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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
It's all seat-of-pants dyno stuff, but some oils seem to be very sticky and stay tacky longer and others seem to be a bit more "wishful" in their use. I should have said "choice of oil, and a proper application" because a wool sock properly soaked in vegetable oil is probably more effective than a proper filter with a shite coating of even the best filter oil.

I've been using the Maxima FAB1 oil that comes bundled with filter cleaning spray (can also be bought on its own). It goes on a bluish color so you can see how evenly you have it applied. Seems to stay put also instead of pooling at the bottom of the filter. Bel-Ray has been good too.

Honestly a regular cleaning and proper application of any oil is going to make the biggest difference for any bike.
Excellent Camo, thank you.
 

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OK, Colton, you've got me intrigued. Please tell me about the differences you have noted in filter oils! Thanks.
Real filter oil has a "tackifier" added which traps more dirt and also keeps the oil from migrating down to the bottom of the filter over time. People like Paul have proven that the stock filter with regular old engine oil is adequate but I'd submit that filter oil is better and as Paul also mentioned, the coarser the foam, the more prudent it is to use filter oil. I typically use Bel-Ray......sometimes PJ1. I also use white lithium grease on the lip to make sure the filter seals and so I have a visual path of any dirt getting around the filter. I used to keep up to 3 racebikes running in extreme conditions and this has worked for me for 30+ years....

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Real filter oil has a "tackifier" added which traps more dirt and also keeps the oil from migrating down to the bottom of the filter over time. People like Paul have proven that the stock filter with regular old engine oil is adequate but I'd submit that filter oil is better and as Paul also mentioned, the coarser the foam, the more prudent it is to use filter oil. I typically use Bel-Ray......sometimes PJ1. I also use white lithium grease on the lip to make sure the filter seals and so I have a visual path of any dirt getting around the filter. I used to keep up to 3 racebikes running in extreme conditions and this has worked for me for 30+ years....

Dave
Thanks DP. Overall, it seems quite difficult to refute what appears to be sound logic and proven experience. One question though: does the "tackifier" (which one would assume provides great ability to trap particulates from entering the engine) also make the filter really hard to clean, actually trapping particles in the foam's cells? Thanks.
 

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Thanks DP. Overall, it seems quite difficult to refute what appears to be sound logic and proven experience. One question though: does the "tackifier" (which one would assume provides great ability to trap particulates from entering the engine) also make the filter really hard to clean, actually trapping particles in the foam's cells? Thanks.
Nope, no harder than any other oil. After a bad experience switching to water based NoToil, I use the same procedure I always have; wash and rinse in gasoline, allow it to dry and apply foam filter oil by squeezing to ensure complete and adequate coverage. Kerosene would work too (and is what kawi recommends IIRC) but I always have gasoline handy.

Dave
 

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One question though: does the "tackifier" (which one would assume provides great ability to trap particulates from entering the engine) also make the filter really hard to clean, actually trapping particles in the foam's cells?
After a solvent wash or even 2, I (all most always) wash the foam filters in warm soapy (dish or laundry soaps) water, then rinse twice (with clear water).
(The Filter MUST Then Be Allowed to 100% air dry, before re-oiling.)

I have had some foam air filters that may have been subjected to muddy water intrusion that one could see darkened areas (in light colored foams) that were difficult to wash out.

90W gear oils are also a pretty good foam air filter oil, Honda used to Recommend it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Nope, no harder than any other oil. After a bad experience switching to water based NoToil, I use the same procedure I always have; wash and rinse in gasoline, allow it to dry and apply foam filter oil by squeezing to ensure complete and adequate coverage. (Kerosene would work too ) and is what kawi recommends IIRC) but I always have gasoline handy.

Dave
After a solvent wash or even 2, I (all most always) wash the foam filters in warm soapy (dish or laundry soaps) water, then rinse twice.
I have had some foam air filters that may have been subjected to muddy water intrusion that one could see darkened areas (in light colored foams) that were difficult to wash out.

