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Discussion Starter #1
Here's a comparison of the Kawasaki thermo switch and the alternate, a Yamaha part that fits Grizzlys, Kodiaks, and Wolverines. Physically they are interchangeable. The brown one is the Kawasaki part that sells for $109.10 at Partzilla. The blue one is the Yamaha part and it costs $25.90 at Partzilla. I think I paid $11 for this one, used and found in the bay.

This was the test set-up. Obviously, this was a rock-solid high-speed-racing pro set-up and nothing could ever go wrong. I mean, what is the worst that could happen? The Shop of Horrors is a top-notch, high-end laboratory. And before you say it, no that isn't cardboard. It's sheet metal.
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The results:
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I don't know what the Yamaha specs are. Perhaps someone has access to a Kodiak or Grizzly manual and could look it up. The part is in use after 2002, I believe.

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Good work on exploring these options, Tom!
 
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It wasn't me, it was that Canadanian fella who goes by the handle of @DPelletier.

It took me 5 years to look into it. This is referred to as "working at the speed of Tom". I scrounged up the part a long time ago, though. I get credit for that. Then I lost it. Then I found it.
 
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Profound contribution to Kawasakian knowledge, Tom!

I sincerely believe the statistical performance of the substitute Yamaha part appears, "Close enough for government work," regarding an implant into a KLR650.

Again, well done!
 

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Just to make sure: the Yamaha fan switch directly powers the fan, not a relay, right?
Excellent question; I understand the Generation 1 thermal switch activates a relay (low current required), and the Generation 2 thermal switch connects full fan current to ground. Are these two switches identical/interchangeable? Don't know.
 

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Just to make sure: the Yamaha fan switch directly powers the fan, not a relay, right?
It would appear that some do, some don't but I can't be sure which ones do, model by model, year by year, size by size. It took me about two days of digging to find that out.

What is really needed here are the specs for the switch, and I spent a lot of time looking for those specs, reading dozens of threads on "so me griz run hot and the guy ware it wthhh swithc but stil hot please help", and trying to pirate schematics. What I learned is that the switch, in this form factor, is widely used in watercraft, Yamahas, Kawasaki's, and Suzukis. There are probably more than that, but that's what I ran into. I was not able to determine who makes the switch, nor was I able to find any manufacturer's specs that would indicate its current handling. While it would not surprise me that the switch is manufactured with some variance in ON/OFF temperatures, I would be surprised if there was more than one set of contacts/current handling capability. There is simply no sense in doing that, as it costs no more or less to make a 15A switch than a 2A switch of the same form factor, and it costs no more or less to use a 15A switch where a 2a switch would suffice, but it does cost more to run a supply chain with two identical switches save for current handling capability. The only way I could see there being two different switches would be if it was originally designed for 2A and a need cropped up for a 15A version but, even in that case, a smart engineering staff would supersede the 2A version.

I can't say which of the Yamaha models do and don't use relays, but I was able to divine, from some forum reading and YouTube, that the newer and larger one ATVs seem to run fan relays and the older and smaller seem to not run them. This switch is used on 400/450 Grizzly, Wolverine, and Kodiak. It may be that all of these do not run a fan relay, but I cannot say with certainty.

The only one I can say with certainty that uses this switch and does not use a relay is the Grizzly 450. This is the schematic, which I have highlighted. It was the only bit of schematic I could find, and it isn't even the whole page:
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TLDR; Yes
 
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Tom, thanks again for your efforts in this research. I figure that if my current switch quits, I’ll buy the one you have described, and just run it. If its life is short, ehh, I’m only out 25 bucks.
 

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The ATV's usually have a significantly larger radiator and therefore Fan per size of engine than a motorcycle. Because they are heavier, run at lower speeds and are often loaded down heavier than our own beloved pack mule.

So, I'll bet that thermo switch will be quite capable of handing the current load of the KLR fans.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Alright, alright, alright. The net finally coughed up something other than a boot and an ugly fish.

I found a manual for the YFM450FAR, which is supposed to be the 2003 Yamaha KODIAK 450 4WD. According to Parts Warehouse, it uses the 5ND-82560-10-00 switch for Thermo Switch 2 (Thermo Switch 1 is in the head and runs an over-temp warning light). According to the new-found manual, this is the fan circuit:

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From the manual, these are the switch specs:
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With that, I am revising my table to include the Yamahamaha switch specs along with the test results:
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See, that Canadanian fella was pretty right when he said On at 180, Off at 170.

And, to @pdwestman's point, if the switch lives up to its specs,
Its apparent lower switch point might allow some people to relax & enjoy the ride more. :)
 

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This thread needs to be 'Stickied' into the 2008 & up Gen 2 section. And / or the 'How to's & Tech' section.
 

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Good work.

Had yer asked me I'd have told yer.
Yamaha 5ND-82560-10-00 is the correct replacement.
Another option is Tourmax RFS-504, which is supposed to switch at 98°C.

What's the conclusion here?
If you ride a lot of city traffic with stop-and-go in some warmer place you might want to exchange the original switch for the Yamaha unit.


 
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