR is loooking better and better every decade.

Cant seem to ride anywhere else this summer, weird.

View attachment 30224

Being 62 means i get half price parking now at the beach during peak times....nxt up is the senior discount at Denny's...lol
Don’t forget to pick up your AARP card.
 

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I like to send AARPs stuff back blank to them in their own pre paid envelops so they have to pay for the return too...lol
 

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well . . . . Now for something completely different . . . . . My Gen1 A16 (2002) still runs like a top. but a quirky item in recent years has been the Gen1 kickstand. If you have ever examined one, the design where it attaches is basically a fork. the two parts of the fork slide over a flat with a bolt hole in it to serve as the pivot point. in time the fork wears and spreads, allowing the bike to lean over more and more, putting more and more load on the stand. I pulled mine off and gave the fork a squeeze with a vice and it did snug it up a bit. Thus, for a while it sags less and holds the bike more upright - as though the stand is longer. Well, my old hips require me to step on the left peg and swing my right leg over the seat to mount the bike. This does mean a substantial load on the kickstand, and sure enough it has been getting saggy again. I dont want to keep re-squeezing the fork as it has to be fatiguing the metal and would eventually snap one of the tangs. (I read about someone snapping one on the forum here) So instead of squeezing the fork again I began to research longer stands, adjustable stands, etc but found no real solutions available for Gen1. Most for Gen2 are for shortening the stand when short people want the bike lowered. (w/ lowering links etc) Kickstand pads which keep it from sinking into soft asphalt or gravel are available too. One of these pads mounted with drilling a couple holes into the foot of the stand. The more I pondered the more simple the idea got. "BRILLIANT" In the garage I have been letting the bike sit on a small 2x4 block under the foot of the kickstand which lets the bike sit more straight up and load the stand less. Like most all Minnesota parents who brought up kids, I pulled a puck out of the bucket in the corner of the garage. The thickness of the hockey puck was just under the 2x4 thickness which made it about perfect for the right amount of lean on the bike for mounting / dismounting. and obviously the puck diameter serves as a nice size to prevent the foot from sinking into asphalt or gravel. I realize I dont always have a crushed beer can to toss under the foot of the stand . . . (actually I probably do), but reaching down to pick up the can is virtually impossible and leaving it behind is blatant littering not to say slobbish and would give KLR riders a bad name.

Found Approximately 3/16 drill bit, maybe 7/32, which was the toughest part of the project (use a new bit and plan on punishing it) Obviously, the rubber hockey puck drills easily. I would make the hole smaller iin the puck so the bolt threads tightly into the rubber. (depends of bolt diameter) One washer, and a nut. You can use whatever length you like, you can cut the bolt short if you like . . . . After a field test I actually like the bolt length to easily catch it with your boot when you want to kick it up for riding. The puck is a nice size serving as a larger pad under the foot of the stand, good for gravel or asphalt. On the Gen1 there was plenty of clearance between the puck and the swing arm. Eventually this kit will sell on Amazon for $14.99 and be called "KLR650 kick stand puck" "when its time to park the bike, the puck stops here", (Comes with puck, bolt, nut, washer) also available will the the "replacement puck kit" for maintaining / replacing worn pucks, sells for $8.99 (contents - 1 puck plus stickers)

Investers wanted . . . . . . . Line6


y
30240
 

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If you have ever examined one, the design where it attaches is basically a fork. the two parts of the fork slide over a flat with a bolt hole in it to serve as the pivot point. in time the fork wears and spreads, allowing the bike to lean over more and more, putting more and more load on the stand. I pulled mine off and gave the fork a squeeze with a vice and it did snug it up a bit.
I wonder if your stand is missing the appropriate 'Shouldered bolt' and the lock nut on the back side?

Most people forget to lube them, which drastically increases the wear rate.
The Gen 1 front mounted spring is kinder to an un-lubed pivot than the Gen 2 rear mounted spring.
 
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