90W gear oils are also a pretty good foam air filter oil, Honda used to Recommend it!
Thank you folks. A few random thoughts / observations:

DP, the manual recommends a "high flash point solvent" so Kero would be OK. Interestingly, the manual does not state anything about allowing the filter to dry, which seems a bit odd. Probably as a caution and more so to distance themselves from liability and subsequent litigation, the manual states "do not use gasoline or low flash point solvents to clean the element".

DP and PD, there is a torque spec of 2.5 Nm / 22 in lb for the wing bolt that tightens over the filter. I have 3 torque wrenches, but torquing a wing bolt??? :unsure:

PD, does the soapy water after drying prevent oil from penetrating evenly? I know that this technique is used, but I wonder if there is a downside.
 

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Thank you folks. A few random thoughts / observations:

DP, the manual recommends a "high flash point solvent" so Kero would be OK. Interestingly, the manual does not state anything about allowing the filter to dry, which seems a bit odd. Probably as a caution and more so to distance themselves from liability and subsequent litigation, the manual states "do not use gasoline or low flash point solvents to clean the element".

DP and PD, there is a torque spec of 2.5 Nm / 22 in lb for the wing bolt that tightens over the filter. I have 3 torque wrenches, but torquing a wing bolt??? :unsure:

PD, does the soapy water after drying prevent oil from penetrating evenly? I know that this technique is used, but I wonder if there is a downside.
Yeah, the note about gas is a CYA thing but still, just because i do it doesn't make it the best way - in fact, Paul's method is better but I'm lazy and when doing 3-4 dirtbikes (sometimes trackside), I didn't/don't have the time or patience to do the soap and water thing following the solvent wash.......I do, however wash them in gas several times, with fresh gas each time and by the time I'm done, there isn't anything left in the filter.

.....don't torque the wing nut, tight with two fingers is fine.

I don't pretend to speak for Paul, but I'm sure he rinses the soap out completely. The only downside I can see is the additional step and time because the filter would have to be 100% dry for the filter oil to work it's way in properly.

Dave
 

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PD, does the soapy water after drying prevent oil from penetrating evenly? I know that this technique is used, but I wonder if there is a downside.
I don't pretend to speak for Paul, but I'm sure he rinses the soap out completely. The only downside I can see is the additional step and time because the filter would have to be 100% dry for the filter oil to work it's way in properly.
I've Edited my posting a little bit. And I did previously say "rinse twice".

And yes, the air filter must be 100% dry of moisture before re-oiling, otherwise any damp areas Will Not absorb Any Oil!

In my business, I have seen numerous burned foam air filters and plastic mounting cages (usually on atv's) because of owners Leaving Too Much gasoline in the foams before they re-oil them and immediately re-install & return to service.
It happens because of a simple back-fire 'cough' thru the intake valves, because of the rich mixture of evaporating gas.
At least two of those units apparently continued to RUN while their air filters were burning from the inside-out.
The evidence of that was the found clear up to the Plastic CV throttle slides which the lower edges were slightly melted!
 
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Never mind all this chapter and verse about WHICH air filter, and WHICH solvent, and WHICH filter oil, and HOW to perform air filter maintenance. Unless . . . we're riding competitive moto-cross or trying for the World Land Speed Record. Just bolt on a velocity stack (as I do) and RIDE!

DISCLAIMER: Not really! In truth I use the pedestrian, ordinary, garden-variety, OEM Kawasaki air filters. I know, I know: NOT optimum filtration, relentless engine abuse. GUILTY, your honor!

:)
 

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I've Edited my posting a little bit. And I did previously say "rinse twice".

And yes, the air filter must be 100% dry of moisture before re-oiling, otherwise any damp areas Will Not absorb Any Oil!

