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Discussion Starter #1
Is re-jetting the carburetor on my KLR 250 a prerequisite to installing a slip on muffler? I'm very interested in one but if I have to pay to have the carburetor re-jetted I don't believe I'll be going through with it, the airbox is stock and will stay that way, BTW..

Thanks much.
 

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Is re-jetting the carburetor on my KLR 250 a prerequisite to installing a slip on muffler? I'm very interested in one but if I have to pay to have the carburetor re-jetted I don't believe I'll be going through with it, the airbox is stock and will stay that way, BTW..

Thanks much.
Yes, and--your bike, but why the aftermarket muffler? Want to make obnoxious noise?

Understand you can afford the muffler but not the jetting. Jets only cost a few dollars, replacement relatively simple if you want to do it yourself,
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, and--your bike, but why the aftermarket muffler? Want to make obnoxious noise?

Understand you can afford the muffler but not the jetting. Jets only cost a few dollars, replacement relatively simple if you want to do it yourself,
As far as I'm concerned, when your OEM exhaust is so quiet that you could almost forget it is equipped with an internal combustion engine, that's a problem. Not to mention, I don't know about you, but I like to rev match my downshifts and a more free flowing exhaust can increase throttle response which does what? yep, you got it, makes rev matching an easier affair, the OEM exhaust creates far too much back pressure for my liking.

So why is jetting required? is the engine that lean? from factory?
 

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As far as I'm concerned, when your OEM exhaust is so quiet that you could almost forget it is equipped with an internal combustion engine, that's a problem. Not to mention, I don't know about you, but I like to rev match my downshifts and a more free flowing exhaust can increase throttle response which does what? yep, you got it, makes rev matching an easier affair, the OEM exhaust creates far too much back pressure for my liking.

So why is jetting required? is the engine that lean? from factory?
Not trying to put you down or blow you off, Discotrash, but . . . instead of "saving lives," loud mufflers close trails. IMHO.

"Free flowing exhaust?"

"Increase throttle response?"

"Too much back pressure for my linking?"

Discotrash, your meaning of these phrases would be necessary for a meaningful discussion of the relationship between the exhaust system and carburetor jetting.

Please disregard my previous post on this thread.

Haven't looked, but bet Googling "carburetor jetting" reveals an article or two on the subject. "Care and feeding of the CVK40" explains how the jets work in your carburetor.

You don't "need" a muffler at all, if you just want to make noise. I believe you'll offend more greatly from noise pollution than you are offended by your KLR250's quietness. Yet, your call, do what you must.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The Delkevic slip-on I had on my GSF600 improved the throttle response greatly without any modification to the carb, and they run lean from factory, I'll see how it feels without re-jetting and go from there.
 

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Lean from the factory? Your pipe will make it more fuel-lean.

Enjoy that "improved throttle response." While it lasts.
I know it will make it more lean, that's what I was getting at ... 0_o

Anywho, I put 13,xxx miles on the Bandit with my non-jetted carb and aftermarket muffler and mid-pipe and never had a problem, as said, it actually rode better than with the highly restrictive exhaust, it may work the same with the KLR 250, I'll find out nonetheless, if it acts funny I will of course have the carb re-jetted.

Also, bear in mind, my airbox and filter element will be remaining OEM.
 
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