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I'm going to be buying a motorcycle in the next few months, and I've been very interested in getting a KLR. The problem is that I'm a big guy (300+ lbs) and I worry that it won't be powerful enough to get me up to highway speeds, which is 75 where I live. I'm pretty sure I already know the answer, but I was looking for some insight. Thanks.
 

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pfalta133,
Before my wife learned to ride her own bike, we used to ride two-up, up and over the mountains of Wyoming from 5300-10,000 ft elevation. Combined weight, about 325 lbs.
Riding with Sportier bikes or Cruisers or Full dress tourers, some of the older, calmer riders were wishing I'd lead a 'little slower'.

But I will admit, I ride-it like I stole-it.
Don't ride a 'Brand New' engine this hard, please. And check your engine oil level at every fuel stop!
 

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My 2011 owner's manual says "vehicle total payload 401 lb". I weigh 250 and never thought of over loading that thing.
 

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You'll be fine. I have a pre-Taco Bell Tare Weight of 280 and am well over 300 on the bike with my gear and crap I carry. I have stock sprockets. I can cruise at 80mph indicated on the speedometer which is actually around 75mph due to speedometer inaccuracy.

Don't plan on passing anybody in a hurry, but I doubt even 150-pound KLR riders have much of an edge in that process. They key here is to be proactive and don't put yourself in a situation where rapid acceleration is needed and always be cognizant of how you would extract yourself from a tight situation when your only options are steering or braking.

As far as merging acceleration goes, even a 400-pound rider on a KLR will accelerate up to speed quicker than most any other 4-wheeled vehicle around you.
 

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pfalta133,
Before my wife learned to ride her own bike, we used to ride two-up, up and over the mountains of Wyoming from 5300-10,000 ft elevation. Combined weight, about 325 lbs.
I've ridden two up (with the wife on the back) and we have your number beat but I will not report exact weight of each rider due to possible repercussions at home.
 

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I've ridden two up (with the wife on the back) and we have your number beat but I will not report exact weight of each rider due to possible repercussions at home.
You speak wisely!

My wife and I have ridden two-up as well, without any problems...

As for the original poster: Nope. I don't believe you're "too big" for a KLR. I convinced a gorilla of a friend to get his own KLR - he's about 6'4" and exceeds 300 lbs all by his lonesome. That's about the only person I've seen a KLR look "small" under.

He kinda resembles Herman Munster on a Vespa.
 

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You speak wisely!

My wife and I have ridden two-up as well, without any problems...

As for the original poster: Nope. I don't believe you're "too big" for a KLR. I convinced a gorilla of a friend to get his own KLR - he's about 6'4" and exceeds 300 lbs all by his lonesome. That's about the only person I've seen a KLR look "small" under.

He kinda resembles Herman Munster on a Vespa.
LOL, almost blew beer out the nose!!!!

I have a friend/customer of that size. He bought a used Triumph 955 Tiger.
It still looks a little small, to me. With him On It.

Problem is, he 'won't ride it here or there, cause he doesn't want to Hurt IT'.
I don't like to hurt my bike either, but I understand 'gravity wins, usually'.
He has missed a LOT of Great Rides, in my opinion Only!

ps, I forgot to tell ya', he over-braked the Front brake of the Tiger on Main Street a couple of years ago. Pretty Girl on the side-walk caught his Attention, missed the Parallel Parker in front of Him!! $$$$ out of pocket.
 

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75 for a long time is too fast for a KLR, no matter your weight
johnnail, Why?
It is legal again, at least on less Urban sections of Interstate Highways.
And I find it more fun on twisty two lane highways. But on the twisty two lane highways, 75 mph could 'bite' your wallet.
 

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75 for a long time is too fast for a KLR, no matter your weight
Eh. If you live out west you'll be out on the road forever if you don't kick it up.

I've droned along at 80 for hours on end on the KLR through Nevada, Arizona, California, Utah and some godforsaken state with a Lander in it.

"And I have a funny gait to prove it" Tom said limply.

Tom
 

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Droned? LOL
ThumperBob,
Out here in these Wide-Open spaces, 50-100 miles between towns (if ya' Dare call Farson, WY a Town, much less Moneta on the way to Casper) 120 MPH can feel SLOW on a Fast bike or in a decent Car.
The Wyoming Highway Patrol can be few and far between, but the radio is still faster. I think 100+ is, Go Directly to Jail, in most states, now days.
 

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I'd a never known it was more scenic, viewed from West to East than East to West, Tom. Thank you.
I saw it E-W, on April 15th, 1988 at about 90 MPH indicated, on my KLR.
Thank You.
 

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Just because it wasn't made for that. 60/65 is long term doable. 75 is maxing the thing out. It will vibrate like a cheap sex toy 8^)
 

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You are too big only if the suspension bottoms out while parked. LOL
Getcher butt on one and have some fun.
We live wayyy out in farm country and riding triple has been done quite a few
times. Then again my family isn't excactly "normal" LOL

I've crossed entire states (Like brother Tom stated) under some heavy throttle
without a single issue. In remote areas even the cops know ya have to do
80 to get anywhere in a reasonable amount of time. In Texas peeps leave their
driveway at 70 so I've read. Crossing a 13 hour state is much more tolerable in
10 hours.
 
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