In my business, I have seen numerous burned foam air filters and plastic mounting cages (usually on atv's) because of owners Leaving Too Much gasoline in the foams before they re-oil them and immediately re-install & return to service.
It happens because of a simple back-fire 'cough' thru the intake valves, because of the rich mixture of evaporating gas.
At least two of those units apparently continued to RUN while their air filters were burning from the inside-out.
The evidence of that was the found clear up to the Plastic CV throttle slides which the lower edges were slightly melted!
Yep, I've seen it too.....people that don't let them dry...
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Yeah, the note about gas is a CYA thing but still, just because i do it doesn't make it the best way - in fact, Paul's method is better but I'm lazy and when doing 3-4 dirtbikes (sometimes trackside), I didn't/don't have the time or patience to do the soap and water thing following the solvent wash.......I do, however wash them in gas several times, with fresh gas each time and by the time I'm done, there isn't anything left in the filter.

.....don't torque the wing nut, tight with two fingers is fine.

I don't pretend to speak for Paul, but I'm sure he rinses the soap out completely. The only downside I can see is the additional step and time because the filter would have to be 100% dry for the filter oil to work it's way in properly.

Dave
DP, truth be told, I wouldn't have the faintest idea how to torque a wing bolt!... 😳
 

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how to torque a wing bolt!
Sure you do, "with two fingers". Actually it would be a finger & a thumb. ;)
We just Can't Measure how much torque we are applying. :) Just snug it!
 
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Not to hijack, it's been 2 years since Gomotor has been here. Miss his input. Anyone know why?

Mike
Me too....I scoured his posts a while back for a clue but came up with nothing....
His friend/riding buddy Gary, out of Oklahoma called me a while back (month or so back) because they had been talking about their trips.
Gary suggested that I might send him a text and possibly get a call back, which I have put off too long.
Gary said he is doing pretty well for his age & is still riding locally near Houston TX.

I just sent him a text, with pic from this screen. I'll see if he responds. 'Tis the season, ya' know.
 

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After a solvent wash or even 2, I (all most always) wash the foam filters in warm soapy (dish or laundry soaps) water, then rinse twice (with clear water).
(The Filter MUST Then Be Allowed to 100% air dry, before re-oiling.)
I always wash my filter in kerosene first, then wash it a couple of times in warm soapy water. I then gently squish the filter dry with a hand towel, then another hand towel.

If it is a sunny day, I like to put the filter in a pillow slip. I tie a knot in the pillow slip and hang it on the clothes line to dry.
I took one member's advice, and bought a second filter. Having a second filter really takes the urgency out of getting the filter dry.

I have only ever used OEM filters. One member has pointed out a couple of times that more air flow means bigger holes in the filter. Therefore, larger particles can get through the holes. This seems to make sense to me.

Cheers

Timberfoot
 

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No UNI for me...after I found massive amounts of talcum powder in the carburetor inlet of my previous 2018 KLR shortly after installing.
OEM filter has been excellent, with the snorkel removed.
 

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No UNI for me...after I found massive amounts of talcum powder in the carburetor inlet of my previous 2018 KLR shortly after installing.
Which air filter OIL did you use IN your brand new Uni-Filter before you installed it?
 

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Which air filter OIL did you use IN your brand new Uni-Filter before you installed it?
I used Uni filter oil very liberally on the filter. If you hold a clean Uni up to light, you can see thru it (n).
I don’t use anything other than an OEM filter on all my machines, but I’m very picky when it comes to maintenance and doing things a certain way….especially when it comes to rebuilding engines.
 

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OEM, or aftermarket, air filter?

Just wonderin' . . . What's the premise? Kawasaki engineers designed and specified an inadequate air filter (incapable of sufficiently fine particle filtration, yet, restrictive or tons of, "free," power), inevitably destroying KLR650 engines long before their possible and available service life?

Are aftermarket air filters the SALVATION KLR650s want and need?

OK, doohickeys, especially of Generation 1 vintage, were systemic ****** [ah, the ever-alert website automatic text-monitoring mechanism has, "xxxed out," a word, synomynous to, "gaps," in this context, but not bigoted/racist as the auto-checker may think] in the armor of KLR650 reliability and durability. Air filters? Maybe not so much.

Still, ain't nothin' wrong with installing an aftermarket air filter fulfilling a KLR owner's preferences and performance expectations. If an aftermarket air filter promises reliability, durability, and performance improvement, go for it!
 
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